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"The House You Live In"... Dedicated to Rockmom, NWO, and HB20


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Here is a favorite old tune of mine by the great Gordon Lightfoot, interpreted the way that I feel would please Gord'. I want to dedicate this song along with its political interpretation to three folks that I consider very wise and very compassionate---Rockmom, NWO, and HB20 .

 

I must confess that I am often taken aback by the sentiments I read that express little or no compassion for those in our country who, despite doing the best they can, find themselves hungry, jobless, homeless, impoverished, without proper health care, or all of the above. Contrary to what many refuse to acknowledge, or just senselessly rationalize away, there are many folks who go to bed hungry or who sleep each night without a roof over their heads. Many in our country must choose between filling a prescription or buying food for the week.

 

I am all about personal responsibility. Those who absolutely refuse to take any steps whatsoever to improve their lives or who choose to do their drugs instead of caring for their children get very little sympathy from me. But there are many who are responsible, who want to work to improve their lives and their childrens' lives. Some of these folks still need assistance, and should not be denied it.

 

This country has no problem catering to the wealthy, elite, and powerful, but there are so many of our citizens that are forgotten or ignored.

 

For those on here who preach personal responsibility, where is the personal responsibility on your behalf for protecting our fragile environment? Where is the personal responsibilty of our leaders who deceive us in their efforts to engage us in senseless multi-billion dollar conflicts abroad when people in own own country are homeless, hungry, and hurting? Is turning a blind eye to the obvious really the way to take personal responsibilty for anything?

 

We are still the greatest and most powerful country on the face of the Earth, yet we are faltering in so many obvious ways. We have lost much respect around the world. Many within our own country question the direction that our country is headed. Katrina was just a boil... just a symptom of a much more hideous disease of the mind that is eating away at the very fabric of our society and threatens to be our demise.

 

"The house that you live in will never fall down if you pity the stranger who stands at your gate." Until we start to live as a people united with this mindset, our house and our country is destined to fall.

 

For Rockmom, NWO, and HB20: "The House You Live In"(Gordon Lightfoot)

 

DISCLAIMER: Video Has a Strong Political Message.

 

 

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Here is a favorite old tune of mine by the great Gordon Lightfoot, interpreted the way that I feel would please Gord'. I want to dedicate this song along with its political interpretation to three folks that I consider very wise and very compassionate---Rockmom, NWO, and HB20 .

 

I must confess that I am often taken aback by the sentiments I read that express little or no compassion for those in our country who, despite doing the best they can, find themselves hungry, jobless, homeless, impoverished, without proper health care, or all of the above. Contrary to what many refuse to acknowledge, or just senselessly rationalize away, there are many folks who go to bed hungry or who sleep each night without a roof over their heads. Many in our country must choose between filling a prescription or buying food for the week.

 

I am all about personal responsibility. Those who absolutely refuse to take any steps whatsoever to improve their lives or who choose to do their drugs instead of caring for their children get very little sympathy from me. But there are many who are responsible, who want to work to improve their lives and their childrens' lives. Some of these folks still need assistance, and should not be denied it.

 

This country has no problem catering to the wealthy, elite, and powerful, but there are so many of our citizens that are forgotten or ignored.

 

For those on here who preach personal responsibility, where is the personal responsibility on your behalf for protecting our fragile environment? Where is the personal responsibilty of our leaders who deceive us in their efforts to engage us in senseless multi-billion dollar conflicts abroad when people in own own country are homeless, hungry, and hurting? Is turning a blind eye to the obvious really the way to take personal responsibilty for anything?

 

We are still the greatest and most powerful country on the face of the Earth, yet we are faltering in so many obvious ways. We have lost much respect around the world. Many within our own country question the direction that our country is headed. Katrina was just a boil... just a symptom of a much more hideous disease of the mind that is eating away at the very fabric of our society and threatens to be our demise.

 

"The house that you live in will never fall down if you pity the stranger who stands at your gate." Until we start to live as a people united with this mindset, our house and our country is destined to fall.

 

For Rockmom, NWO, and HB20: "The House You Live In"(Gordon Lightfoot)

 

DISCLAIMER: Video Has a Strong Political Message.

 

 

 

I am ordering RTS and AcesFull not to rise to the bait in this thread!:lol:

 

Actually, you were very eloquent in your post. I agree with you on one salient point: that the country is destined to fall, but I see a different cause, and that is the lack of moral unity. I also agree that Katrina was a boil that was a symptom of a greater disease, reflected in the behavior of the people there.

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Math, thank you.

 

I too get very upset, maybe irrationally so, when I see so many pieces of evidence of a society moving away from compassion and fellowship.

 

I admit much of my personal view of my responsibility for others comes from the example of my parents. My father was the oldest of 13 children. He never went to high school, having been forced by the economics of his family's situation when he was a youngster, and went to work. All my life, he helped all his siblings in need, and many of their children. He bought a farm from his brother some time before he met my mother. Until I was in my 20's, my grandparents lived there, rent free. At least twice a month we visited them. When we went, we took groceries to help them out. Living there too were some of my dad's siblings. Many grew up there.

 

A couple of his brothers lived with us for a few years here in Louisville. As well, I can remember cousins living with us.

 

My mother's parents had a farm. We got our milk, eggs and some veggies from them. Each fall, my parents bought a calf from them and we got our beef that way. We had a garden in our back yard, and all summer my mom and we girls canned and froze veggies. And we shared with my father's family.

 

My mom never worked outside the home, and my father never made more than $20,000 in a good year. Somehow, my parents were able to support all of us children, including sending most of us to Catholic schools and support my dad's family. My dad, still to this day, never has turned anyone away in need of help. They live on a pension now, and still have people living at their home with them. They've continued to help his siblings in need, including my dad's sister who's suffering from a debilitating degenerative spinal condition.

 

My father's philosophy is that you are responsible for those in need, if you have it in your power to help them.

 

My family went through some really tough times in the early '70's. My father lost his job when the A&P bakery closed and he couldn't find a job for months and months. Getting work without a high-school diploma even then was next to impossible. But, I don't remember ever hearing my dad say no to anyone in need. Whether it be extending a helping hand to a neighbor, letting a wayward cousing live with us to stay out of trouble, or giving whatever donation we could to a charity, he has never not reached out.

 

Many posts I see here seem to indicate that there is no responsibility on the part of the "have's" for the "have not's". Maybe I'm "naive". But, I'll choose, every day of my life, to try to live up to what my father has stood for all his life. I'd rather be a "have not" helping a "have not", than a "have" with no sympathy for the "have not's".

 

I'm not of the mind that this country will fall. I'm the "eternal optimist", and believe that before that happens, there will be some that will "see the light". I have faith in the "humanity" of most Americans, and that the seemingly ever-increasing instances of tragedy will open eyes, and hearts.

 

 

Thanks, Math, for the thoughts, the thread and the video.:thumb:

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Math, thank you.

 

I too get very upset, maybe irrationally so, when I see so many pieces of evidence of a society moving away from compassion and fellowship.

 

I admit much of my personal view of my responsibility for others comes from the example of my parents. My father was the oldest of 13 children. He never went to high school, having been forced by the economics of his family's situation when he was a youngster, and went to work. All my life, he helped all his siblings in need, and many of their children. He bought a farm from his brother some time before he met my mother. Until I was in my 20's, my grandparents lived there, rent free. At least twice a month we visited them. When we went, we took groceries to help them out. Living there too were some of my dad's siblings. Many grew up there.

 

A couple of his brothers lived with us for a few years here in Louisville. As well, I can remember cousins living with us.

 

My mother's parents had a farm. We got our milk, eggs and some veggies from them. Each fall, my parents bought a calf from them and we got our beef that way. We had a garden in our back yard, and all summer my mom and we girls canned and froze veggies. And we shared with my father's family.

 

My mom never worked outside the home, and my father never made more than $20,000 in a good year. Somehow, my parents were able to support all of us children, including sending most of us to Catholic schools and support my dad's family. My dad, still to this day, never has turned anyone away in need of help. They live on a pension now, and still have people living at their home with them. They've continued to help his siblings in need, including my dad's sister who's suffering from a debilitating degenerative spinal condition.

 

My father's philosophy is that you are responsible for those in need, if you have it in your power to help them.

 

My family went through some really tough times in the early '70's. My father lost his job when the A&P bakery closed and he couldn't find a job for months and months. Getting work without a high-school diploma even then was next to impossible. But, I don't remember ever hearing my dad say no to anyone in need. Whether it be extending a helping hand to a neighbor, letting a wayward cousing live with us to stay out of trouble, or giving whatever donation we could to a charity, he has never not reached out.

 

Many posts I see here seem to indicate that there is no responsibility on the part of the "have's" for the "have not's". Maybe I'm "naive". But, I'll choose, every day of my life, to try to live up to what my father has stood for all his life. I'd rather be a "have not" helping a "have not", than a "have" with no sympathy for the "have not's".

 

I'm not of the mind that this country will fall. I'm the "eternal optimist", and believe that before that happens, there will be some that will "see the light". I have faith in the "humanity" of most Americans, and that the seemingly ever-increasing instances of tragedy will open eyes, and hearts.

 

 

Thanks, Math, for the thoughts, the thread and the video.:thumb:

 

 

 

Beautifully said and very poignant. Your parents have certainly set wonderful examples on how to lead one's life. They have taught about REAL abundance. Congratulations.

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Math, thank you.

 

 

 

Many posts I see here seem to indicate that there is no responsibility on the part of the "have's" for the "have not's". Maybe I'm "naive". But, I'll choose, every day of my life, to try to live up to what my father has stood for all his life. I'd rather be a "have not" helping a "have not", than a "have" with no sympathy for the "have not's".

 

.:thumb:

 

IMO the key word here is "choose". It's great that you choose to help others and I'm right there with you. I prefer individual choice to help, not government mandated. Churches, charity organizations, etc. - all great.

When this position is forced on others through politics is a different story.

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Plato, I agree that "choose" should be the operative word. However, there are probably more individual cases of charities that I could name who are underfunded, understaffed, and fewer and fewer donations and volunteers are coming in each year. What then? I agree that theoretically, churches and charity organizations should be the primary source of aid. But, in reality, given that there's already a continually declining level of charitable donations, (in a general sense), what options do you propose?

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Plato, I agree that "choose" should be the operative word. However, there are probably more individual cases of charities that I could name who are underfunded, understaffed, and fewer and fewer donations and volunteers are coming in each year. What then? I agree that theoretically, churches and charity organizations should be the primary source of aid. But, in reality, given that there's already a continually declining level of charitable donations, (in a general sense), what options do you propose?

 

Do you feel if taxes weren't so high to help fund these public assistance programs, would people be able to give more to those charities and assistance organizations? And I do know that a smaller portion of our taxes go to welfare programs than other programs roads, military etc... Just a hypothetical question.

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Do you feel if taxes weren't so high to help fund these public assistance programs, would people be able to give more to those charities and assistance organizations? And I do know that a smaller portion of our taxes go to welfare programs than other programs roads, military etc... Just a hypothetical question.

 

Personally, (and I have no proof whatsoever), but I don't think lower taxes would result in an increase in charitable donations.

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Personally, (and I have no proof whatsoever), but I don't think lower taxes would result in an increase in charitable donations.

 

 

Fair enough, you may be right. I doubt we will ever be able to know for sure.

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