When do coaches run out of chances?

  1. #1
    isthatallyougot's Avatar
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    When do coaches run out of chances?

    O.K its been hinted to on several threads and with some of the records from usually good teams this year it appears as there is some struggling going on to win games. The gap between great teams and average teams is growing.
    My question is, when does a school, community, or school board make the decision to pull the plug on a coach and look elsewhere. It seems that mediocraty is acceptable in highschool football.
    The team I root for is coached by a school administrator and I doubt he will be replaced anytime soon. IMHO he needs to be due to his lack of any signs of improving the program over the ten years or so he has been coach. So what say you BGP'ers how and when is enough, enough, and how does a regular fan make his thoughts known?
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  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by isthatallyougot
    O.K its been hinted to on several threads and with some of the records from usually good teams this year it appears as there is some struggling going on to win games. The gap between great teams and average teams is growing.
    My question is, when does a school, community, or school board make the decision to pull the plug on a coach and look elsewhere. It seems that mediocrity is acceptable in high school football.
    The team I root for is coached by a school administrator and I doubt he will be replaced anytime soon. IMHO he needs to be due to his lack of any signs of improving the program over the ten years or so he has been coach. So what say you BGP'ers how and when is enough, enough, and how does a regular fan make his thoughts known?
    That is a tough question, since HS is predominately for educating students.

    Those student-athletes, which do play Football, play with a competitive intent and passion for the game. If the instruction, teaching and management of the program is in place, perhaps the reasons are elsewhere, other than the head coach.

    Players must assume accountability in the success of a program, as the coaching staff, school and community support.

    Very good question though.

  3. #3

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    You make a good point Strike3. Education is what is is about, although I also see (and wonder) about some of the programs that just plain struggle. Shawnee and Atherton in Louisville are prime examples. The have had good athletes, as evidenced by success in other sports, but football seems to flounder.

    The lack of success may breed lack of success. With marginal coaching and a general lack of motivation it is tough to get over the hump. A combination of a coach who is not only a good tactician but a good motivator, student-athletes that are self-motivated and willing to lead the others (encourage) on the team and lastly a good booster program willing to invest money and time into the players and the program.

    The coaches can only do so much, but a partnership between the coaches and the boosters can let the players know adults are interested in their future (on and off the field).

    If the coaches can't (or won't motivate) look to the players, if the players can't self motivate look to the boosters, if all three contribute their best, however marginal it is, the team will find success enough to build a program.

    As far as pulling the plug, that's may be too tough of a call for an school adminstrator who generally follow the adage " if it ain't broke....."

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