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Should the "Blade Runner" Be Allowed in the Olympics?


Clyde

Should the "Blade Runner" be allowed to compete in the Olympics?  

27 members have voted

  1. 1. Should the "Blade Runner" be allowed to compete in the Olympics?

    • Yes
      13
    • No
      14


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The International Olympic Committee has thoroughly investigated and found that he has no advantage whatsoever. And this man is not a cyborg; he's a human being. He shouldn't be criticized because he has found a way to overcome his disability and compete on an even ground with athletes that don't have to face the same disadvantages.

 

 

GO OSCAR!!!

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First thing I thought was, if he wins, there's no doubt that China or North Korea will seek out a double amputee to race. Or worse, create a double amputee.

 

Honestly, I say no. Especially, when you do so much to make sure everyone is on a level playing field. Sucks, but that's reality.

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The International Olympic Committee has thoroughly investigated and found that he has no advantage whatsoever. And this man is not a cyborg; he's a human being. He shouldn't be criticized because he has found a way to overcome his disability and compete on an even ground with athletes that don't have to face the same disadvantages.

 

 

GO OSCAR!!!

 

I enjoyed seeing him and love the story. I lean towards no. It may sound strange, but IMO there is an advantage. Fewer moving parts reduces the intangibles. He never has to worry about foot problems, no strains or fatigue from below the calf down, no twist in the ankle from a slight mis step, etc. Every runner he is facing will have muscle fatigue and various issues to their lower leg and foot that he will not deal with. It is more than the obvious weight and amount of spring in his devices.

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I enjoyed seeing him and love the story. I lean towards no. It may sound strange, but IMO there is an advantage. Fewer moving parts reduces the intangibles. He never has to worry about foot problems, no strains or fatigue from below the calf down, no twist in the ankle from a slight mis step, etc. Every runner he is facing will have muscle fatigue and various issues to their lower leg and foot that he will not deal with. It is more than the obvious weight and amount of spring in his devices.

 

I see your point, but where the blades attach to his legs must be less comfortable than God's original design. I'd say he has muscle fatigue and pain in certain areas worse than other runners.

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If it is such an advantage, then the other sprinters can participate in an amputation process similar to Oscar's and get prosthetic legs like his and race. To argue that he has an advantage is misguided, IMO. Other amputee runners with his style of prosthetics participate in the Paralympics; how come other countries don't put their sprinters on the national team? How come they are not setting records that are faster than their Olympic counterparts?

 

The Slippery Slope argument has more merit in my mind. The IOC must be careful to set up specific parameters around Oscar's participation and review future cases individually to determine whether circumstances warrant similar consideration. You can not make a blanket rule that can be skirted.

 

JMO.

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When has has a chance to sprain his ankle, break a toe, or fatigue his "foot" then I'd be more open to it.

 

Slippery slope, indeed.

 

My thoughts as well, I'm not saying in any means does he have it easy but it's cuts out about 1/3 of the variables that can cause runners problems when training or competing.

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When has has a chance to sprain his ankle, break a toe, or fatigue his "foot" then I'd be more open to it.

 

Slippery slope, indeed.

When the others have to learn to balance on two metal poles as they run, as well as go without the tactile sensation of the track, I'd be more open to them.

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If it is such an advantage, then the other sprinters can participate in an amputation process similar to Oscar's and get prosthetic legs like his and race. To argue that he has an advantage is misguided, IMO. Other amputee runners with his style of prosthetics participate in the Paralympics; how come other countries don't put their sprinters on the national team? How come they are not setting records that are faster than their Olympic counterparts?

 

The Slippery Slope argument has more merit in my mind. The IOC must be careful to set up specific parameters around Oscar's participation and review future cases individually to determine whether circumstances warrant similar consideration. You can not make a blanket rule that can be skirted.

 

JMO.

Excellent points!
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