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Missouri Law: Teachers Cannot Be "Friends" With Students


Clyde
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This seems like a positive. :idunno:

 

:thumb: It is very positive. I give out information on every extracurricular activity that I am involved with. Most recently, I was able to get out information about a meeting that we were having with our senior class last week via Facebook. I routinely (at least weekly) answer questions about homework that way.

 

The key is that I have a relationship of respect with my students at all times. Why would Facebook be any different? In the case of students (mostly former students) that might have questionable material in their statuses, I just "hide" their status updates.

 

I have no problem with teachers that choose a different approach to Facebook. If they cannot handle a professional interaction with kids on Facebook, then they shouldn't "friend" them. However, it is absurd to say that nothing good can happen from it.

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This seems like a positive. :idunno:

 

Age has alot to do with it. I see no way a young teacher should do it. There are other ways to communicate with students. Everyone has an email. I'm 5 years older than my oldest students, getting on facebook with them would but a dent in the student-teacher relationship IMO.

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:thumb: It is very positive. I give out information on every extracurricular activity that I am involved with. Most recently, I was able to get out information about a meeting that we were having with our senior class last week via Facebook. I routinely (at least weekly) answer questions about homework that way.

 

The key is that I have a relationship of respect with my students at all times. Why would Facebook be any different? In the case of students (mostly former students) that might have questionable material in their statuses, I just "hide" their status updates.

 

I have no problem with teachers that choose a different approach to Facebook. If they cannot handle a professional interaction with kids on Facebook, then they shouldn't "friend" them. However, it is absurd to say that nothing good can happen from it.

I think you are making excellent use of a communication tool that kids will pay attention to. Ok--it may not be for everyone, but handled the right way (Public-Appropriate-Non-sexual), it is a great way to reach the kids.

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:thumb: It is very positive. I give out information on every extracurricular activity that I am involved with. Most recently, I was able to get out information about a meeting that we were having with our senior class last week via Facebook. I routinely (at least weekly) answer questions about homework that way.

 

The key is that I have a relationship of respect with my students at all times. Why would Facebook be any different? In the case of students (mostly former students) that might have questionable material in their statuses, I just "hide" their status updates.

 

I have no problem with teachers that choose a different approach to Facebook. If they cannot handle a professional interaction with kids on Facebook, then they shouldn't "friend" them. However, it is absurd to say that nothing good can happen from it.

 

Could you do the same via blogs? Free to set up. Comments/questions can be made.

 

It eliminates all of the downside IMO.

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Could you do the same via blogs? Free to set up. Comments/questions can be made.

 

It eliminates all of the downside IMO.

 

That's what I'm saying. Sure it could be very helpful in some aspects. But the negatives far outway the positives IMO. Other than being able to help students ASAP, I think everything else is negative. Don't get me wrong I do want my students to like me, but I want them to like me because they feel that I have their best interest at heart and that I'm a respectable person and not because I get down on their level by facebooking, texting, etc. with them. Not saying that is what True Blue is doing but we all know of teachers who do this.

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Could you do the same via blogs? Free to set up. Comments/questions can be made.

 

It eliminates all of the downside IMO.

 

My students don't tend to "blog" so, no. Facebook is how students communicate. Also, aren't all blog comments public? Many students don't want others to know that they don't understand something.

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My students don't tend to "blog" so, no. Facebook is how students communicate. Also, aren't all blog comments public? Many students don't want others to know that they don't understand something.

 

Are you not the least bit afraid of the types of things students could do on FB to get you in trouble? Can I get your age bracket?

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My students don't tend to "blog" so, no. Facebook is how students communicate. Also, aren't all blog comments public? Many students don't want others to know that they don't understand something.

 

If I'm a student and my goal is to find information that my teacher so kindly makes available I'm going to go to where that info is.

 

As to your last point, I suggest they send an email. FB isn't the vehicle for private comments.

 

I see nothing that FB offers that cannot be easily handled in another manner.

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If I'm a student and my goal is to find information that my teacher so kindly makes available I'm going to go to where that info is.

 

As to your last point, I suggest they send an email. FB isn't the vehicle for private comments.

 

I see nothing that FB offers that cannot be easily handled in another manner.

 

That's fine if you or others want to do it that way. Students are already ON Facebook. They don't have to go someplace else for help.

 

One thing that works great for me is that I have my inbox messages sent to my phone. As a result, no matter where I am at, when students (or friends) send me messages, I get a text that I can respond to immediately.

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Are you not the least bit afraid of the types of things students could do on FB to get you in trouble? Can I get your age bracket?

 

I am 37. If you would like to "friend" me on Facebook and see the interactions I have with students (minus inbox messages, of course) I'd be happy to do so.

 

Only I can get myself in trouble. Any trouble that students could stir up for me on FB they could do in other ways, if that was their intention.

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I am 37. If you would like to "friend" me on Facebook and see the interactions I have with students (minus inbox messages, of course) I'd be happy to do so.

 

Only I can get myself in trouble. Any trouble that students could stir up for me on FB they could do in other ways, if that was their intention.

Your students are very fortunate to have a concerned, available teacher with their best interest in mind. Kudos to you!

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I am with TB&G on this one.

 

Clyde, I think TB&G has you on this one, yes you can use other mediums but they wouldn't be as efficient or inclusive.

 

How about we crush the teachers that step out of line instead of playing big brother.

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I am with TB&G on this one.

 

Clyde, I think TB&G has you on this one, yes you can use other mediums but they wouldn't be as efficient or inclusive.

 

How about we crush the teachers that step out of line instead of playing big brother.

 

It's not a matter of what medium the student uses.

 

Think about it. By that argument you wouldn't have them use a book because kids don't read anymore. You'd just post everything on FB.

 

Kids will go where they HAVE to go in order to do what they HAVE to do. I don't in any way question the thought behind TB&G and, in fact, I applaud her for going above and beyond.

 

G, as to your "they wouldn't be efficient or inclusive, I simply disagree. Again, the students will go where they have to go.

 

The bigger point is that an administrator/principal/superintendent has to look at the big picture. He obviously doesn't have to worry about TB&G and her motives. However, he/she has to look at what's best for the school/district and IMO that means no teachers friending students on FB. Again, due to there being viable alternatives to FB (I'd challenge anyone to point out why a student would not go to a blog if that's where the info is) AND because FB opens up a whole can of potential big, fat, and ugly worms it's simply not a smart move by the district to allow it. One lawsuit over a teacher being inappropriate in some way due to interactions on FB is all it takes to prove my point.

 

We THEN crush that teacher and say "that's why we don't friend students on FB."

 

99% of the teachers are like TB&G. They do it for the right reason. I , as an administrator, have to cognizant of and make rules for that 1%. No different than any other aspect in life that we already deal with.

 

As always, I'm open to suggestions as to where I'm wrong.

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