Do we really need NASA?

Page 3 of In my view, the biggest problem with NASA is that they have a monopoly, at least in the US. I think space exploration should be allowed to be privatize... 38 comments | 1606 Views | Go to page 1 →

  1. #31

    Join Date
    Nov 02
    Location
    Ft. Mitchell Ky
    Posts
    21,150

    Quote Originally Posted by 98NCCalum
    TYo the uninformed, NASA just launches a space shuttle every year.

    They do more for us than you'd ever imagine.
    I agree 100%! NASA does SO much. The technologies and other inventions NASA will come up with, trying to get a manned mission to Mars as an example, would be mind boggling to most right now. It goes on and on with the benefits NASA provides.
    Advertisement

  2. #32
    UKPat02's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 06
    Location
    Lexington
    Posts
    9,417

    Quote Originally Posted by SportsGuy41017
    I agree 100%! NASA does SO much. The technologies and other inventions NASA will come up with, trying to get a manned mission to Mars as an example, would be mind boggling to most right now. It goes on and on with the benefits NASA provides.
    But what's the point of sending a man to Mars? We have so many problems on this Earth as is, why not spend that money to the betterment of our society?

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Sep 02
    Location
    Time and Relaive Dimensions in Space
    Posts
    16,971

    Quote Originally Posted by UKPat02
    But what's the point of sending a man to Mars? We have so many problems on this Earth as is, why not spend that money to the betterment of our society?
    At the same time, what is the point of throwing money away into short term solutions when the sort of advances that NASA may well need to make for the trip to Mars would be a greater boon to society overall?


    Also, define "betterment of society" if you will.

  4. #34
    UKPat02's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 06
    Location
    Lexington
    Posts
    9,417

    Quote Originally Posted by PepRock01
    At the same time, what is the point of throwing money away into short term solutions when the sort of advances that NASA may well need to make for the trip to Mars would be a greater boon to society overall?


    Also, define "betterment of society" if you will.

    Say social programs. Education for instance. Why not divide 5 billion amongst all states ($100mil per state) to put into the public school system? This could be used to by new books, raise teacher salaries, provide healthier options in the lunch room and fund after school programs. But instead we seem fixated on putting a man on Mars - an event that will more than likely not glean us any more knowledge than what we have now.

  5. #35
    Ms Liberty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 06
    Location
    Go Reds!!!
    Posts
    3,903

    Agree to all the above.

  6. #36

    Join Date
    Dec 03
    Location
    Palm Desert, CA
    Posts
    23,817

    Quote Originally Posted by UKPat02
    But what's the point of sending a man to Mars? We have so many problems on this Earth as is, why not spend that money to the betterment of our society?
    Some would say that the Moon race was a total waste of money. They forget the technological advances that were made in medicine, aeronautics, engineering, computing and many other areas because of the space race.

  7. #37

    Join Date
    Sep 07
    Posts
    1,184

    HHSDad has an interesting point in privatizing the system. I had never thought of that before and that is an example of how much of a monopoly NASA has. Also, I believe that the vice president is always in charge of NASA. Im sure that foreign policy problems have been number one on Mr. Cheney's agenda during the Bush administration. Mabey a calmer time on the world-wide scene would provide more of an opportunity for a future VP to provide more leadership in space exploration.

  8. #38
    ram2003's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 03
    Location
    Fisherville/Louisville "When was the last time you saw a hippy that could take on an offensive tackle?"- Hank Hill
    Posts
    7,885

    Quote Originally Posted by UKPat02
    Say social programs. Education for instance. Why not divide 5 billion amongst all states ($100mil per state) to put into the public school system? This could be used to by new books, raise teacher salaries, provide healthier options in the lunch room and fund after school programs. But instead we seem fixated on putting a man on Mars - an event that will more than likely not glean us any more knowledge than what we have now.
    I disagree... I mean, you could be right, but human exploration has pretty much always brought about something new.

    But while I disagree, I do see where you're coming from. It all just boils down to trying to cover all the bases. We're Americans, and we want to be the best at everything. If we weren't going to spend the money, another nation would, and THEY'D be pioneers of the future, and do we really want that?

  9. #39

    Join Date
    Oct 05
    Posts
    2,909

    Quote Originally Posted by kygirl
    Agree, we need NASA.
    Here are some of the contributions that have been made by NASA...the scope, clarity, and reliability of our long distance telephone system is the result of communications-satellite technology developed by NASA over a 30 year period. The monitoring systems used in intensive care units and heart rehabilitation wards were developed from the systems used to monitor astronauts during the first space missions in the early 1960s. A single nurse can now monitor several patients in critical care situations. Countless Americans recovering from heart attacks and other serious illnesses or injuries owe their lives to this technology, a direct result of NASA’s space program. NASA’s research in developing and demonstrating space-based beacon locators was used to create an international, satellite-based search and rescue system that has helped save almost 13,000 lives worldwide (as of January 2002). The system automatically detects and locates transmissions from emergency beacons carried by ships, aircraft or individuals.The system then alerts appropriate rescue authorities. A total of 30 nations participate in the system, which operates 24 hours a day year-round.
    NASA researchers determined that cutting thin grooves across concrete runways reduces the risk of hydroplaning. The grooves, which create channels for excess water to drain, have been shown to improve aircraft tire friction performance in wet conditions by 200 to 300 percent. As a result, hundreds of commercial airports around the world have had their runways grooved. This technique is now used nationwide on highway curves and overpasses; pedestrian walkways, ramps and steps; and food processing plants and cattle holding pens. The use of grooves on highways has contributed to an 85 percent reduction in highway accidents.This could be NASA’s most successful technology in terms of lives saved and injuries and accidents avoided.
    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are extremely small devices and sensors (comparable to the size of a human hair). MEMS applications are directly traceable to the miniature accelerometers NASA developed in the 1970s to measure changes in speed of small objects or activity levels of people or animals during human space flight. MEMS technology is used now in consumer products to trigger automobile airbags, regulate pacemakers and even keep washers and dryers balanced. MEMS-based products have grown into a $3 billion per year industry. The original NASA-sponsored work on an MEMS accelerometer is referenced in 83 patents; the earliest reference was made in 1975 and the latest in 2003.

    The list goes on...bottom line NASA makes a difference in a lot of lives.
    Wow. Nice job KYGIRL. Are you a lobbyist? If not, you should consider it. I agree with you 100%

Top