Most Memorable Homeruns- What Tops Your List???

Page 2 of There's been a plethora of big homers in baseball history. What homerun stands out most in your mind? I'll start with a few and you can take it from th... 36 comments | 978 Views | Go to page 1 →

  1. #16

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    Worst was Fred Lynn hitting a Grand Slam off Atlee Hammaker in the 1983 All Star game. It was the end of the National League dominance in the All-Star game.
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  2. #17

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    Bill Mazeroski's walk-off to beat the big, bad Yankees in Game 7 in 1960.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sumoroyal View Post
    Hal King hit a big home run in a double header in like 1974 that started a major Reds comeback.
    I remember that homer well. I went crazy. Reds went on to sweep that doubleheader and overcame an 11 or 12 game Dodger lead to win the division. But it was 1973. The Reds went on to lose to the Mets in the playoffs(the series that featured the Pete and Bud Harrelson fight).

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Runcible Owl View Post
    1972 NLCS: Reds v. Pirates, game 5. Bottom of the ninth, Reds down 2-1. Johnny Bench HR to tie the game. Reds go to World Series on a later wild pitch.

    Boy begins listening to the game on the radio with grade school class. School bus ride midgame; torture. Home, listening to Al Michaels, and boy practices serious intercessory prayer. Bench homers. Two outs later, Foster scores on a wild pitch. Reds win. Boy convinced of divine intervention.
    Wow, same here. My papaw poured beer over my head in celebration after Foster scored the winning run. Michaels call on that wild pitch is my all-time favorite sports call. Do you remember who was at the plate when the wild pitch was made? I can still remember him jumping up and down as Foster came home. Also, do you remember who threw up the dinger to Bench and who threw the fateful wild pitch?

  5. #20
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    Hal McRae at the plate on Bob Moose's wild pitch. Dave Giusti gave up the homer to Bench. Foster was pinch running for Tony Perez. Full disclosure: Had to look this up.

    Roberto Clemente's last game.
    Last edited by Runcible Owl; May 6, 17 at 02:32 PM.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Runcible Owl View Post
    Hal McRae at the plate on Bob Moose's wild pitch. Dave Giusti gave up the homer to Bench. Foster was pinch running for Tony Perez. Full disclosure: Had to look this up.

    Roberto Clemente's last game.
    This is one of those games that is ingrained in my memory, hopefully forever. Also, it was my first taste of beer.

  7. #22
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    Thinking of the Bench homer and the subsequent wild pitch that gave the Reds the '72 pennant got me to thinking about Dave Giusti. I know LRCW will know this one but what was Giusti's signature pitch?

  8. #23
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    Ted Williams. Number 521 in his last at bat.

    John Updike's article about it in The New Yorker is one of the best baseball stories ever written.

    Hub Fans Bid Kid Adieu - The New Yorker
    Last edited by Runcible Owl; May 6, 17 at 11:12 PM.

  9. #24
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    The Bonds homer was the best.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by sumoroyal View Post
    Hal King hit a big home run in a double header in like 1974 that started a major Reds comeback.
    Yes, I remember that one well, against the Dodgers. 7/1/73 though.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by sumoroyal View Post
    Tony Perez off the blooper pitch from Bill Lee in the 1976 World Series.
    I'm pretty sure that was 75 against Redsox, 76 series was against Yankees. But I'm sure you knew that sumoroyal, you just had a typo.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Science Friction View Post
    Thinking of the Bench homer and the subsequent wild pitch that gave the Reds the '72 pennant got me to thinking about Dave Giusti. I know LRCW will know this one but what was Giusti's signature pitch?
    That would be the old "palm ball". By the way, I used to be able to throw a screw ball, and been known to drink few as well.

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    Just a regular season game but Adam Dunn's grand slam against Cleveland in 9th at GABP was maybe my favorite Marty call ever. I think it capped an 8 or 9 run comeback in last two innings.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by OlDog75 View Post
    That would be the old "palm ball". By the way, I used to be able to throw a screw ball, and been known to drink few as well.
    Palm ball is correct. It was essentially a change-up , of sorts. Giusti was the pitcher most associated with the pitch.

    Speaking of the screwball, I threw that on occasion as well. Oldog75, do you remember what Reds' lefty from the '70's specialized in the screwball. He came over to us in a trade with the Padres.

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