Millennials Leaving the Church

Page 3 of I was watching the 700 Club last night and they were talking about this topic. The numbers are definitive- millennials are leaving the church in droves... 72 comments | 2710 Views | Go to page 1 →

  1. #31
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    It makes sense that the churches that do not have such a strict doctrine would appeal to more people.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PP1 View Post
    It makes sense that the churches that do not have such a strict doctrine would appeal to more people.
    Not necessarily. In the past 40-50 years, the church's who have had the most loss in membership are the mainline Protestant faiths (Presbyterians, Methodists, Lutherans and especially Episcopalians) and until recently, those gaining the most members where the more orthodox Protestant faiths (Southern Baptist and Evangelical Churches such as Louisville's Southeast Christian). In the Catholic Faith, it is your churches lead by a more traditionalist John Paul II type priest who are growing (in Louisville, St. Elizabeth's, Guardian Angels, etc.) and parishes lead by the more feel good priests are losing membership.

  3. #33
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    @Bert I think you're right. Now that I think about it a little more, my experience has shown me that unchurched people that have never really thought about Christ like those bigger, more fun, open minded churches but once they start taking their faith more seriously they want more in-depth study and stronger arguments.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PP1 View Post
    @Bert I think you're right. Now that I think about it a little more, my experience has shown me that unchurched people that have never really thought about Christ like those bigger, more fun, open minded churches but once they start taking their faith more seriously they want more in
    I agree. If you look at Southeast Christian's prime membership growth, it was back when Southern Bapist Churches and the Archdiocese of Louisville were both lead by (in many people's opinion) very wishy-washy, don't offend anyone with the truth type of leaders. When the Southern Baptist Convention had it's revolution and later when Archbishop Kelly retired and Archbishop Kurtz assumed the leadership role of the Archdiocese, the growth of Southeast Christian slowed dramatically. The damage was already done to the Archdiocese of Louisville, several Catholic Churches were closed and many others don't have near the number of parishoners they used to. The joke is that Southeast Christian is Louisville's largest Catholic Church due to the thousands of baptized Catholics who now go there instead.

  5. #35
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    I feel like the many of the younger crowd (and some of the older crowd as well) wants to be either entertained or catered to. Church isn't about being entertained or catered to in everything. I agree with what TAC, its not what you get out of church, it's what you put into it. It's not about you, its about God.

  6. #36
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    "Couples that pray together, stay together."
    and "The greatest thing that a father can do for his children is to love their mother."
    and "The greatest thing that a mother can do for her children is to love their father."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bert View Post
    Not necessarily. In the past 40-50 years, the church's who have had the most loss in membership are the mainline Protestant faiths (Presbyterians, Methodists, Lutherans and especially Episcopalians) and until recently, those gaining the most members where the more orthodox Protestant faiths (Southern Baptist and Evangelical Churches such as Louisville's Southeast Christian). In the Catholic Faith, it is your churches lead by a more traditionalist John Paul II type priest who are growing (in Louisville, St. Elizabeth's, Guardian Angels, etc.) and parishes lead by the more feel good priests are losing membership.
    As a Catholic in NKY I don't see what you're seeing. All Catholic churches are losing members. When I say "losing" I mean those who just aren't showing up for Mass even though they may consider themselves to be part of the parish. I bet Crossroads in Cincinnati/NKY has picked up a large number of Catholics.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Run To State View Post
    I feel like the many of the younger crowd (and some of the older crowd as well) wants to be either entertained or catered to. Church isn't about being entertained or catered to in everything. I agree with what TAC, its not what you get out of church, it's what you put into it. It's not about you, its about God.
    You can probably differentiate "Mass" and the "parish/Catholic community."

    A Catholic mass with a boring priest is simply going to be unappealing to some/many. A dynamic priest is a game-changer. A YOUNG dynamic priest IMO is really important in a parish especially when it comes to the younger members.

    We've all had the boring priest where your mind wanders during the homily. If you're not a life-long and/or committed Catholic you're not excited on Sunday morning to go to Mass.

    I'm blessed to currently have a priest that has a lot of energy, youth, and is a great communicator. I'll fully admit there are times when I see certain priests on the schedule and I think "maybe I'll go to a different parish" today. It matters.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde View Post
    You can probably differentiate "Mass" and the "parish/Catholic community."

    A Catholic mass with a boring priest is simply going to be unappealing to some/many. A dynamic priest is a game-changer. A YOUNG dynamic priest IMO is really important in a parish especially when it comes to the younger members.

    We've all had the boring priest where your mind wanders during the homily. If you're not a life-long and/or committed Catholic you're not excited on Sunday morning to go to Mass.

    I'm blessed to currently have a priest that has a lot of energy, youth, and is a great communicator. I'll fully admit there are times when I see certain priests on the schedule and I think "maybe I'll go to a different parish" today. It matters.
    It shouldn't matter. I've been Catholic all my life. We've had boring and dynamic priests off and on all through those years. I never went to a different parish because of a boring priest. The reason is I know I'm not there to be entertained. I'm there to worship God, to give something back. I don't need to feel like I just came from a Broadway show, I just need to strengthen my relationship with God. Humble doesn't push me away.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Run To State View Post
    It shouldn't matter. I've been Catholic all my life. We've had boring and dynamic priests off and on all through those years. I never went to a different parish because of a boring priest. The reason is I know I'm not there to be entertained. I'm there to worship God, to give something back. I don't need to feel like I just came from a Broadway show, I just need to strengthen my relationship with God. Humble doesn't push me away.
    I'm with you here. Sure--I will visit other churches at times and think, "Wow--what a cool, dynamic, young priest." But I still go to my regular parish most of the time. There is something to be said about the routine, "boring", no frills Mass. I'm there to:
    1. Worship
    2. Listen and renew/recharge
    You could say "lather-rinse-repeat". But if you are a regular Mass/church goer, it becomes "addicting" in that you WANT to go back next week.

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    I teach at a Catholic school. On Fridays I tell my students that their weekend "homework" is to attend Mass with their family. At the end of the school year, a student told me that he can't wait until he is 16 and has his license so that he can go to Mass.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Run To State View Post
    It shouldn't matter. I've been Catholic all my life. We've had boring and dynamic priests off and on all through those years. I never went to a different parish because of a boring priest. The reason is I know I'm not there to be entertained. I'm there to worship God, to give something back. I don't need to feel like I just came from a Broadway show, I just need to strengthen my relationship with God. Humble doesn't push me away.
    To say it shouldn't matter IMO is to ignore the fact we're human. If it's just the words said then I might agree. It's not. It's how they are presented. It's how passionate the priest is. It's how clear he is in his message. The priest matters in the homily. You say "entertained." I never said that. I want a great communicator to put some fire in me and so I can GET the message. I've sat through a lot of homilies where that didn't happen and it's a shame.

    Plus we're talking about what might be keeping younger parishoners away. I can almost guarantee a survey would show that those at Mass with poor communicators are more likely to stay away than vice versa.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoops5 View Post
    2. Listen and renew/recharge
    .
    The priest has a role in this. That's my point.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde View Post
    To say it shouldn't matter IMO is to ignore the fact we're human. If it's just the words said then I might agree. It's not. It's how they are presented. It's how passionate the priest is. It's how clear he is in his message. The priest matters in the homily. You say "entertained." I never said that. I want a great communicator to put some fire in me and so I can GET the message. I've sat through a lot of homilies where that didn't happen and it's a shame.

    Plus we're talking about what might be keeping younger parishoners away. I can almost guarantee a survey would show that those at Mass with poor communicators are more likely to stay away than vice versa.
    You first quoted me, not the other way around. I said entertained from the beginning. I also said catered to. What you're describing sounds a lot like being catered to. "Your not keeping my attention because I need stimulation, so I'm taking my ball and going home". Anyone can get the message if they just quit putting themselves first and listen. To me, it's like saying I flunked the class because the teacher was boring. No, you flunked because you brought nothing to the table. You're there to honor God, to worship Him. It's not about being stimulated so you can "get it". You should be able to listen and "get it" regardless what priest is the Celebrant.
    We had a priest that was from India, a really nice guy. But there was a bit of a language barrier for some because his accent was thick. People would complain they couldn't understand because of his accent. I found, the more he was the Celebrant of the Mass I attended, the more I was able to understand him. The reason was because I made it a point to listen. It was that simple.
    Don't take this personal Clyde, because I don't mean for it to be, but if you need someone to put some fire into you to get the message you've approached it with the wrong intentions or the wrong mindset from the beginning IMO. Just listen. The message is still the same.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Run To State View Post
    You first quoted me, not the other way around. I said entertained from the beginning. I also said catered to. What you're describing sounds a lot like being catered to. "Your not keeping my attention because I need stimulation, so I'm taking my ball and going home". Anyone can get the message if they just quit putting themselves first and listen. To me, it's like saying I flunked the class because the teacher was boring. No, you flunked because you brought nothing to the table. You're there to honor God, to worship Him. It's not about being stimulated so you can "get it". You should be able to listen and "get it" regardless what priest is the Celebrant.
    We had a priest that was from India, a really nice guy. But there was a bit of a language barrier for some because his accent was thick. People would complain they couldn't understand because of his accent. I found, the more he was the Celebrant of the Mass I attended, the more I was able to understand him. The reason was because I made it a point to listen. It was that simple.
    Don't take this personal Clyde, because I don't mean for it to be, but if you need someone to put some fire into you to get the message you've approached it with the wrong intentions or the wrong mindset from the beginning IMO. Just listen. The message is still the same.
    We will disagree to a degree. The way the message is delivered always matters - at Mass or in life. I don't even see how that's debatable. The "fire" or "passion" keeps people engaged. Again, I'm not sure how that's debatable. Take two people talking - one is droning on in a monotone voice and the other is enthusiastic and engaging. What person has a better chance of getting the message across?

    Boring priests , as good as they are as human beings and as devoted as they are to the Church, without question have a negative impact on the Mass especially to those who are wavering or just getting into the faith.

    You're looking at it through the lens of someone who is already passionate and fully devoted to the Church no matter what - you! I'm saying take a step back and let's talk about what MAY be hurting the cause of retaining and/or acquiring younger parishoners. You're already where we want people to be. Saying "do what I do" isn't always enough.

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