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Mitchell Report Players Black Balled?


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http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=3437067

 

 

These are tough times for unemployed players named in the Mitchell report trying to find work in baseball, whether they happen to be a home run king such as Barry Bonds or a 31-year-old such as Jay Gibbons or an extra outfielder, such as Nook Logan.

 

 

The agent for Barry Bonds says that no team is interested in his client -- not even for a minimum salary -- and the circumstances for the lack of offers make him "suspicious."

 

 

 

Gibbons sent a letter to all 30 teams last month asking for a chance in the form of a minor league contract. He even went so far as to offer to donate his salary to charity. But he has been offered no opportunities.

 

 

 

Logan, linked to former New York Mets batboy Kirk Radomski on Page 229 of the Mitchell report, is still out of baseball, at age 28, despite having 56 steals and a .268 batting average in 321 games with the Detroit Tigers and Washington Nationals.

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This is the letter that Gibbons wrote....

 

Writing this letter is both painful and humiliating. It has been almost six weeks since my release from the Orioles and I am still unable to land any opportunity at a second chance to play the game that I love.

 

I am young, healthy and determined. I have acknowledged and apologized for the mistake that I made and writing this letter should be proof enough that I have indeed suffered for my mistake.

 

I have faith and hope that some team will give me the chance to prove that I can not only be a productive player but also be a stellar member of their organization. My faith in a second chance has inspired me to work harder than I have at any time in my life. My faith has gotten me through this most difficult period in my life.

 

All I need is a chance -- any chance -- anywhere. I am more than willing to begin the process of proving that I can and will be a productive major league player by playing in the minor leagues.

 

As you know, I have played seven seasons in the big leagues and have hit 20-plus homeruns in three seasons and have hit .277 in three seasons (2003, 2005 and 2006). At 31 years old, I have NO DOUBT that my best baseball is ahead of me.

 

I know that my agents at ACES have tried to land me an opportunity in the minor leagues but have been met with negative responses by each and every Organization. I am not blind to the fact that I have made a mistake and that mistake has raised doubt about my character and ability. It is important that you know that my indiscretions, while regretful, were made in an effort to heal a nagging wrist injury. I would encourage you to speak with anyone in this game, including players, coaches, front office etc. who know me. I am confident that everyone you speak with will vouch for my character.

 

I respectfully and humbly request that you grant me the chance to play for your organization.

 

I am so willing to prove myself as a player, and a person, that I will donate ALL of my minor league earnings to your Club's charity. In the event that I earn the right to play at the major league level, I will gladly donate a significant sum to that same charity.

 

Once again, all I need is a chance and I will prove that I can be an extremely productive player and a great addition to your organization.

 

Please feel free to contact me directly [phone numbers redacted].

 

Thank you for your time and consideration.

 

Sincerely,

 

Jay Gibbons

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I really feel collusion could be argued in the case of Bonds, and possibly others. Bonds would be twice as vaulable as a DH than the majority of the DHs currently playing. He gets on base at least every other at bat and is still feared by virtually every pitcher. An organization may not want to bring along the media circus of Bonds, but that has subsided since passing Hank Aaron.

 

It would be the hypocritcal mindset of a lifetime to say these teams do not want these players because of past steroid use, when these organizations are just as responsible for the steroid era.

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I have no sympathy for these guys, they screwed up and now they're paying for it. I don't remember anyone saying forgiveness was a given from baseball teams. Who cares that he wrote a letter, he used steroids and help taint the game of baseball, he must not love it that much.

 

As for Bonds, not only is steroids a big problem but he is probably the worst clubhouse teammate in sports. He is a major distraction to any team that is trying to contend and teams today are trying to stray away from those players. Yes I'm sure steroids is a big part of it too but I can understand any team that does not want Bonds on their team.

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I really feel collusion could be argued in the case of Bonds, and possibly others. Bonds would be twice as vaulable as a DH than the majority of the DHs currently playing. He gets on base at least every other at bat and is still feared by virtually every pitcher. An organization may not want to bring along the media circus of Bonds, but that has subsided since passing Hank Aaron.

 

It would be the hypocritcal mindset of a lifetime to say these teams do not want these players because of past steroid use, when these organizations are just as responsible for the steroid era.

 

Rather than collusion, I see this more as baseball owners collectively agreeing they do not want to overpay millions and millions of dollars for a pouty, poor-fielding, over-aged, poor-running, oft-injured, shell-of-himself-without-the-steroids, out-of-shape player. He won't hit many HR's and, yeah, he will get on base via walk occasionally, but it doesn't help much if he can't run. If he would be willing to play for a pittance, that would be one thing. But he'll still think he commands top dollar and no one will pay him that.

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Rather than collusion, I see this more as baseball owners collectively agreeing they do not want to overpay millions and millions of dollars for a pouty, poor-fielding, over-aged, poor-running, oft-injured, shell-of-himself-without-the-steroids, out-of-shape player. He won't hit many HR's and, yeah, he will get on base via walk occasionally, but it doesn't help much if he can't run. If he would be willing to play for a pittance, that would be one thing. But he'll still think he commands top dollar and no one will pay him that.

 

 

Poor-fielding would not matter as DH. "Shell-of-himself"... all I know is that the guy was pretty darn productive last season considering the amount of games he actually played. Heck of a lot more productive than many DHs. You guys are kidding yourself if you think Bonds would not be a legit DH, despite his physical problems. I know he is a jerk and his image is horrible, but the guy can still get it done, imo.

 

Baseball is the king of sports for overpaying for athletes because they are more heavily relied upon for attendance (and revenue sharing) than any other sport. From my understanding, these guys are not even given a chance, and it sounds as if their asking price is pretty darn low right now yet they still are looking for work.

 

I am not denying the owners may be thinking some of things you mentioned, but I still contend that is ultra-hypochritical of them considering they are just as, if not more guilty than some of the steroid users.

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Seriously though, if an owner really thought Bonds would help push their team to the playoffs, don't you think they'd do so? Sure, he'd be a decent DH, but not at the price he'd want. Plus, who needs all the distraction of a Bonds (let's not forget he's facing criminal charges) when a team is trying to get focused on a playoff run.

 

I hate these steroid abusers, but I do feel bad for the Gibbons guy. Seems truly repentent . . . .

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^Bonds agent said no one will even offer him a league minimum deal.

 

As if he'd really play for it anyways . . . :rolleyes:

 

And it probably has a much to do with the fact that no one wants a distraction and royal pain-in-the-butt like him around a team trying to come together for a pennant run.

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Seriously though, if an owner really thought Bonds would help push their team to the playoffs, do't you think they'd do so? Sure, he'd be a decent DH, but not at the price he'd want. Plus, who needs all the distraction of a Bonds (let's not forget he's facing criminal charges) when a team is trying to get focused on a playoff run.

 

I hate these steroid abusers, but I do feel bad for the Gibbons guy. Seems truly repentent . . . .

If Bonds is serious about playing, he is not going to demand an enomormous amount of money... I could be wrong on that.

 

I think he would be a solid addition to a team like the D-Rays. Who is their DH? Johnny Gomes? He would be a lot better than him.

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If Bonds is serious about playing, he is not going to demand an enomormous amount of money... I could be wrong on that.

 

I think he would be a solid addition to a team like the D-Rays. Who is their DH? Johnny Gomes? He would be a lot better than him.

 

Oakland, maybe also?

 

I just don't see an ego like Bonds playing for anything less than a king's ransom.

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As if he'd really play for it anyways . . . :rolleyes:

 

And it probably has a much to do with the fact that no one wants a distraction and royal pain-in-the-butt like him around a team trying to come together for a pennant run.

We are talking about pro athletes here. Half of these guys are royal pain-in-the-butts. In a world of T.O.'s, Chad Johnson's, etc., I have no doubt Bonds would have a spot on a roster.

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People don't care about that stuff. They want to see a winner on the field no matter how you get it done. If he could come to Cincy and make them a better team I say go for it.

 

Owners, GM's and coaches most certainly care about that stuff . . .

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