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What Age Should You Start Lifting ?


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I have a younger brother who is turning into an absolute giant. He's grown an inch in the last month. He now stands at 6'3", 243 lbs:scared:. He's a 14 year old freshman and plays football.

 

I understand this is somewhat of a loaded question, but around what age should it be healthy for a kid to start lifting ?

 

He's still growing. I know he hasn't fully matured because as he was playing ball outside without no shirt on, I noticed he didn't have any chest, facial or underarm hair.

 

I have a very close family friend who is an ex-marine and is one of the most muscular guys I've ever met. When the time is right, I want to get my little brother to start working out with him.

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I am probably not the best equipped to answer this question. You always hear stories of kids starting out lifting too young and having it stunt some of their muscle and skeletal growth. Most are encouraged to lift at a lower weight higher rep until they are more physically developed. I would say he is at the age where he should be fine by now but I would consult with an expert.

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He's always been a big kid, but in the last 6 months, he's been growing like crazy.

 

He's the opposite of how I was. I've been 6 foot 200 plus since the 6th grade. I think I came out of the womb with a beard:lol:

 

That's the only thing that keeps me from telling him to lift hard at this point. I know he's still going to grow quite a bit. I don't think he's that close to being fully developed.

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Lifting in 7th, 8th grade is appropriate. Lifting as a 9th grader is a must; for an athlete.

 

As a middle schooler, emphasis should be placed on proper form and repititions of low weight.

 

That way as a high schooler, their form will be perfected and can lift moderate amounts of weights.

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Lifting in 7th, 8th grade is appropriate. Lifting as a 9th grader is a must; for an athlete.

 

As a middle schooler, emphasis should be placed on proper form and repititions of low weight.

 

That way as a high schooler, their form will be perfected and can lift moderate amounts of weights.

 

I started lifting as an 8th grader.

 

He currently lifts with his football team(at this point in the year, lifting is optional for them). I'll be honest, I haven't been that impressed with their weightlifting program. I've worked out with the buddy I mentioned earlier and it's torture. It's a military style workout and the results come very quickly.

 

I would prefer that he work out with my friend in a one on one session as opposed to with 40 other kids and 3 coaches.

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My high school basketball coach would not let anyone younger than Sophmore to do heavy lifting. We had an 8th grader playing up to jv and while we lifted he did a push up workout, as freshman they would do tone stuff instead of heavy lifting. Again, this is basketball.

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I would prefer that he work out with my friend in a one on one session as opposed to with 40 other kids and 3 coaches.

 

I think he could do that also, but what kind of image does that portray to the rest of his team mates if he doesn't lift with the team? I'd say the coaches would also feel a slap in the face.

 

This is where coaches get their first look at most of the kids unless they were scouting them in middle school and for him to be a no show, I wouldn't think it would be wise.

 

Leadership, determination, success, relationships are built inside weightrooms.

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14-15 is what I would say and most trainers I have talked to as well. I see young kids doing agility drills and running sprints with parachutes but no weights.

 

If that kid is growing like that, keep him lifting and feed that kid as much protein that you can. Sounds like he is going through a growth spurt. Keep us posted on the manchild.

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14-15 is what I would say and most trainers I have talked to as well. I see young kids doing agility drills and running sprints with parachutes but no weights.

 

If that kid is growing like that, keep him lifting and feed that kid as much protein that you can. Sounds like he is going through a growth spurt. Keep us posted on the manchild.

 

You are 100% correct.

 

Anyone who says lifting below the age of 14 is ok, does not need to be let around kids, even if just for "form".

 

Too many injuries and problems later in life in the shoulder and hip joints.

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You are 100% correct.

 

Anyone who says lifting below the age of 14 is ok, does not need to be let around kids, even if just for "form".

 

Too many injuries and problems later in life in the shoulder and hip joints.

First of all the bolded part is just silly. Second, it really depends on the kid. Some are ready at ages younger then 14 some aren't.

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First of all the bolded part is just silly. Second, it really depends on the kid. Some are ready at ages younger then 14 some aren't.

 

 

Keep telling yourself that.

 

If they are in the gym with a CERTIFIED S&C Coach then yes, they can work on form, etc.

 

 

Too many schools in Ky. have PE/Football coaches who know a little about lifting that are in the weight room with these kids, its even worse at the MS level.

 

Kids develop differently, but a 6'3" 240 14 year old is just as susceptible to injuries in the shoulder, hip, and knee area as a much smaller 14 yr. old, maybe even more so.

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