Deer Genetics Question

  1. #1
    Watusi's Avatar
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    Deer Genetics Question

    Two years ago while hunting on a farm we use I saw a pretty decent buck with only one antler. It was late muzzleloader season and I thought he may have lost the other one in a fight. I only saw him from his "good" side, and couldn't see the other pedicel. I let him walk.

    Flash forward to this year. My son and I were hunting and he had already taken a buck. It was our last afternoon and I saw another deer with only one antler. It was a small 2 point antler and I immediately thought about the other deer I had seen two years ago. This time, the deer stopped and faced us at about 75 yards and I could see something amiss on the other side of his head. I looked through my scope and he had what I call an inverted antler. It grew downward beside his head, and wasn't fully formed, there was a thick boot like growth on the end, which I thought was probably dried velvet. I've seen pictures before of similar deer, but never one in the field.

    I decided to take this guy out of the gene pool and put meet in the freezer.

    I know antler growth can be affected by many things, including injuries or sickness. My question is, could it be a genetic problem? Was I right to harvest this deer or is it just insignificant?
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    Jumper_Dad's Avatar
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    Could be genetic. We'll know in a season or two after you eat it, if you start dropping on one side or get any strange growths.

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    spindoc's Avatar
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    There's a cool study of rack formations on a deer farm if you're so inclined to google it. Dispels the spike myth.

    I'd whack that dude next yr if you see him to keep him from thrusting those genes into the next generation

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    Yep. Some genes just shouldn't go any further.

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    Quote Originally Posted by spindoc View Post
    There's a cool study of rack formations on a deer farm if you're so inclined to google it. Dispels the spike myth.

    I'd whack that dude next yr if you see him to keep him from thrusting those genes into the next generation
    I will look it up, that is interesting to me. And I did whack him for that very reason. I just can't decide if that kind of thing is genetic or not?

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    Good decision my man for getting him out of the gene pool and I am sure he is gonna eat just fine ... Good shootin' ... Anybody else see anything crazy in the woods this fall ...

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawildcat View Post
    Yep. Some genes just shouldn't go any further.
    Amen....oh wait we're talking about deer.

  9. #9
    mountain ref's Avatar
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    My son killed a poor genetic antlered deer this year for that very reason. To get it out of the gene pool.
    The tenderloin taste as good as a good buck though.

  10. #10
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    I would say there is a really good chance it was genetic. Deer are no different than any other critter in the sense that parent's genetics have an effect on offspring. That said it would still be possible that this fella had no relation to the other deer you saw a few years ago. Probably a good decision to take him if you are trying to improve the rack sizes in your area.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by spindoc View Post
    There's a cool study of rack formations on a deer farm if you're so inclined to google it. Dispels the spike myth.

    I'd whack that dude next yr if you see him to keep him from thrusting those genes into the next generation
    Here's a good one. This guy photographed this deer from the time it was a 1 1/2 year old spike until the day it died at 12 1/2. Hit in the 170's at 6 years old. Photo Gallery: From Buttons to Booner | Deer Hunting | Realtree

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    Well we had a 1/2 rack buck come by us on 2 separate occasions and we passed on him, the last time I could see something on the other side growing all weird, if we see him in muzzleload he is history.

  13. #13
    BirdBrain's Avatar
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    Chances are genetic and good to remove him from the herd if you are practicing QDM. First buck I ever killed was a "15 point" malformed rack. You could fit the entire nub of each side in your fist, like it had melted.

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