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Some people may be surprised of what is NOT in the bible


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This should be fun. Please feel free to add your own.

 

1. The bible does not say what type of fruit Adam and Eve ate.

 

2. The bible does not say how many wise men saw the baby Jesus.

 

3. The bible does not say what day of the year Christ was born on.

 

4. The bible does not say what day of the year Christ rose (only what day of the week he rose and that it was during the passover).

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This should be fun. Please feel free to add your own.

 

1. The bible does not say what type of fruit Adam and Eve ate.

 

2. The bible does not say how many wise men saw the baby Jesus.

 

3. The bible does not say what day of the year Christ was born on.

 

4. The bible does not say what day of the year Christ rose (only what day of the week he rose and that it was during the passover).

 

You mean that they didn't decorate pine and cedar trees in Bethlehem during that time? ;)

 

* Yes, I know there are no pine or cedar trees in the ME.

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You mean that they didn't decorate pine and cedar trees in Bethlehem during that time? ;)

 

* Yes, I know there are no pine or cedar trees in the ME.

 

It had to be in winter or the chocolate Santas would melt.

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Slightly off course here because this statement is Biblical but widely misused and misquoted.

 

An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.

 

It should be followed by, "but I say unto you, if any man strikes your one cheek, offer him the other that he may strike it also"

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You mean that they didn't decorate pine and cedar trees in Bethlehem during that time? ;)

 

* Yes, I know there are no pine or cedar trees in the ME.

 

Most Christian holidays were placed on older pagan holidays as to stamp them out.

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"To thine own self be true" is occasionally cited as a Biblical recommendation. In truth, this saying originates in the Shakespearean tragedy Hamlet. Polonius, the older counselor of Prince Hamlet's uncle, King Claudius, is in the midst of dispensing advice to the prince when he speaks forth the famous line: "This above all things: to thine own self be true" (Hamlet, 3.1.81).

Among his platitudes, he also says, "Neither a borrower nor a lender be" (3.1.78) — another saying occasionally mistaken for Scripture.

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"To thine own self be true" is occasionally cited as a Biblical recommendation. In truth, this saying originates in the Shakespearean tragedy Hamlet. Polonius, the older counselor of Prince Hamlet's uncle, King Claudius, is in the midst of dispensing advice to the prince when he speaks forth the famous line: "This above all things: to thine own self be true" (Hamlet, 3.1.81).

Among his platitudes, he also says, "Neither a borrower nor a lender be" (3.1.78) — another saying occasionally mistaken for Scripture.

 

 

I had no idea that anyone ever thought that was scripture! :eek: Seriously! The interesting thing to me here is that people would confuse Shakespeare and scripture.

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Spare the rod and spoil the child is not a biblical proverb. I believe it is a Benjamin Franklin proverb.

 

The Bible actually says

 

Proverbs 13:24 (New International Version)

New International Version (NIV)

Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984 by International Bible Society

 

 

 

24 He who spares the rod hates his son,

but he who loves him is careful to discipline him.

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