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Questions about the Double Wing


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I know Estill runs it. Are there any other schools that run the Double Wing? I have been doing a lot of research into this offense and with so many school at the 1A and 2A levels being restricted in terms of numbers, I would think some other schools would give it a chance. Anyone else you know running the DW?

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I'm not sure on this one, but I believe one of the Muhlenberg schools runs it. Great offense for smaller, blue collar, schools. I'm a huge fan of it, but I honestly think a lot of schools are very leary about running it, simply because a lot of people don't get it. I think a lot of schools either want to see what they see on Saturdays and Sundays, or if they want a smashmouth style, they expect to see the wishbone and I formations of the 70s.

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I know Estill runs it. Are there any other schools that run the Double Wing? I have been doing a lot of research into this offense and with so many school at the 1A and 2A levels being restricted in terms of numbers, I would think some other schools would give it a chance. Anyone else you know running the DW?

 

 

When you say double wing what offensive scheme are you talking about using with this formation. Wing-T or Veer? There are multiple things you can do out of this formation. Actually is one I like. I like running veer out of this formation.

 

You can get funky and move some folks around and it creates problems.

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If it is the true Double Wing, we're talking about foot to foot splits, a Fullback in the sniffer position (about 6 inches behind the QB), built off of running the ball like crazy with just a handful of core running plays.

 

Anything else, is just variations of run and shoot, wing-t, and veer. I'm assuming that Born2Reign is referring to the true Double Wing that Estill runs, and not the double slots that some of the others are referring to.

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When you say double wing what offensive scheme are you talking about using with this formation. Wing-T or Veer? There are multiple things you can do out of this formation. Actually is one I like. I like running veer out of this formation.

 

You can get funky and move some folks around and it creates problems.

 

Double Wing is aptly described by Coach Hard. A lot of folks confuse the Tight Ace formation and the Flexbone with the Double Wing. I mean the true Double Wing offense, started by Don Markum and run by teams like Estill in Kentucky and Clovis East in California. Two Wings, one fullback, no line spilts, two tights running plays like Superpower, Wedge, Criss- Cross Counter, etc.

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If it is the true Double Wing, we're talking about foot to foot splits, a Fullback in the sniffer position (about 6 inches behind the QB), built off of running the ball like crazy with just a handful of core running plays.

 

Anything else, is just variations of run and shoot, wing-t, and veer. I'm assuming that Born2Reign is referring to the true Double Wing that Estill runs, and not the double slots that some of the others are referring to.

 

The true double wing does not necessarily mean foot to foot splits and the fullback (or "B" back) close to the qb. That is another variation that has been popularized by Hugh Wyatt and Don Markam, who's videos sell quite well and are very good. Also, their version includes parts that has the qb in a "shortgun" position next to the fullback ("B"). In fact I have purchased them and the playbook. But you are correct in that the players are in a wing position not a slot position.

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I know Wyatt sometimes will go to 6-12 in splits but that is it. I do not know of any doublewing team that goes larger. I think in KY there might be 5 teams or so that run it. The problems are it is not fan friendly until you get the people to buy into it. It is a pound it out core offense (5 plays make up the core with some subsets such as rocket and speed sweep/stryker/jet)

 

They do have a Wildcat formation which is what doubelduece is refering to. Wyatt ran it from a double slot formation while in Europe. You can run it from that formation but you do not get the shoeshine blocks. When run well it can be nasty. Scotts Branch HS runs it with a ton of shifting and motion. There are some teams that run it from an I or stack I. Murphy (HC at Clovis East) as some single back stuff too.

 

If a community would buy in then the offense can get very very good. One of the reasons is because you can run the whole thing from youth to HS. If a group would stick with it long enough to get those types of benefits you could see a very strong program. The big issue is it is not what is on Sat and Sun.

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I know that I pesonally love to see these type offenses. I am old school and love the running game. I love watching just about any run oriented offense. When ran correctly imo the single wing, double wing, wingT (Just ask Coach McGlone at Russell) along with the true wishbone(former Ashland coach Herb Conley) and veer are just about unstoppable.

Of course each Coach has to adjust to the talent that he has on any given year and the ever growing trend (as another has said) is to run a spread/passing type offense. I will say that I like the "spread option" style. That imo is what I call a modern day wishbone.

 

When I think of the run oriented offense I can't help but go back to my favorite line out of my favorite football movie "Rmember the Titans". When the coach handed the playbook to his assistants and they laughed/questioned on how small it was, his reply was............"It's the split veer gentlemen and it's just like novacane. May take a while but it is effective." :D:thumb:

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A good deal of the modern "spread" teams are singlewing teams or strongly based out of it. Rich Rod use to say that while he was at Clemson before he went to WVU. Urban Meyer says that is what they run at FL. There is a number of old singlewing clips on youtube and it looks a like these "modern" offenses.

 

I think one of the top class winers in VA ran a singlewing. Singlewing is run in a number of states and winning. One of the state winners in IN ran the doublewing. Now the wing t that Russell seems to run is a little different then what most think of. Most think of the Deleware version where Russell seems to run a more power style.

 

One thing people have to keep in mind when talking about these offenses is there is a difference between an offensive system and a formation.

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Barrell brings up a great point. True double wing is a system, and not just a formation. Yes, guys like Murphy and others have implimented variations with their backs and TEs, but the "core" is essentially the same.

 

I think a lot of the success that it has right now is coming from this being kinda "weird." Think about it...defenses prepare week in and week out for spread, I, option, wing-t, veer...but for the most part the DW is completely foreign to them. That's why I love it. It is old school, but new all in the same package. Has tons of defensive misconceptions, that a good DW team will take advantage of. All those bodies flying around in a confined space is backwards from what most folks are leaning toward with the growing popularity of the Spread, which as it has been stated has a lot of its roots in single wing. I guess it is a lot like when folks in college have to prepare to play Navy or Air Force. You here ol' Lou Holtz talk about it all the time, on how while he was at ND, they had to spend so much focusing on each individuals assignment because it was so unique. So much time has to focused on stopping something that you just don't see a lot of. Which gives teams like Navy and Air Force an advantage, even though they have lesser caliber athletes. Now I realize they don't run the DW, but it is just a comparison for the high school situation. It allows lesser athletes to have greater success.

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Is that really what it is called?

 

Yep, not uncommon to hear them called "sniffer" as a slang amoung DW coaches. Now, when explaining it to others (non DWers) they will still call them FBs. Sniffer is like a "pet name." But when you're coaching the FB, you let him know that he should be able to tell if the QB has gas or not:lol:

 

Like it was mentioned earlier, they don't have to be that close. On some formations they may be deeper, or even lined up next to the QB directly beihnd the Guard. But nothing is cooler than a sniffer.:banana:

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Is that really what it is called?

Yes, that is an actual football term, in the Double Wing. And if you ever see it, you will know why. As Coach Hard stated, sometimes the FB is right beside the QB, that is a strange thing too, when you see it, a FB in a three point stance beside the QB.

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Yep, not uncommon to hear them called "sniffer" as a slang amoung DW coaches. Now, when explaining it to others (non DWers) they will still call them FBs. Sniffer is like a "pet name." But when you're coaching the FB, you let him know that he should be able to tell if the QB has gas or not:lol:

 

Like it was mentioned earlier, they don't have to be that close. On some formations they may be deeper, or even lined up next to the QB directly beihnd the Guard. But nothing is cooler than a sniffer.:banana:

 

That's great :lol:

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