Jump to content

Balance: Good vs. Bad


ChiefSmoke

Recommended Posts

I've read enough about the evils of football. I agree all efforts should be made to protect kids. It is personal for me because two concussions ended football for my son. When the doc said he was done, he was done. But, he is glad he played and that experience has had a tremendous impact on the man he is and is becoming. His little brother will play as well.

 

I did want to share this. For me, the positives far outweigh the negatives that go with HS football.

 

A coach I know received this text today:

 

Earlier today, I lost a childhood friend to drugs. He died at 31 years old. We always hung out growing up, but when I started playing football, I did not have time to hang out with him; and I also knew that the stuff he was into was stuff you would run me for. Fear of you at first, and later respect for the program, kept me from doing the same things. Thank you for being my anti drug.

 

I am not going to apologize for coaching HS football and encouraging every young man I know to play. We need to be more vocal about the positives that kids get from the experience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Although the game of football is a dangerous risk you take, it can also save your life. There are a few guys I still think about from high school to kids I have coached lately, wondering what they're doing right now because they hung up the pads and started running with the wrong crowd.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Football is not the leading cause of adolescent concussions...you are more likely to get a concussion jumping on a trampoline, riding a skateboard or bike, or...playing soccer! In fact, soccer is the leading sport for concussions in youth according to PBS. Heading the ball is now banned in youth soccer. Yet...I hear parents EVERY year at soccer games (my 6 year old and 8 year old both play as well as my 8 year old playing football) about how dangerous football is how they would never let their child play football...I usually laugh out loud by this point and then educate them about how the risk is much greater on this field than that one (pointing to the football field across the street). They're astonished when I tell them more than 10k ER visits this year will be soccer related. Now granted this also includes female athletes and football is almost exclusively male. Other major sports leading the concussion discussion are basketball. With that said the 2 leading causes of concussions overall are "falls" and motor vehicle accidents in children 5-18.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I grew up in upstate NY. The big sport on campus was not football, but ice hockey. I can tell you from having played and watched both sports for a long time, the collisions in hockey are much more violent that football. We are are also talking about a sport where fighting is a condoned component of the sport.

 

Concussion Rates in Football, Hockey and Lacrosse Rising | MomsTeam

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/02/sports/hockey/02concussions.html?_r=0

 

Here is some data on concussion rates. The only point relevant disagrees with me some what, but there does not seem to be as much data on hockey. In addition, you also carry out sticks and skates that can be used as weapons in a moment where self control is completely gone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Every sport, shot, every activity has an element of risk. As much as we try as coaches and parents, we can't put them in a bubble. Sports teach lots of skills: competitiveness, toughness, resilience, leadership, teamwork, creativity, obedience, and more. All skills that are essential to success in work and family. They are skills that seem to be in shorter supply in society today. Football is the consummate team game. No one person can do it alone. The best players and teams are those in service to each other. in today's all about me world, sports in general, and football in particular, are important tools. We do and should continue to mitigate risk. We are teaching tackling so much better today. Awareness of concussions is much stronger (who knows how many we had back in the day). We need to continue to educate, esp at the youngest levels, and we must advocate for our game.

We are not the NFL. Our kids are not adults. High school collisions are not the same, and neither is the high school brain. We need to remember that in all our endeavors with our kids.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've always said that playing high school football helped me as a person more than I helped the game. Lots of life lessons.

 

However, if we're going to have a valid discussion we need to stop focusing just on concussions. Sub-concussions are just as harmful when it comes to long-term brain injuries/brain damage. Repeated hits that do not warrant a concussion protocol are harmful.

 

Great, fair discussion to have. Let's just make sure we are discussing the true issue and not just one aspect of it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With that said I have predicted and continue to predict that we will see a fairly significant drop in football participation. My unscientific eyeball test seems to show that as I scan sidelines on Friday nights.

 

Parents are concerned. I talked to a young man just last night who played frosh football and did well. He is not sure if his parents will let him play this year due to fear of injuries. May focus on baseball. His dad, by the way, was a really good high school football player.

 

The concern is real and we'll see that reflected in numbers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With that said I have predicted and continue to predict that we will see a fairly significant drop in football participation. My unscientific eyeball test seems to show that as I scan sidelines on Friday nights.

 

Parents are concerned. I talked to a young man just last night who played frosh football and did well. He is not sure if his parents will let him play this year due to fear of injuries. May focus on baseball. His dad, by the way, was a really good high school football player.

 

The concern is real and we'll see that reflected in numbers.

 

 

That is why I shared that text and started this thread. There are many great stories about the benefits of football that we don't hear. In my opinion, the negatives are getting a lot more attention. I am fine with the truth. I would argue that the positive truths are getting left out and if we don't get those out there, the negatives will dominate the discussion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is why I shared that text and started this thread. There are many great stories about the benefits of football that we don't hear. In my opinion, the negatives are getting a lot more attention. I am fine with the truth. I would argue that the positive truths are getting left out and if we don't get those out there, the negatives will dominate the discussion.

 

Negatives and fears always get the eyeballs/ears.

 

Let me play devil's advocate here.

 

Your first post included a text about a player who you and football influenced. It shows the power of team sports. Problem for football is that a parent can say that baseball and basketball do the same. Less chance of long-term injury. Less chance of broken bones. Less chance of concussions.

 

I've always said that football provides a unique value. Problem is that moms don't know that since they didn't play and many dads don't know that for the same reason. They look at the high-profile cases and think "that could be my boy."

 

Football is up against it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Negatives and fears always get the eyeballs/ears.

 

Let me play devil's advocate here.

 

Your first post included a text about a player who you and football influenced. It shows the power of team sports. Problem for football is that a parent can say that baseball and basketball do the same. Less chance of long-term injury. Less chance of broken bones. Less chance of concussions.

 

I've always said that football provides a unique value. Problem is that moms don't know that since they didn't play and many dads don't know that for the same reason. They look at the high-profile cases and think "that could be my boy."

 

Football is up against it.

 

We have to figure out the best way to communicate/articulate football's uniqueness and why it is special.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using the site you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use Policies.