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Religion being taught in Modesto high school


Should teaching the History of Religions be allowed in public schools?  

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  1. 1. Should teaching the History of Religions be allowed in public schools?



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I saw a story on the news this evening about Modesto California High School teaching religion as a mandatory class for all students. At first I thought there is no way that will last. As the story went on it explained that the class actually teaches the history and tenants of each of the major religions around the world. The teacher said he motto was, "Teach not Preach".

 

This is one of the most outstanding ideas I have seen in a public school in years. One of the biggest problems with all religions is a lack of compassion and understanding for other religions. What do the BGP'ers think.

 

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The single BEST class I took in college was Introduction to Religious studies (remember, I was a chemistry major, so this was huge). My professor took the same approach. We covered the basic beliefs of most of the major (and many minor) religions. There was a great deal of required readings for the class, including selected passages from the Holy Bible and the Koran. We read the entire Bhagavad Gita, Black Elk Speaks (Sioux beliefs as told by a Lakota shaman), On Christian Liberty by Martin Luther, and Night by Elie Wiesel.

 

I never missed this class. It was eye opening and I felt a sense of....I don't know, maybe urgency, to learn more about other's religions. Thank you, Dr. Synder of Western Kentucky University!

 

I think if taught correctly, this would be a great required class. However, if taught with any kind of judgement, it could actually have a negative effect, I believe.

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The single BEST class I took in college was Introduction to Religious studies (remember, I was a chemistry major, so this was huge). My professor took the same approach. We covered the basic beliefs of most of the major (and many minor) religions. There was a great deal of required readings for the class, including selected passages from the Holy Bible and the Koran. We read the entire Bhagavad Gita, Black Elk Speaks (Sioux beliefs as told by a Lakota shaman), On Christian Liberty by Martin Luther, and Night by Elie Wiesel.

 

I never missed this class. It was eye opening and I felt a sense of....I don't know, maybe urgency, to learn more about other's religions. Thank you, Dr. Synder of Western Kentucky University!

 

I think if taught correctly, this would be a great required class. However, if taught with any kind of judgement, it could actually have a negative effect, I believe.

 

There was a class listed in UK's class catalogue called "Comparative Religions." It would have satisified one of the general ed. requirements, so I always tried to schedule it. Actually, I would have scheduled it even as an elective, as I think I would find such a class very interesting. Unfortunately, during my entire tenure as an undergrad, the class was never offered. Not sure why they even had it in the catalogue, if they had no intentions of offering the class at least once a year. To this day, I still wish I would have been able to sit in on a class focused on dispelling many of the myths that surround modern religion.

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I like you, JS...you're an equal opportunity labeller!

 

Keeping in mind, of course, that it took my total and complete disgust with the Democratic Party on the national level (and I'm getting close on the state level) to drive me to that point. Well, it may have had a lot to do with GWB also.

 

Regardless, both parties are full of loser clowns, and I'm not optimistic that I will ever love politics the way I used to.

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I've always thought a comparative study of religions would be a great benefit. That is as long as it is taught from a scholastic standpoint and not a convert standpoint. This would allow athiests the understanding of the history of religions' origins and dogma, it would not serve as an evaluation of them or even an assessment of these faith systems.

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I have no problem with teaching the history of religion in public school. I took a class in college that was "The Bible as Literature" that would also be appropriate in public school. It was taught from a secular view of the development of the Bible and the prose involved. Song of Songs was a hot topic.

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I have no problem with teaching the history of religion in public school. I took a class in college that was "The Bible as Literature" that would also be appropriate in public school. It was taught from a secular view of the development of the Bible and the prose involved. Song of Songs was a hot topic.

 

Probably the illustrated version was the highest class attendance I'll bet. :thumb:

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I think this is a wonderful idea. My favorite classes in college were religon and theology.

 

 

Keeping in mind, of course, that it took my total and complete disgust with the Democratic Party on the national level (and I'm getting close on the state level) to drive me to that point. Well, it may have had a lot to do with GWB also.

 

Regardless, both parties are full of loser clowns, and I'm not optimistic that I will ever love politics the way I used to.

Jim, ... your dislike of politicians is bringing you closer to the truth! Most of our politicians are controlled by special interest groups in both parties. It is a far cry from a true representative government that our founding fathers established and intended. I don't believe they ever envisioned career politicians.

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