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KHSAA rebuffs proposal for classes in baseball (per Jason Frakes)


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“Many times, thorough review of potential changes yields a result that change is not necessary. I think that was the result of this discussion,” KHSAA commissioner Julian Tackett said in a news release. “The data simply illustrated that while change is possible, it was not in the best interest of the student-athletes of our state or the member schools and the various constituent groups represented.”

 

Among the reasons cited against classification, the KHSAA named increased travel and expenses and added, “In many cases, new class systems simply shift which teams are winning awards, not necessarily resulting in opportunities for awards and recognition.”

 

“Our Board is firmly and unanimously convinced that change in overall structure related to classification is neither necessary nor desired,” Board of Control president Jeff Saylor said. “Our current setup is a blend of flexibility and tradition and serves the needs of our student-athletes very well.”

 

KHSAA rebuffs proposal for classes in baseball | USA Today High School Sports | USA Today High School Sports

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In that article, I found this interesting;

 

* Approved the provisional membership of Ashland Holy Family Collegiate, with postseason eligibility to begin in 2017-18 following a two-year candidacy period.

 

1. I am pretty aware of the non-KHSAA schools, especially the small Christian and Catholic ones, and I have NEVER heard of these guys, which surprises me.

 

2. They only go through the 8th grade from the info I found, and are fairly small (143 k-8) so why are they joining the KHSAA?

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I never read the proposal, but from what I've heard from those who have, it was a very well done proposal and make a legitimate case for classes in baseball. And made practical sense in how to do so.

 

To me, the overriding "theme" if you will of the proposal centered on one thing..."we can't win". Boil it all down, and that's exactly what the baseball coach's argument was. And he's not incorrect in his assessment...bigger schools do have more kids with more possibilities of having more arms (pitching). I just think the KHSAA want's/needs to hear more than just the "we can't win, so..." argument.

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I have read the proposal, and it was very well done, and the classes/regions were put together nicely. This is very unfortunate for baseball. To my understanding, there are only two states in the entire country that does not class baseball, and we are one of them. It just makes sense, but the KHSAA doesn't like to do things that make sense obviously.

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Quite frankly after reading the entire text of both the proposal and the KHSAA's publicized response, the decision on this issue was and has been made long before the official proposal was ever submitted. While some of you obviously take issue with the logic of the submitter's proposal (an extremely narrow view and outlandishly limited interpretation by the way IMHO), the response looks to be and frankly IS a canned editorial and a "big school" viewpoint of the current state of the game in the Commonwealth. What is disappointing is the fact that big schools, as a rule, have whined and cried about the "unfair advantages" of private or parochial schools yet go running to the "tradition" response when their superiority in numbers is questioned. The clear and distinct advantages of the larger schools is far more of a hindrance than any supposed edge that the privates may seem to have. Status quo is the haven for cowards and lazy thinkers. Read the proposal in it's entirety and you'll see the rhetoric coming out of Julian's office doesn't even address the issues brought forth. The KHSAA is run by a minority of it's membership that consistently realize the inherent advantages of being in charge. The rest of us be darned.

 

And let me add this fact. At a KHSBCA a couple of years ago, at which I was in attendance, an unscientific, non-secret vote was taken and nearly 80% of those in attendance who voted were in favor of classification. The majority of those opposed were also clearly larger, mostly county based schools. This isn't conjecture, or opinion, this happened. I'm not sure where Julian gets the idea that the change is "not desired" but it seems pretty clear to me that he didn't get it from the people who matter.

Edited by Papa Bear
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Classify baseball and you have to classify basketball and trust me when I say there are those who are not traditionalists who want this. You classify baseball and it's only a matter of time before some small school student hires an attorney who wants to make his/her bones and takes the court route to force classification.

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Classify baseball and you have to classify basketball and trust me when I say there are those who are not traditionalists who want this. You classify baseball and it's only a matter of time before some small school student hires an attorney who wants to make his/her bones and takes the court route to force classification.

 

I've never considered the legal viewpoint. What would the legal claim be?

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Maybe I'm not thinking about it the right way...

But I'm stuck on the statements about it being denied because of the big schools, a big school mentality, etc etc...

I don't understand why the big schools would really care, if it's about dominance.

If you are one of the big dogs, you would still be a big dog.

 

Is it that there wouldn't be smaller whipping posts to pave the way for easier wins into later tournament rounds?

Or an argument about a SINGLE state champion vs multiple champs of different classes?

 

Could it be, from a khsaa perspective, about costs for the additional state tournaments? Extra days at the ball park...

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I've never considered the legal viewpoint. What would the legal claim be?

 

Equal protection. Small schools with non-classified basketball aren't given an equal chance at a state championship as those who participate in classified sports at small schools. The more sports you classify the more credence you give the argument. Not saying that there is real legal basis for it but I can see some attorney wanting to make a name for himself taking it on.

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Maybe I'm not thinking about it the right way...

But I'm stuck on the statements about it being denied because of the big schools, a big school mentality, etc etc...

I don't understand why the big schools would really care, if it's about dominance.

If you are one of the big dogs, you would still be a big dog.

 

Is it that there wouldn't be smaller whipping posts to pave the way for easier wins into later tournament rounds?

Or an argument about a SINGLE state champion vs multiple champs of different classes?

Could it be, from a khsaa perspective, about costs for the additional state tournaments? Extra days at the ball park...

 

 

You hit the nail on the head in my opinion. Remember that with advancement comes higher payouts for participation and attendance as well as the coveted publicity for your school, etc. While that hardly covers all the bases (pun intended), it does go a long way.

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