Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
theguru

Spring Sports Cancellation, Basketball events not to be resumed

Recommended Posts

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 21, 2020

 

With the announcement yesterday of the recommended closure of all K-12 schools to in-person instruction throughout Kentucky for the remainder of the school year, the KHSAA Board of Control today approved the Commissioner’s recommendation and announcement by unanimous vote that the 2020 state basketball tournaments will not be resumed, while also approving the cancellation of all regular-season practices and contests as well as all postseason tournament championship events for all spring sports and sport-activities for the 2019-20 school year. This means the termination of the Archery, Bass Fishing, Esports, Baseball, Softball, Tennis, and Track & Field seasons. This will also result in the continuance of all provisions of the Coronavirus Dead Period provisions until further notice to the member schools from the Commissioner.

 

"We have until this point purposely taken a measured approach to the resumption of our basketball events and consideration of the ending of the spring seasons for sports and sport-activities,” stated KHSAA Commissioner Julian Tackett. “We have accepted continual guidance from a variety of sources, and have steadfastly held on to hope that the great student-athletes who represent their schools through a variety of teams would have an opportunity to compete this season.

 

“This is without question the most challenging period I have seen or faced in thirty-six years in this office. This impacts so many people, but in the end, is in the best interest of public health. We have been especially concerned with the graduating class of 2020, those seniors who put so much into their athletic participation opportunities hoping for one last time to shine before the home crowds or at postseason events. We know for the vast majority of them, their future plans are already laid out, with college and career final preparation as their next chapter. We are also keenly aware that per almost all metrics, 94% of the students who participate in high school sports and sport-activities are involved in their last organized competition while in high school, as the lion’s share of participants will not play beyond this level. In the end, however, the health and safety of all individuals, participants, coaches, and spectators, is much more important than the various interscholastic activities.

 

“Nothing in mine, or frankly, anyone else’s professional career completely prepared me for this situation since mid-March and the related subsequent decisions. That was probably the hardest thing to deal with,” added Tackett. “These kids don’t get a chance to finish, especially the seniors, and it is as though they were robbed by an invisible enemy. It is sometimes a little easier in life when there is someone to blame. With this, however, there isn’t. We are all together fighting the same enemy with the same desired outcome.

 

“Everyone involved in school-based athletics in our Commonwealth has been impacted. We as a staff and Board have talked every day about the students and families, coaches, administrators, officials, and fans who lost a non-recoverable portion of their lives, particularly our seniors. Corporate partners and others, while continuing to be fantastic supporters of the KHSAA and almost all agreeing to continue their full support of the Association and its events during these financially catastrophic times, also missed out on great opportunities. And our venues and their employees were also tremendously fiscally and personally impacted. There were, and are, no winners in this situation and these decisions.

 

“The Association will continue to communicate with member school Principals, Athletic Directors and Superintendents as we navigate the various stages and phases of resuming sports and sport-activities for the fall. The current virus dead period provisions will remain in place until, at the very least, we as a Commonwealth are cleared to be considered into Phase 1 of the Federal and State guidelines. Before that time, staff will advise our member schools as to any changes to the restrictions moving forward. There is also no plan at this time to alter, in any way, the Bylaw 24 Dead Periods for the coming or specific restrictions on organized activity in football and basketball that is also contained in that bylaw.

 

“We have recently developed special recognition programs which we hope our schools will take advantage of, to recognize at the very least the seniors who lost that last season, but also all spring sports participants and those who qualified for the state basketball tournaments and were unable to complete those events.

 

“We will also continue to communicate with our teams that qualified for the basketball tournament and were unable to complete this event about possible activities within the bylaws of the KHSAA at the start of the 2020-21 season if they desire that opportunity. Unfortunately, our spring sports never began and as such, there represents no resumption or event opportunity.

 

“There is no doubt that people will second-guess this recommendation and decision as well as all others made during this pandemic and its fallout. I would encourage anyone who objects or has drawn their own conclusions to carefully review a couple of well-written articles about incidents that happened at the start of this situation, not in our state but just north of us [Coronavirus deaths followed Indiana basketball sectional and Indiana high school basketball: Sectional 1 coronavirus timeline],” added Tackett. “I realize there seems to be some thinking in limited circles about specific groups being the only ones impacted or other rationalization for us resuming early (too early). These articles carefully break down an event similar to what we would see in our schools. I doubt that the objectors regarding the cancellation of sports will finish reading without a somewhat revised opinion.”

 

KHSAA Board of Control President Pete Galloway stated, “Our students, coaches, officials, administrators, parents, and families must be encouraged in every manner to continue to adhere to the guidance provided by our state and national leadership. The Association understands the extreme seriousness of this pandemic and joins in support of current measures being implemented, as well as any future considerations, to ensure a return to normalcy. In unwavering support, yet with extreme sadness, we must agree to cancel our spring sports and sport-activities. We join all Kentuckians in anticipation of a triumphant homecoming back to our schools and school facilities at some point in the fall of 2020 complete with a full complement of KHSAA sports and sport-activities.”

 

The Board and staff will continue discussions over the coming weeks to attempt to address issues related to the fall season.

 

“It is far too early in this process and battle against this virus to place an absolute planned schedule or dates out there,” stated Commissioner Tackett. “We remain optimistic about the fall season, even if it isn’t exactly per normal, but we will adhere to the guidance of both federal and state health officials, as well as our own Department of Education...

 

===================

 

I redacted some of the press release so that it is within our Terms of Service, you can view the entire release at the below link:

 

4/21/2- Spring Sports Cancellation, Basketball Events Not To Be Resumed | Kentucky High School Athletic Association

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good luck to all the seniors of spring sports! We will always remember you! Class of 2020 are all stars!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So sorry for all the seniors. I truly don’t understand why we couldn’t wait a couple weeks longer to see how the virus was trending. And sports like bass fishing, archery, tennis, and esports couldn’t be held? And even baseball and softball has limited physical contact.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So sorry for all the seniors. I truly don’t understand why we couldn’t wait a couple weeks longer to see how the virus was trending. And sports like bass fishing, archery, tennis, and esports couldn’t be held? And even baseball and softball has limited physical contact.

 

I agree on some sports but I do not see how it is possible to practice social distance in the dugout. I coach Knothole and I do not see how we have a season this summer either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So sorry for all the seniors. I truly don’t understand why we couldn’t wait a couple weeks longer to see how the virus was trending. And sports like bass fishing, archery, tennis, and esports couldn’t be held? And even baseball and softball has limited physical contact.

 

Dugouts are the problem in baseball and softball. There’s simply no way to socially distance a 20 person baseball team. Besides the dugouts, you have the umpire and catcher who are in close proximity. Waiting a couple weeks puts you into the second week of May. Most schools will be out by mid May. Teams would still need two weeks to get ready, which even then isn’t really enough for pitchers to prepare. By the time teams would be ready, you’d have maybe a month to get in a regular season and playoffs. We’ve simply ran out of time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to all basketball seniors, Girls and Boys who made the sweet 16 and seniors in general who play a spring sport.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The thing about my school Russell and others is Even though the sweet 16 didn't get played, no one will ever be able to change the fact that Russell was 2020 16th region Girls Champions. All other region winners can say the same thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dugouts are the problem in baseball and softball. There’s simply no way to socially distance a 20 person baseball team. Besides the dugouts, you have the umpire and catcher who are in close proximity. Waiting a couple weeks puts you into the second week of May. Most schools will be out by mid May. Teams would still need two weeks to get ready, which even then isn’t really enough for pitchers to prepare. By the time teams would be ready, you’d have maybe a month to get in a regular season and playoffs. We’ve simply ran out of time.

 

I agree with all of this

 

*Dugout proximity (and cleanliness)

*Bus proximity (and cleanliness)

*Portapotties (do I really need to go on)

*Sharing of bats/water bottles

*Multiple people touching same ball (and wearing glove on your throwing hand is awkward)

*Batter/catcher/umpire proximity

*Tagouts/slides

 

Not to mention, many press boxes are NOT set up to allow spread out for book, announcer, scoreboard keeper, press

 

Just because they're outside and spread out on the playing surface, people assume baseball and softball should be safe.

 

They're far from it when you dig inside.

 

Football: Too much contact. Proximity issues.

Wrestling: Most physical contact. Proximity issues.

Soccer: Too much contact. Sharing same water. Touching same ball.

Swimming: You share same water.

Basketball: A lot more contact than people want to admit.

Tennis: Four players touching same ball. Proximity issues in doubles.

Track: Field events might be OK (would have to wipe off pole vault and high jump mats consistently), but mile/2-mile/800 have packing issues.

Cross country: Spreading out starts would be difficult. Packing/proximity issues during running.

Volleyball: 12+ girls touching same ball. Diving/Sweating on same floor. Good luck spreading out bench.

Archery: Would have to thin out teams, making meets drag on.

E-sports: need to be in same room. Doing remotely allows for too many connectivity issues and outside interference.

Bowling: Individuals would be OK. Could spread out (but make events longer and no one owns their own bowling alley, so at mercy/goodwill of lanes). Baker involves 5 per team, so proximity issues.

 

Golf, singles tennis (although 2 people sharing same ball) and singles bowling are about the only 3 sports which could be held with few radical changes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree with all of this

 

*Dugout proximity (and cleanliness)

*Bus proximity (and cleanliness)

*Portapotties (do I really need to go on)

*Sharing of bats/water bottles

*Multiple people touching same ball (and wearing glove on your throwing hand is awkward)

*Batter/catcher/umpire proximity

*Tagouts/slides

 

Not to mention, many press boxes are NOT set up to allow spread out for book, announcer, scoreboard keeper, press

 

Just because they're outside and spread out on the playing surface, people assume baseball and softball should be safe.

 

They're far from it when you dig inside.

 

Football: Too much contact. Proximity issues.

Wrestling: Most physical contact. Proximity issues.

Soccer: Too much contact. Sharing same water. Touching same ball.

Swimming: You share same water.

Basketball: A lot more contact than people want to admit.

Tennis: Four players touching same ball. Proximity issues in doubles.

Track: Field events might be OK (would have to wipe off pole vault and high jump mats consistently), but mile/2-mile/800 have packing issues.

Cross country: Spreading out starts would be difficult. Packing/proximity issues during running.

Volleyball: 12+ girls touching same ball. Diving/Sweating on same floor. Good luck spreading out bench.

Archery: Would have to thin out teams, making meets drag on.

E-sports: need to be in same room. Doing remotely allows for too many connectivity issues and outside interference.

Bowling: Individuals would be OK. Could spread out (but make events longer and no one owns their own bowling alley, so at mercy/goodwill of lanes). Baker involves 5 per team, so proximity issues.

 

Golf, singles tennis (although 2 people sharing same ball) and singles bowling are about the only 3 sports which could be held with few radical changes.

 

I never even considered the water issue. Even if you went with disposable cups instead of bottles, players would still be all touching the cooler to dispense the water into the cups. Another issue is the risk the athletic trainers would have, as their job requires close contact with individuals. They can't do their jobs from 6 feet away.

 

On a side note, I wonder if this is what finally kills the post/pre game handshakes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I never even considered the water issue. Even if you went with disposable cups instead of bottles, players would still be all touching the cooler to dispense the water into the cups. Another issue is the risk the athletic trainers would have, as their job requires close contact with individuals. They can't do their jobs from 6 feet away.

 

On a side note, I wonder if this is what finally kills the post/pre game handshakes?

 

And basketball/softball/soccer circle prayers.

 

Or football postgame huddles by goalposts.

 

The volleyball spanking/patting after each point

 

Basketball fist bumps after free throws

 

Baseball or softball crowd-the-plate celebrations after home runs or winning runs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree with all of this

 

*Dugout proximity (and cleanliness)

*Bus proximity (and cleanliness)

*Portapotties (do I really need to go on)

*Sharing of bats/water bottles

*Multiple people touching same ball (and wearing glove on your throwing hand is awkward)

*Batter/catcher/umpire proximity

*Tagouts/slides

 

Not to mention, many press boxes are NOT set up to allow spread out for book, announcer, scoreboard keeper, press

 

Just because they're outside and spread out on the playing surface, people assume baseball and softball should be safe.

 

They're far from it when you dig inside.

 

Football: Too much contact. Proximity issues.

Wrestling: Most physical contact. Proximity issues.

Soccer: Too much contact. Sharing same water. Touching same ball.

Swimming: You share same water.

Basketball: A lot more contact than people want to admit.

Tennis: Four players touching same ball. Proximity issues in doubles.

Track: Field events might be OK (would have to wipe off pole vault and high jump mats consistently), but mile/2-mile/800 have packing issues.

Cross country: Spreading out starts would be difficult. Packing/proximity issues during running.

Volleyball: 12+ girls touching same ball. Diving/Sweating on same floor. Good luck spreading out bench.

Archery: Would have to thin out teams, making meets drag on.

E-sports: need to be in same room. Doing remotely allows for too many connectivity issues and outside interference.

Bowling: Individuals would be OK. Could spread out (but make events longer and no one owns their own bowling alley, so at mercy/goodwill of lanes). Baker involves 5 per team, so proximity issues.

 

Golf, singles tennis (although 2 people sharing same ball) and singles bowling are about the only 3 sports which could be held with few radical changes.

I don’t think there’s any evidence that the virus is spread thru sweat. So I don’t see the virus being passed to tennis players from touching the same ball. I don’t see players sneezing or coughing on the balls. Same for volleyball. And esports could easily be segregated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
I don’t think there’s any evidence that the virus is spread thru sweat. So I don’t see the virus being passed to tennis players from touching the same ball. I don’t see players sneezing or coughing on the balls. Same for volleyball. And esports could easily be segregated.

 

Sneezing or coughing? The virus can be spread through droplets and vapor, just from speaking or breathing, hence the strong recommendations for masks and social distancing. One study* has shown the virus can remain airborne for up to three hours. Another study* has shown that, depending on conditions, the virus can survive on surfaces for up to three days.

 

Breathe hard, wipe your mouth/nose, grab and serve a tennis or volleyball, return serve, etc. How many people, exponentially, are affected just from these two "non-contact" sports within a single match? And more than just the players, right? Coaches, trainers, officials, bus drivers ... And who knows who anyone from either community has been exposed to?

 

I couldn't begin to ask or expect even healthy student-athletes, staff or fans to be a part of competitions under current or near future conditions.

 

For me, way too many unknowns to even consider sports, contact or not, as a possibility. Until we're well into three measured phases (and this may be a year) of reopening many other areas of our lives safely first, no sports.

 

* "COVID-19 Basics" Harvard Health Publishing (Harvard Medical School)

 

COVID-19 basics - Harvard Health

Edited by Runcible Owl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sneezing or coughing? The virus can be spread through droplets and vapor, just from speaking or breathing, hence the strong recommendations for masks and social distancing. One study* has shown the virus can remain airborne for up to three hours. Another study* has shown that, depending on conditions, the virus can survive on surfaces for up to three days.

 

Breathe hard, wipe your mouth/nose, grab and serve a tennis or volleyball, return serve, etc. How many people, exponentially, are affected just from these two "non-contact" sports within a single match? And more than just the players, right? Coaches, trainers, officials, bus drivers ... And who knows who anyone from either community has been exposed to?

 

I couldn't begin to ask or expect even healthy student-athletes, staff or fans to be a part of competitions under current or near future conditions.

 

For me, way too many unknowns to even consider sports, contact or not, as a possibility. Until we're well into three measured phases (and this may be a year) of reopening many other areas of our lives safely first, no sports.

 

* "COVID-19 Basics" Harvard Health Publishing (Harvard Medical School)

 

COVID-19 basics - Harvard Health

 

And think about the all the action at the net in volleyball. While there might not be true physical contact, players are often in very close proximity to each other. And team to team transmission isn’t the only worry. Remember, transmission within a team is just as big of a problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...