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NFL to Require All Personnel on Field to Stand for Anthem


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Freedom of Speech only applies to the government preventing the speech. An employer on the other hand has every right to discipline someone for saying or doing something that they deem inappropriate. The NFL is an employer, nothing more and NFL players are employees. Just like any other employee they are subject to rules imposed by their employer.

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I won't be conversing on this topic. It bores the hell out of me.

 

You just did.

 

For the most part you are correct but anytime there was "an incident" it was covered during the games so you are stuck. Trust me, I quit watching all the NFL preview shows and reading most of the NFL gossip online like I used to, to escape this stuff. And for me is started with the NFL singling out the Patriots and deflategate, that stretched over two seasons, this looks to the be the same way.

 

Coming full circle, it isn't this specific controversy, it is that it is another major controversy with the NFL, that is what turns me off.

 

If you can’t do a silent protest at your job without fearing dismissal then you don’t have much value to your employer.

 

TheGuru's reaction is why the owners came out with the "policy." This effects advertising dollars. The owners felt it necessary to address an action by the players that was causing their customers to watch less NFL. The controversy is threatening the product. @ColonelPops, any owner that allows an employee to negatively effect his bottom line isn't much of a businessperson. Said another way: if an employee's protest effects the profitability of a business, that employee doesn't value the employer or even his/her own job.

 

It is the reaction of many NFL fans to Kaepernick's protest that is the driving force behind the owner's decision. They fear losing market share. They've come up with a policy that they hope will satisfy the fans. The players will stand for the anthem. The players who want to protest can do so by remaining in the locker room.

 

The fans' protest last season is the driving force behind this whole thing. The owners know they need the fans. For many fans, disrespecting the flag (you may not agree with their characterization) is an issue that will cause them to watch less NFL or turn it off completely. The owners are responding to this.

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Freedom of Speech only applies to the government preventing the speech. An employer on the other hand has every right to discipline someone for saying or doing something that they deem inappropriate. The NFL is an employer, nothing more and NFL players are employees. Just like any other employee they are subject to rules imposed by their employer.

 

Now that wasn’t hard... where were you 8 pages ago!?

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If the NFL cared about our military maybe they all would protest the fact that 20 veterans commit suicide a day.

 

Players silently take a knee and we lose our minds.

 

This country is upside-down.

 

Put them back in the locker room like they were before the NFL used players as patriotic pawns after 9/11.

 

Through its long-standing partnerships and support from our 32 teams, the NFL takes pride in supporting military personnel and remains committed to raising awareness for the sacrifices they make on our behalf. Year-round, the league works with its military non-profit partners including the Pat Tillman Foundation, USO, TAPS and Wounded Warrior Project and the Bob Woodruff Foundation, to fund programs and provide resources that positively impact veterans and active duty military members and their families. Since 2011, the NFL has raised more than $26 million for its military non-profit partners.

 

They do care a little bit...

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What does Kim Davis do?

 

I would add to that list "Community Organizer" but the list is relatively short. And to be technical about it, Kim Davis wasn't a protester. She simply refused to do a task at her job that she found to be morally objectionable for which she could have been fired. She was willing to take that risk.

 

A protest is a symbolic action meant to draw attention to another issue other than the action. Her action would be a protest if, let's say, she chose to refuse to sign all marriage certificates in support of a clerk in another county who was fired or being censured for refusing to sign marriage licenses for same-sex couples.

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I would add to that list "Community Organizer" but the list is relatively short. And to be technical about it, Kim Davis wasn't a protester. She simply refused to do a task at her job that she found to be morally objectionable for which she could have been fired. She was willing to take that risk.

 

A protest is a symbolic action meant to draw attention to another issue other than the action. Her action would be a protest if, let's say, she chose to refuse to sign all marriage certificates in support of a clerk in another county who was fired or being censured for refusing to sign marriage licenses for same-sex couples.

 

What Kim Davis did was absolutely a protest, but people try to justify it because they agree with her opinion.

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True but they technically did it off work, right?

 

Technically they did it off work because they refused to go to work which caused every school district in the state to shut down. Teachers are salaried so technically they also still were paid that day and the protest was during normal school hours so I can see how that would be a form of protest during working hours. Weren’t there people saying that they should be fired for refusing to go teach that day?

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You just did.

 

 

 

 

 

TheGuru's reaction is why the owners came out with the "policy." This effects advertising dollars. The owners felt it necessary to address an action by the players that was causing their customers to watch less NFL. The controversy is threatening the product. @ColonelPops, any owner that allows an employee to negatively effect his bottom line isn't much of a businessperson. Said another way: if an employee's protest effects the profitability of a business, that employee doesn't value the employer or even his/her own job.

 

It is the reaction of many NFL fans to Kaepernick's protest that is the driving force behind the owner's decision. They fear losing market share. They've come up with a policy that they hope will satisfy the fans. The players will stand for the anthem. The players who want to protest can do so by remaining in the locker room.

 

The fans' protest last season is the driving force behind this whole thing. The owners know they need the fans. For many fans, disrespecting the flag (you may not agree with their characterization) is an issue that will cause them to watch less NFL or turn it off completely. The owners are responding to this.

 

I can’t help but wonder if the reasoning behind a similar protest was something that people favored how the protest would be accepted. Say guns had been banned in 2010 and Joe Thomas decided to take a knee during the anthem in protest. I can’t help but wonder if the bring-back-guns crowd would take a knee with him or would they be equally disgusted with his form of protest.

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Freedom of Speech only applies to the government preventing the speech. An employer on the other hand has every right to discipline someone for saying or doing something that they deem inappropriate. The NFL is an employer, nothing more and NFL players are employees. Just like any other employee they are subject to rules imposed by their employer.

 

No one is saying they can’t do it.

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