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Rule Question


redsfan

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A runner may not hurdle, jump over, or leap over a fielder unless the fielder is lying prone on the ground. Penalty: The runner is out, but the ball remains alive unless the umpire calls interference. Note: Jumping over a kneeling fielder is illegal.

 

NFHS 8-4-2-b-2

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I understand the rules in high school to protect catchers, but I do think they're pretty cheap at times given that they are still blocking the plate like players that don't have that kind of protection. Exactly what are you supposed to do?

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I understand the rules in high school to protect catchers, but I do think they're pretty cheap at times given that they are still blocking the plate like players that don't have that kind of protection. Exactly what are you supposed to do?

 

Catchers are treated no differently than any other player. No player may block the plate or any base without possession of the ball. If the fielder is in possession of the ball they can deny access to the base or plate.

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Catchers are treated no differently than any other player. No player may block the plate or any base without possession of the ball. If the fielder is in possession of the ball they can deny access to the base or plate.

 

 

And the bold are the key words indeed rjs4470! If they have possession, it is a completely different story! :thumb::thumb:

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And the bold are the key words indeed rjs4470! If they have possession, it is a completely different story! :thumb::thumb:

 

Yep, the distinction is the important part of the rule...it's all about possession. Without the ball, the correct call is obstruction (not interference....interference can only be committed by the hitting team). It is not a dead ball and play may continue. While play continues, the umpire decides what base the obstructed runner would have reached without the obstruction taking place. The obstructed runner is now "protected" until he reaches that base. When playing action stops, the ball will become dead and the runner will be awarded that base if he has not reached it. If he was put out before he reaches that base, that out will be nullified and he will be awarded that base. If the runner reaches that base safely, the obstruction is ignored. The tough part of this call, and the reason you don't see it called often is because if the runner can touch any part of the base, he is considered to have access.....even if it's only a small corner of the base. It's almost impossible to call with only two umpires (or only one in JV and Freshman games) simply because it's too hard to see without being right in front of the base. And honestly, unless the fielder is kneeling in front of the base, it's hard to completely deny access to the base. In over 35 years of my playing and coaching at the youth, high school, college level I've only seen this called a handful of times, and most of those times were incorrect.

 

The rule in major league baseball is even more confusing, as there are two types of obstruction.

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Sitch:

 

R1 is on third with no outs. R1 attempts to score on a flyball to F8. F8’s throw to F2 is near perfect. R1 sees that the play is going to be close. As F2 stretches for the ball to tag R1, R1 attempts to hurdle F2’s outstretched arms as the ball bounces in front of the plate and skips into dead-ball territory. As R1 is in the air, F2’s glove catches R1’s foot and both lose their balance and tumble to the ground. R1 crawls back and touches the plate.

 

What ya got, blue?

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Sitch:

 

R1 is on third with no outs. R1 attempts to score on a flyball to F8. F8’s throw to F2 is near perfect. R1 sees that the play is going to be close. As F2 stretches for the ball to tag R1, R1 attempts to hurdle F2’s outstretched arms as the ball bounces in front of the plate and skips into dead-ball territory. As R1 is in the air, F2’s glove catches R1’s foot and both lose their balance and tumble to the ground. R1 crawls back and touches the plate.

 

 

 

What ya got, blue?

 

Looks like HS Algebra to me. :lol:

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Looks like HS Algebra to me. :lol:

 

agreed......Here's the easy formula:

 

Cosign R1 = jersey # of F1/(jersey # of R2 - price of the hot dog at the concession stand) * (jersey # of F2 - number of argued balls and strikes during the game)

 

where Cosign R1 is also equal to the number of scheduled games over 36.

 

You will grade your own paper ........

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