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Mother Gets Five Years For...


Clyde
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5 years for "stealing" education.

 

Homeless woman used the address of her babysitter to get her so. In a better school.

 

Police charged her with stealing $15k of education. 5 years.

 

Rapist at Stanford got a slap on the wrist.

 

 

Homeless mother Tanya McDowell who sent son, 6, to better school in wrong town jailed for five years | Daily Mail Online

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Last thought for now. If this was prosecuted every where, would every person in the country illegally and sending a child to school also possibly be guilty?

 

What percentage of parents of High Athletes in Kentucky would go to prison for using wrong address to send kid to a different school...people can act dimb, but this goes on at just about every school.

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Last thought for now. If this was prosecuted every where, would every person in the country illegally and sending a child to school also possibly be guilty?

 

What percentage of parents of High Athletes in Kentucky would go to prison for using wrong address to send kid to a different school...people can act dimb, but this goes on at just about every school.

Can we get someone from Ft. Thomas to weigh in? :walk:

 

 

 

 

Just kidding, relax. :D

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Last thought for now. If this was prosecuted every where, would every person in the country illegally and sending a child to school also possibly be guilty?

 

What percentage of parents of High Athletes in Kentucky would go to prison for using wrong address to send kid to a different school...people can act dimb, but this goes on at just about every school.

 

No, they would get extra benefits.

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Tanya McDowell, the Bridgeport mom arrested for sending her 5-year-old son to a Norwalk elementary school and while out on bond was picked up for selling drugs to undercover officers five times, was sentenced to five years in prison and another five years of probation after pleading guilty to drug and larceny charges.

 

In April [2011], McDowell received national sympathy from education advocates after Norwalk police arrested her for sending her son to Brookside Elementary School in Norwalk while they alleged that she was really living in Bridgeport.

 

McDowell claimed that she was homeless at the time — spending many nights in her van — and wanted a good education for her son, A.J., while she was working in Stamford.

 

Several weeks later, she was arrested for selling drugs to Norwalk undercover officers on five occasions in Norwalk and Bridgeport.

 

When she was picked up on the drug charges, police found her in front of Brookside Elementary School holding 30 small bags of marijuana and 23 small bags of crack cocaine, prosecutor Tiffany Lockshier said during her sentencing hearing

 

Another article reported that a judge admonished McDowell for conflating the distinctly separate charges during a 2012 court appearance:

 

"Who would have thought that wanting a good education for my son would put me in this predicament?" McDowell lamented as she stood handcuffed before Superior Court Judge Frank Iannotti. "I have no regrets seeking a better education for him, I do regret my participation in this drug case."

 

The 34-year-old Bridgeport woman pleaded guilty in a Norwalk court to charges of first-degree larceny and conspiracy to commit first-degree larceny for illegally enrolling her 6-year-old son in Norwalk public school despite living here.

 

That case drew protests by residents and civil rights groups who claimed McDowell was being persecuted for her attempt to get a better education for her son.

 

Iannotti retorted that the Norwalk case had nothing to do with why McDowell was before him.

 

"This case is about the convictions for the sale of narcotics to an undercover police officer," the judge said. "I think you understand that because that is really the essence of what has gotten you into the predicament you find yourself today."

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Tanya McDowell, the Bridgeport mom arrested for sending her 5-year-old son to a Norwalk elementary school and while out on bond was picked up for selling drugs to undercover officers five times, was sentenced to five years in prison and another five years of probation after pleading guilty to drug and larceny charges.

 

In April [2011], McDowell received national sympathy from education advocates after Norwalk police arrested her for sending her son to Brookside Elementary School in Norwalk while they alleged that she was really living in Bridgeport.

 

McDowell claimed that she was homeless at the time — spending many nights in her van — and wanted a good education for her son, A.J., while she was working in Stamford.

 

Several weeks later, she was arrested for selling drugs to Norwalk undercover officers on five occasions in Norwalk and Bridgeport.

 

When she was picked up on the drug charges, police found her in front of Brookside Elementary School holding 30 small bags of marijuana and 23 small bags of crack cocaine, prosecutor Tiffany Lockshier said during her sentencing hearing

 

Another article reported that a judge admonished McDowell for conflating the distinctly separate charges during a 2012 court appearance:

 

"Who would have thought that wanting a good education for my son would put me in this predicament?" McDowell lamented as she stood handcuffed before Superior Court Judge Frank Iannotti. "I have no regrets seeking a better education for him, I do regret my participation in this drug case."

 

The 34-year-old Bridgeport woman pleaded guilty in a Norwalk court to charges of first-degree larceny and conspiracy to commit first-degree larceny for illegally enrolling her 6-year-old son in Norwalk public school despite living here.

 

That case drew protests by residents and civil rights groups who claimed McDowell was being persecuted for her attempt to get a better education for her son.

 

Iannotti retorted that the Norwalk case had nothing to do with why McDowell was before him.

 

"This case is about the convictions for the sale of narcotics to an undercover police officer," the judge said. "I think you understand that because that is really the essence of what has gotten you into the predicament you find yourself today."

 

 

And now you know, the rest of the story.

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