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See Table 8-

(it is on page 8 of the report, but page 20 of the PDF file).

 

Table 8 outlines the "Per Pupil Amounts for Current Spending of Public Elementary-Secondary School Systems by State: 2005-06"

 

In the United States row, under Total, the report says that, per pupil, the government spends $9,138. Per student.

 

I went to private schools all my life, and tuition was never even close to that much. My tuition at the University of Kentucky is not even close to that.

 

What if parents were given a $9,138 tuition grant? They could pick which school for their child to attend. Schools would be put in competition with each other to see who could attract the most students. Bad teachers would be fired, and bad schools would fail. But our education system would improve.

 

I'm sure there are other arguments against this aside from the absurd amount of money that is put into education that leads to (some) horrible schools. Let's get a discussion going.

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See Table 8-

(it is on page 8 of the report, but page 20 of the PDF file).

 

Table 8 outlines the "Per Pupil Amounts for Current Spending of Public Elementary-Secondary School Systems by State: 2005-06"

 

In the United States row, under Total, the report says that, per pupil, the government spends $9,138. Per student.

 

I went to private schools all my life, and tuition was never even close to that much. My tuition at the University of Kentucky is not even close to that.

 

What if parents were given a $9,138 tuition grant? They could pick which school for their child to attend. Schools would be put in competition with each other to see who could attract the most students. Bad teachers would be fired, and bad schools would fail. But our education system would improve.

 

I'm sure there are other arguments against this aside from the absurd amount of money that is put into education that leads to (some) horrible schools. Let's get a discussion going.

 

That number is not true of every student in the state of Kentucky. You also have to consider that some of that money is boosted because students who are special ed. recieve more federal assistance as do students who qualify for free and reduced lunch.

 

FWIW, I would support school vouchers, only if schools were required to take ALL children regardless of anything, and could not easily kick them out because of behavior, attendance, failing grades, or mental health issues.

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FWIW, I would support school vouchers, only if schools were required to take ALL children regardless of anything, and could not easily kick them out because of behavior, attendance, failing grades, or mental health issues.

 

I feel the same as Ace.:thumb:

 

 

Someone help Ace off the floor, please.:p:D;):lol:

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What if parents were given a $9,138 tuition grant? They could pick which school for their child to attend. Schools would be put in competition with each other to see who could attract the most students. Bad teachers would be fired, and bad schools would fail. But our education system would improve.

 

In theory vouchers are a good thing, but I do have a couple questions. What about schools in areas that aren't attractive to quality teachers? Would anyone want to send their children there?

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If parents were given $5,000 vouchers, with the remaining funding left for the public schools in their districts, then the loss of students to private schools would be more than offset. Public schools and the NEA fear competition and do not want to lose their political influence on young minds. As long as the NEA is opposed to vouchers, most politicians will also be opposed to them.

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If parents were given $5,000 vouchers, with the remaining funding left for the public schools in their districts, then the loss of students to private schools would be more than offset. Public schools and the NEA fear competition and do not want to lose their political influence on young minds. As long as the NEA is opposed to vouchers, most politicians will also be opposed to them.

 

Thanks for the clarification. I think that better answers my question.:thumb:

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I don't fear competition. I think competition is a good thing, which is why I like the school choice plans in the JCPS system (of which I am a proud product.)

 

What I fear are conservatives who lately claim they're trying to 'fix' public schools when for about 60 years before they were trying to supplant or destroy them. Same with social security- when your party openly plots to 'starve the beast', you aren't likely to be seen as the right choice for keeping it solvent.

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In theory vouchers are a good thing, but I do have a couple questions. What about schools in areas that aren't attractive to quality teachers? Would anyone want to send their children there?

Make those schools the best... you think it's any accident that the best schools in Jefferson County are in the city and not the county?

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I don't fear competition. I think competition is a good thing, which is why I like the school choice plans in the JCPS system (of which I am a proud product.)

 

What I fear are conservatives who lately claim they're trying to 'fix' public schools when for about 60 years before they were trying to supplant or destroy them. Same with social security- when your party openly plots to 'starve the beast', you aren't likely to be seen as the right choice for keeping it solvent.

02, you are one of the smartest posters on this board, and sorry to be brash, but this post is fairly ridiculous..

 

First of all, you are against fixing public schools because of what happened over the last 60 years? Parties change- Reagan changed the Republicans. Either way, all that matters is the proposed policies now.

 

Second of all, you want hypocrisy? Bill and Hilary Clinton speak out against school choice, and send their kids to Sidwell Friends. Al Gore said "'If I was a parent of a child who went to an inner-city school that was failing . . . I might be for vouchers, too.'", but sends his kids to private schools. Apparently, he supports school choice, but only for the rich. But John Edwards is my personal favorite here-

John Edwards, Mr. Populist, decries that "America has two school systems -- one for the affluent and one for everyone else." He should know. When he joined the U.S. Senate he sent his children to a religious school because, according to USA Today, the D.C. "public schools are deeply troubled." Mr. Edwards, however, opposes private school choice for low-income families on the curious grounds that this would "drain resources" from public schools. By such logic Mr. Edwards himself "drained" approximately $132,000 from the D.C. public schools.

 

I agree that the JCPS has done well (correct me if I am wrong, but they have done open enrollment to enable competition, right?) But IMO that is a step in the right direction, but not good enough.

 

Whatever needs to be done, the teachers' union needs to have as little power as possible. Bad teachers need to be fired, and tenure rules and such do not allow it. School vouchers will A) allow parents to be involved in their child's education; B) pit the schools against each other; C) (hopefully) save the taxpayers money on education; and D) get bad teachers on the hot seat.

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That number is not true of every student in the state of Kentucky. You also have to consider that some of that money is boosted because students who are special ed. recieve more federal assistance as do students who qualify for free and reduced lunch.

 

FWIW, I would support school vouchers, only if schools were required to take ALL children regardless of anything, and could not easily kick them out because of behavior, attendance, failing grades, or mental health issues.

 

Catholic schools have those students as well, and they don't charge them any more than a typical student. They have special teachers, and spend money they don't on typical students.

 

I wasn't aware they were kicking kids out with "mental issues". I'm not even sure if I have ever seen a kid "fail out" of catholic schools before. Many do very poorly and opt for another route, but aren't kicked out. Now behavior issues, that's a different story, as it should be.

 

Public school don't kick out failing kids (just send them to alternative school)or teachers it would seem, though Berman is trying to rectify that last one here in Louisville, and it meeting much resistance.

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Catholic schools have those students as well, and they don't charge them any more than a typical student. They have special teachers, and spend money they don't on typical students.

 

I wasn't aware they were kicking kids out with "mental issues". I'm not even sure if I have ever seen a kid "fail out" of catholic schools before. Many do very poorly and opt for another route, but aren't kicked out. Now behavior issues, that's a different story, as it should be.

 

Public school don't kick out failing kids (just send them to alternative school)or teachers it would seem, though Berman is trying to rectify that last one here in Louisville, and it meeting much resistance.

 

I am sorry but at least in my area, no they don't. THey don't have the kids that are court ordered to be in school. They don't have the severly mentally handicapped. You might have some LD kids but you do not have all those type of kids.

 

The principal of a private school in our area told our principal is that the big difference between his job and our principal's job was when they didn't want a kid anymore, he had the checkbook to return their tuition and then can send him to our school.

 

THe public schools are the ones that are funding and maintaining the alternative schools. ANd those kids test scores count the identical amount as the Valedictorians test scores.

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I am sorry but at least in my area, no they don't. THey don't have the kids that are court ordered to be in school. They don't have the severly mentally handicapped. You might have some LD kids but you do not have all those type of kids.

 

The principal of a private school in our area told our principal is that the big difference between his job and our principal's job was when they didn't want a kid anymore, he had the checkbook to return their tuition and then can send him to our school.

 

THe public schools are the ones that are funding and maintaining the alternative schools. ANd those kids test scores count the identical amount as the Valedictorians test scores.

Taxpayers, including those who send their kids to private schools and the employees of private schools, fund alternative schools. I know that this is not news to you, LBBC, but many critics of private schools seem to forget that public schools are recipients of funding - not sources of funding.
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Taxpayers, including those who send their kids to private schools and the employees of private schools, fund alternative schools. I know that this is not news to you, LBBC, but many critics of private schools seem to forget that public schools are recipients of funding - not sources of funding.

 

My point is that somehow critics of public schools see the alternative schools as some separate identities that are not tied to the public school. Jefferson County may be different as it is one school, I believe, but in other schools around the state it is operated through the funds the public school district receives.

 

So, they have to deduct out of the money they receive from taxpayers the funds (along with quickly reducing Safe Schools Grant money) to operate the school. In my case, the HS lost a teaching position to have an alternative school.

 

In addition, those students' (some court-ordered to be in school and at the alternative school along with those appointed by the HS and MS) test scores count in the HS test scores just like any other student attending the HS.

 

They do not have the option to have their test scores look artificially high because they don't have to deal with students who DO NOT want to be at school but are being forced to be there by the courts.

 

Now, I say that and it sounds like I am complaining but I am not. The kids SHOULD be forced to be in school and alternative schools are needed to deal with those type of students.

 

But it rankles me when a private school supporter gets on here and goes on about how their students are so much better but they do not attempt or HAVE to educate ALL the different types of students that public schools do.

 

Private schools are wonderful creatures and I would support vouchers to allow more parents to have them as an option.

 

But public schools are needed as well to deal with the students that private schools are not adept or choose not to handle.

 

And private schools are NOT, in general, better schools than public schools.

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