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Is Drinking Forbidden in the Bible?


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Alabama Larry claimed to have scripture to support his stance "against any drinking of alcohol", and I was wondering if that's really the case.

 

I seem to recall Jesus performing the miracle of turning water into wine at the wedding reception.

 

So my two questions are simple:

 

Do you feel drinking alcohol is against God's will/ the Bible?

 

Is there any type of scripture to back up this opinion?

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Alabama Larry claimed to have scripture to support his stance "against any drinking of alcohol", and I was wondering if that's really the case.

 

I seem to recall Jesus performing the miracle of turning water into wine at the wedding reception.

 

So my two questions are simple:

 

Do you feel drinking alcohol is against God's will/ the Bible?

 

Is there any type of scripture to back up this opinion?

 

Well, Jesus changed water to wine. He also drank wine just before dying on the cross. Wine was used as an offering in the Old Testament. So I'd have to say no, it's not wrong. :lol:

 

Scripture never condemns drinking alcohol, but it does condemn excessive drinking.

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Well, Jesus changed water to wine. He also drank wine just before dying on the cross. Wine was used as an offering in the Old Testament. So I'd have to say no, it's not wrong. :lol:

 

Scripture never condemns drinking alcohol, but it does condemn excessive drinking.

 

The bolded is what I've always thought, but AL said he was against drinking alcohol and had scripture to support it, and I'm just not seeing what scripture he's speaking of. Excessively? Absolutely, but that's a far cry from condeming any and all consumption of alcohol.

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Actually, Scripture sometimes encourages consumption of alcohol:

 

* Proverbs 31: 6-7 (alcohol used as a sedative, similar to morphine)

* 1 Timothy 5:23 (used as medicine, similar to Ny-Quil)

* Deuteronomy 14: 24-26 (used in celebration, similar to weddings or New Year's)

 

Of course, it clearly condemns excessive drinking:

 

* Proverbs 20:1 (wine a mocker & beer a brawler)

* Proverbs 23: 19-21 (excessive drinking leading to poverty)

* Proverbs 23: 29-30 (physical & emotional pain)

* Proverbs 23: 31-32 (destructive power)

* Proverbs 23: 33-35 (weakens the will; dulls the senses; can't ever get enough)

* Ephesians 5:18 (clearly forbids drunkenness)

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As Father Pank would say...it's not a sin to be drunk, it's a sin to get drunk. Gluttony is a sin whether it involves alcohol, food, gambling, or just about any other activity.

 

And Jesus was called by his critics a "glutton and a drunkard." Evidently, he wasn't serious enough for them.

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The sin of drunkenness is mentioned either metaphorically or literally more than seventy times in the Bible. For this reason alone, it could not have been altogether uncommon in Biblical times. We have Biblical record of several patriarchs not only partaking of fermented beverages, but considering them a blessing… and a few examples of patriarchs of our faith overindulging in them… and yet, I have no doubt that each of them are (and will be) present in Heaven.

 

There is no reasonable question that overindulging in alcohol is considered a sin. Leaning upon alcohol or any substance rather than investing faith and hope in God to cope with daily struggles is clearly wrong. To be completely objective however, so is overindulging in the consumption of food… gluttony, the pursuit of material goods… greed, the pursuit of sexual gratification outside the proper limits of marriage… lust, fornication, adultery, etc.

 

Nowhere are we instructed to stop eating food except for specified periods of prayer and fasting. Life would be short indeed without any food at all. I do not believe that the occasional feast, such as we enjoy a Thanksgiving qualifies as gluttony in and of itself. Gluttony, at least to me is more of a persistent lifestyle of overeating and basically living to serve one’s flesh.

 

Nowhere are we told to surrender all material goods and run around naked and live outdoors exposed to the elements. Nowhere are we instructed to be celibate within the bonds of marriage, except for periods of prayer and fasting.

 

There are a few things mentioned in the Bible that overdoing is not considered sinful such as the fruit of the Spirit; Love, Joy, Peace, Patience, Kindness, Goodness, Faithfulness, Gentleness and Self-Control.

 

With three notable exceptions, there is no proscription anywhere I can find against moderate and responsible enjoyment of fermented beverages. This is absolutely NOT an endorsement to partake, but a very clear indication that it is not necessarily a sin to do so within reasonable guidelines. The three exceptions I do find are:

 

Nazarites and priests – prior to entering the holy of holies in the temple – are the only two types of people instructed not to drink at all.

 

Being a Nazarite was a very specific spiritual calling to mental, physical and spiritual holiness. The term comes from the Hebrew word nazir meaning "consecrated" or "separated". Two of the more famous Nazarites were Sampson and John the Baptist. If you read the strict requirements of being a Nazarite, they include not partaking of grapes in any form, from fresh fruit to raisins to fresh grape juice, wine and vinegar. According to certain Rabbinical interpretations, there is no prohibition for the nazirite to drink alcoholic beverages not derived from grapes. For the modern teetotaler who might fancy himself to be a present day Nazarite, you’ll need to also quit cutting and combing your hair… at the very least limiting your coiffure activities to once a year.

 

As far as priests, there is nowhere they are instructed to abstain at all times. They are required to be responsible and moderate in everything, including their consumption of wine. They actually would receive a portion of the wine, meat and bread offered in the temple. The only time they are instructed to abstain entirely was prior to entering the Holy of Holies into the presence of God in the temple.

 

Which brings up another point… if fermented grape juice is sinful any time, any where for any body… why is it offered to God in the Temple as a blessing? Why were the priests permitted to partake in their share? Why would Jesus make this his first miracle?

 

The third exception, by a broader sweep is the Apostle Paul’s teaching that anything not done in faith is a sin. Anyone whose own conscience convicts them that drinking alcohol in any form is a sin shouldn’t do it… but it is also wise to not fall into the temptation of judging others who do not share your personal convictions.

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.....The third exception, by a broader sweep is the Apostle Paul’s teaching that anything not done in faith is a sin. Anyone whose own conscience convicts them that drinking alcohol in any form is a sin shouldn’t do it… but it is also wise to not fall into the temptation of judging others who do not share your personal convictions.

 

Sorry to shorten your excellent post, but I really only wanted to speak to the part I left. :lol:

 

This point is an excellent point and one that deserves further discussion, IMO.

 

There are different "triggers" for each of us. So, what is a sin for me, may not be a sin for another. For instance, I absolutely love ice cream. I can eat a half a gallon at one time. That is gluttony. IF I make the decision to eat the ice cream, knowing that I most likely will finish off the carton, that's a sin. However, it's not a sin to eat ice cream for everyone else, just because I can't control myself. And to your very last phrase, it goes back to "Let he without sin cast the first stone."

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Sorry to shorten your excellent post, but I really only wanted to speak to the part I left. :lol:

 

This point is an excellent point and one that deserves further discussion, IMO.

 

There are different "triggers" for each of us. So, what is a sin for me, may not be a sin for another. For instance, I absolutely love ice cream. I can eat a half a gallon at one time. That is gluttony. IF I make the decision to eat the ice cream, knowing that I most likely will finish off the carton, that's a sin. However, it's not a sin to eat ice cream for everyone else, just because I can't control myself. And to your very last phrase, it goes back to "Let he without sin cast the first stone."

 

Just thrilled to be on the same page... :thumb:

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