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Boston bomber sentenced to death

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I think the word around the internet is it's far more expensive to execute someone then it is to house them for life, because of the cost of appeals.

 

That's correct. The primary reason is because of the cost of appeals, which usually take years...and thereby require paying judges, prosecutors, assistant prosecutors, and police/detectives for years worth of work...plus the added cost of segregated confinement on death row.

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Tim McVeigh spent 4 years on death row. Let's hope this guy has a similar length of time.

 

He did seem to get the express pass...I think from the time of the crime to conviction to death was maybe 6 years total.

 

McVeigh voluntarily ended his appeal process. That's why his execution took place so quickly.

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McVeigh voluntarily ended his appeal process. That's why his execution took place so quickly.

 

Your right, I forgot that.

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We spend money on all sorts of retarded things, spend it on his execution. Good decision. My only contention is that I'd prefer for him to die with a pressure cooker of explosives strapped to his ankles and not knowing when it will go off.

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We spend money on all sorts of retarded things, spend it on his execution. Good decision. My only contention is that I'd prefer for him to die with a pressure cooker of explosives strapped to his ankles and not knowing when it will go off.

 

I said these exact words to a friend yesterday. Put him in a room with a pressure cooker filled with steel ball bearings and make him wait until it explodes.

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That's correct. The primary reason is because of the cost of appeals, which usually take years...and thereby require paying judges, prosecutors, assistant prosecutors, and police/detectives for years worth of work...plus the added cost of segregated confinement on death row.

 

Wouldn't he most likely be in segregated confinement if sentence was life? Also do those sentence to life not get the option of appeals?

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Wouldn't he most likely be in segregated confinement if sentence was life? Also do those sentence to life not get the option of appeals?

 

Lifers - including those given life sentences via murder conviction - generally are not given segregated confinement unless there is an additional extenuating circumstance. I'm not sure whether Tsarnaev's high profile, the size or manner of his crime, or the fact that he was federally convicted rather than convicted by a state would possibly play a role in potentially getting him a segregated stay in prison were he to have been given a life sentence rather than the death penalty. I do know that Ted Kaczynski (the Unabomber), Terry Nichols (Timothy McVeigh's accomplice in the Oklahoma City bombing), and Eric Rudolph (the Atlanta Centennial Park bomber) are all serving life sentences in solitary confinement in a supermax prison in Colorado. That would lead me to believe Tsarnaev would have been given a similar stay had he been given a life sentence.

 

As for appeals on life sentences, those appeals are much more frequently denied than the appeals from death sentences. With death sentences, not only are those convicts granted an automatic appeal following their initial sentence, but any and all of the their subsequent appeals are are also required to be given "special consideration" by the judge due to the gravity of the sentence - and most judges don't want to be the one person who wasn't willing to give a convict's case another look, with the exception of some states' Supreme Courts, and the Supreme Court of the United States.

 

Interesting fact: In most states that permit death sentences, the number of convicts who actually are executed hovers between 25% and 45%. The remainder die of natural causes while in prison. If you remove Texas from that figure (Texas has one of the swiftest rates of execution, and the highest number of executions), then the number of convicts who actually are executed drops to the 15%-30% range. Texas accounts for one-quarter to one-half of the executions performed in the US on a year to year basis.

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Court overturns Boston Marathon bomber’s death sentence

The article states that the death sentence was overturned, but reading the article I think the more appropriate wording would be "thrown out". I believe Dzhokhar Tsarnaev can still be re-sentenced, as indicated when one of the three judges on the panel from the 1st US Circuit Court of Appeals that heard the case stated, "...make no mistake: Dzhokhar will spend his remaining days locked up in prison, with the only matter remaining being whether he will die by execution."

The crux of Tsarnaev's appeal argument was that the case was not moved out of Boston to a less-biased legal venue, and that two of the jurors were not dismissed after clearly showing bias against Tsarnaev via social media posts before the trial.

Tsarnaev has been in custody since his arrest on April 19, 2013, and following his sentencing in June 2015 he was transferred to ADX Florence, a supermax penitentiary in Florence, Colorado. Other notable ADX Florence inmates include El Chapo, James "Little Jimmy" Marcello, Robert Hanssen, Eric Rudolph (the Centennial Olympic Park bomber), Ted Kaczynski (The Unabomber), Ramzi Yousef (the 1993 World Trade Center bomber), and numerous other foreign and domestic terrorists.

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