Emerald Ash Borer

Page 2 of The Emerald Ash Borer has officially invaded the lawildcat compound in southern Campbell County. We have 21 trees in our yard and 15 of those are ash t... 25 comments | 866 Views | Go to page 1 →

  1. #16
    CincySportsFan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by plantmanky View Post
    If your branches have sapped excessively and have a white powdery substance in the sap then its very possible. There is not much you can do to help the pines.
    I really haven't noticed any of the sap-related symptoms...but, as I said, just about all the needles have gone brown on their outer 1/3 to 1/2. I wonder, can I pull off some needles and take them to my extension agent for it to be identified? Or is it something that needs to be looked at in the whole?
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  2. #17
    plantmanky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CincySportsFan View Post
    I really haven't noticed any of the sap-related symptoms...but, as I said, just about all the needles have gone brown on their outer 1/3 to 1/2. I wonder, can I pull off some needles and take them to my extension agent for it to be identified? Or is it something that needs to be looked at in the whole?
    You can take a branch cutting and have it check. They may want to come out and look at it after that.

  3. #18
    CincySportsFan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by plantmanky View Post
    You can take a branch cutting and have it check. They may want to come out and look at it after that.
    Thanks!

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcpapa View Post
    Must not be a lot of professional ballplayers in the Department of Agriculture.
    I read a story about bat making and maple is becoming a preferred wood now in MLB, however, the maple bats are also being blamed for the high number of bats shearing and flying around the infield.

  5. #20
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    In the end, we had 23 trees cut down from our yard with the final ones coming down earlier this week. This morning, our stump guy was there ready to grind them all down. Damn you emerald ash borer!!!!

  6. #21
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    I took down one that was a threat to hit my garage. The rest are just falling randomly. Been dragging them to the fire pit and plan to cut a few more up for fire wood when it cools down. At least I won't have to let them season before I burn.

  7. #22

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    I lost two really nice ash trees to the Emerald Ash Borer. Cut them down last July. Noticed the first signs of trouble in 2014 and by 2016 they were completely dead.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by lawildcat View Post
    In the end, we had 23 trees cut down from our yard with the final ones coming down earlier this week. This morning, our stump guy was there ready to grind them all down. Damn you emerald ash borer!!!!
    Your before and after picks have a wow factor to them.

  9. #24
    Colonels_Wear_Blue's Avatar
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    I just cut one down in my backyard a couple of weekends ago. The ash tree is unfortunately going to go the way of the American Chestnut...which was wiped out by the North American chestnut blight in the first half of the 20th century. Prior to that, folks used to say that if you ever wanted to survive in the woods in the eastern US, you knew you could always make it because all you needed to do was pick up chestnuts and eat them. Chestnut tree numbers in North America are estimated to have been somewhere between 3 and 4 BILLION...with the higher end of that range generally being the accepted number. Now days the US Forest Service can generally tell you how many chestnut trees each state has, with numbers less than 100 most states. Absolutely crazy to think about.

    Fortunately scientists have been able to take seeds from the handfuls of surviving American chestnuts, which genetically managed to have been blight resistant for whatever reason, and they've hybridized those trees with other species of chestnut trees in order to come up with something as genetically close as possible to the original American chestnut, while still displaying the blight resistance of the other species. The American Chestnut Foundation is hoping to have their finalized chestnut seeds ready to start reintroducing chestnut trees into North American forests by 2020.

  10. #25
    True blue (and gold)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colonels_Wear_Blue View Post
    Some "faster" growing deciduous shade trees that might be of interest to you:

    Freeman/Autumn Blaze Maple
    Tulip Tree/Tulip Poplar (Also the Kentucky State Tree)
    Sycamore
    Hybrid Poplar
    Japanese/Green Vase Zelkova
    I have an Autumn Blaze Maple that I planted ten years ago. Great tree providing some good shade now. Beautiful in the fall, too.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by True blue (and gold) View Post
    I have an Autumn Blaze Maple that I planted ten years ago. Great tree providing some good shade now. Beautiful in the fall, too.
    I planted 6 of them evenly spaced across the front about 7 years ago. I love them in the fall.

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