Jump to content

Girls sports - Why are private schools so much stronger than in boys sports?


 Share

Recommended Posts

Across the board in girls sports, private schools are traditionally very strong. Assumption, Notre Dame in volleyball, several schools in soccer, Lex Cath, Sacred Heart, Notre Dame, Mercy, CAL in basketball, etc, etc.

 

Why are girls' sports so much more dominated by private schools than boys sports are?

 

Guru started the thread on basketball and that is a great example. Basketball has been dominated the past 7-8 years by Sacred Heart and Lex Catholic.

 

I know you will be surprised to learn, I have some opinions but would like to hear others first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 41
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Across the board in girls sports, private schools are traditionally very strong. Assumption, Notre Dame in volleyball, several schools in soccer, Lex Cath, Sacred Heart, Notre Dame, Mercy, CAL in basketball, etc, etc.

 

Why are girls' sports so much more dominated by private schools than boys sports are?

 

Guru started the thread on basketball and that is a great example. Basketball has been dominated the past 7-8 years by Sacred Heart and Lex Catholic.

 

I know you will be surprised to learn, I have some opinions but would like to hear others first.

 

IMO, the private schools are able to emphasize on girls sports, because most of them are single-sex schools. In addition, all the private schools, including the co-ed ones, put a strong and equal emphasis and incredible support into the girls sports.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would tend to think that the private school girls are almost all on an AAU team. They develop their skills with their teammates and thus they dominate. While there are some in the public school that do AAU basketball, generally you don't see a great majority of one team together.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a very, VERY uninformed idea- just want to throw things out for discussion. This may be an idea for your Title IX statement in the other thread Lbbc.

I can't speak for single sex private schools.

In a Title IX audit, a school with a football team as large as Lexington Catholics can put a strain on trying to keep boys and girls sports as equal as possible, since there is not another sport that I know of that can have 80-90 participants.

For football- some players are counted multiple times. A freshman is counted once for being on the freshmen team, once as a JV player, and once as a Varsity player.

I would say that Lexington Catholic places uber-attention and commitment to thier girls sports, so they can fit into Title IX. In major Division-1 colleges, Title IX is figured in without the sport of football, but in Ky High school it is not. Not saying that public schools with large football teams cant do this, just throwing out what I see.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Better Feeder programs, IMO. Private schools seem more apt to be involved with cometitive leagues and AAU instead of in-school recreation programs. Some schools view inner county rec. programs as a feeder, yet in reality the competition isn't good enough. It's great for skills, but not for competetion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a very, VERY uninformed idea- just want to throw things out for discussion. This may be an idea for your Title IX statement in the other thread Lbbc.

I can't speak for single sex private schools.

In a Title IX audit, a school with a football team as large as Lexington Catholics can put a strain on trying to keep boys and girls sports as equal as possible, since there is not another sport that I know of that can have 80-90 participants.

For football- some players are counted multiple times. A freshman is counted once for being on the freshmen team, once as a JV player, and once as a Varsity player.

I would say that Lexington Catholic places uber-attention and commitment to thier girls sports, so they can fit into Title IX. In major Division-1 colleges, Title IX is figured in without the sport of football, but in Ky High school it is not. Not saying that public schools with large football teams cant do this, just throwing out what I see.

There is a formula that is used for football. I don't know the formula but I do know you do not have to spend $1 for $1 or player for player in football to a girls sports.

 

Also, I believe each player is only counted once per sport.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Better Feeder programs, IMO. Private schools seem more apt to be involved with cometitive leagues and AAU instead of in-school recreation programs. Some schools view inner county rec. programs as a feeder, yet in reality the competition isn't good enough. It's great for skills, but not for competetion.

BEST post I have read. The job for the rec program is to provide a sport for everyone to play not build players. Yet, for most rural communities that is the only choice without driving an hour one way for a league.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BEST post I have read. The job for the rec program is to provide a sport for everyone to play not build players. Yet, for most rural communities that is the only choice without driving an hour one way for a league.

 

Thanks, coach. Thoroughly understand the driving thing. Been there, done that. Here's my question though, if a school system wants a good feeder program, then why aren't they involved more from let's say 3rd - 5th grade? For example, I know a very good and athletic, (basketball and baseball), 5th grade team, yet the school system could care less about their talent. They don't even know the teams exist for the most part.:confused:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, coach. Thoroughly understand the driving thing. Been there, done that. Here's my question though, if a school system wants a good feeder program, then why aren't they involved more from let's say 3rd - 5th grade? For example, I know a very good and athletic, (basketball and baseball), 5th grade team, yet the school system could care less about their talent. They don't even know the teams exist for the most part.:confused:

One problem is the level of talent. You stay in county and your top talented, athletic players at that level are not going to be pushed. They will not have to learn to use their left hand because no one can stop them from going right.

 

Public schools are now beginning to realize this and support these teams more.

 

At the same time, I see the argument from a standpoint of excluding players. If a player is not on a team in the 3rd-5th grade that is moving out of the county to play, will they eventually quit playing because they were not one of the "chosen" ones to leave the county and play.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BEST post I have read. The job for the rec program is to provide a sport for everyone to play not build players. Yet, for most rural communities that is the only choice without driving an hour one way for a league.

 

LBBC, I have preached this for nearly 3 years now. I've provided links to the Archdiocese of Louisville's CSAA organization. I've cited the sports and organization of grade school sports as well. It's all driven through the parishes and the private grade schools.

 

Why is it this fact is largely ignored? AAU is a factor, but not just for private school kids. The BIGGEST factor is that private school kids begin playing and exploring athletic interests as young as first grade in school. THEN they may eventually wind up on AAU teams. But far fewer in most sports than you realize.

 

When my son was in grade school, he played:

 

Basketball for an optimist league

Basketball for his grade school (grades 3-6)

Baseball for a Babe Ruth Team (t-Ball -10-11's)

Baseball for his school (T-ball in K, baseball 1-8th grade)

Baseball for a Little League team (12-13's)

Football for his school (grades 3-8)

 

 

NEVER played AAU

 

In that time, he participated in CSSA playoffs and championships in each Baseball, Basketball, and Football, twice playing in the largest division football Toy Bowl Championship game.

 

Tell me ANY other school system my son would have had these opportunities?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

LBBC, I have preached this for nearly 3 years now. I've provided links to the Archdiocese of Louisville's CSAA organization. I've cited the sports and organization of grade school sports as well. It's all driven through the parishes and the private grade schools.

 

Why is it this fact is largely ignored? AAU is a factor, but not just for private school kids. The BIGGEST factor is that private school kids begin playing and exploring athletic interests as young as first grade in school. THEN they may eventually wind up on AAU teams. But far fewer in most sports than you realize.

 

When my son was in grade school, he played:

 

Basketball for an optimist league

Basketball for his grade school (grades 3-6)

Baseball for a Babe Ruth Team (t-Ball -10-11's)

Baseball for his school (T-ballin K, baseball 1-8th grade)

Baseball for a Little League team (12-13's)

Football for his school (grades 3-8)

 

 

NEVER played AAU

 

In that time, he participated in CSSA playoffs and championships in each Baseball, Basketball, and Football, twice playing in the largest division football Toy Bowl Championship game.

 

Tell me ANY other school system my son would have had these opportunities?

I agree. Problem again for rural counties is that all of this is not feasible with any level of competition.

 

I have done it and am doing it now. Driving 30 minutes to an hour one way just for the chance for my child to play in a competitive league. But a lot of parents cannot afford or have the opportunity to do that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree. Problem again for rural counties is that all of this is not feasible with any level of competition.

 

I have done it and am doing it now. Driving 30 minutes to an hour one way just for the chance for my child to play in a competitive league. But a lot of parents cannot afford or have the opportunity to do that.

 

LBBC, I understand, but I must say....MANY parents of private school kids do it regularly. I don't know what else to say. It's a matter of choice, and there's always carpooling, etc. It's not like all private school kids parents are wealthy or have no other conflicts that could prohibit it. It's a decision made, and then, it just has to happen. I'm sorry...I don't mean to be insensitive, because I'm not...but there comes a point where some excuses can't rationalize it all away...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One problem is the level of talent. You stay in county and your top talented, athletic players at that level are not going to be pushed. They will not have to learn to use their left hand because no one can stop them from going right.

 

Public schools are now beginning to realize this and support these teams more.

 

At the same time, I see the argument from a standpoint of excluding players. If a player is not on a team in the 3rd-5th grade that is moving out of the county to play, will they eventually quit playing because they were not one of the "chosen" ones to leave the county and play.

 

Very Good Point. :thumb: After all, athletics is for everyone, regardless of talent. Everyone deserves a chance to play.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

LBBC, I understand, but I must say....MANY parents of private school kids do it regularly. I don't know what else to say. It's a matter of choice, and there's always carpooling, etc. It's not like all private school kids parents are wealthy or have no other conflicts that could prohibit it. It's a decision made, and then, it just has to happen. I'm sorry...I don't mean to be insensitive, because I'm not...but there comes a point where some excuses can't rationalize it all away...

I think we have discussed this to a point that we both understand each other well and agree with each other on several points. I agree with what you are saying. But for the urban and private schools, mostly in urban areas, these leagues/opportunities do not put a major hardship on the parents/players.

 

At the same point, EXCELLENT people to run the leagues and coach is very limited. Most time, you have to have the HS/MS coaches involved to adequately fill/run the league. During the season, that is an extremely difficult thing for the coaches at the HS/MS level to be involved in.

 

If you choose to participate in a league outside of the county, they may preclude you from participating in a league in another sport within the county. In urban areas you could go to softball practice at 4:00 and make your basketball game at 7:00. Not possible, if you are in a rural area.

 

Not to mention, having to do all of that means they are not at home spending time with their family and being the father/mother they should be. In rural counties, alot of times it becomes a choice between the two. It did for me and I got out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using the site you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use Policies.