Baseballs In the Dirt

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    Baseballs In the Dirt

    Why do MLB umpires discard baseballs that hit the dirt when pitched but leave in play batted balls that may have bounced three times in the infield dirt?
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    MJAlltheWay24's Avatar
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    I feel like they usually check them because if dirt is left on them it could give the pitcher an advantage by being able to put additional spin on them.

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    sumoroyal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MJAlltheWay24 View Post
    I feel like they usually check them because if dirt is left on them it could give the pitcher an advantage by being able to put additional spin on them.
    True, but if a batter hits a high chopper off the dirt in front of the plate for an out, it stays in play. I think throwing them out is stupid.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MJAlltheWay24 View Post
    I feel like they usually check them because if dirt is left on them it could give the pitcher an advantage by being able to put additional spin on them.
    Yes, but wouldn't the same advantage exist on a batted ball? Why differentiate is my point.

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    The ball gets scuffed which can affect movement. Most balls put in play on the ground are also checked and regularly discarded.

    Often times the pitcher will get the ball back and throw it out himself. Pitchers like movement but only if it's predictable movement.

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    A lot of batted balls are also taken out of play. Unless you're at the game OR get an unusual camera angle, you don't see it. You see all the pitched balls that bounce and are taken out of play because that is where the camera is focused.

    Also, authentication is a huge thing now. If you ever notice, just about every ball taken out of play, broken bats and other things I am guessing are sent to a guy right next to the dugout who has a sheet of barcodes. He slaps a barcode on the item and then enters the situation into a computer (e.g., foul tip on a 2-2 count in the bottom of the 3rd inning v. Cardinals w/ Joey Votto batting and Al Hrabosky pitching). I guess there is some market for people to buy such things but for the life of me I can't understand who'd want such a "game used souvenir."

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    B-Ball-fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpa2825 View Post
    A lot of batted balls are also taken out of play. Unless you're at the game OR get an unusual camera angle, you don't see it. You see all the pitched balls that bounce and are taken out of play because that is where the camera is focused.

    Also, authentication is a huge thing now. If you ever notice, just about every ball taken out of play, broken bats and other things I am guessing are sent to a guy right next to the dugout who has a sheet of barcodes. He slaps a barcode on the item and then enters the situation into a computer (e.g., foul tip on a 2-2 count in the bottom of the 3rd inning v. Cardinals w/ Joey Votto batting and Al Hrabosky pitching). I guess there is some market for people to buy such things but for the life of me I can't understand who'd want such a "game used souvenir."
    If I had any say in it, I'd have them donate all the used balls to little league and knothole teams to practice with and/or let the kids have them as souvenirs.

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    sweet16's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpa2825 View Post
    A lot of batted balls are also taken out of play. Unless you're at the game OR get an unusual camera angle, you don't see it. You see all the pitched balls that bounce and are taken out of play because that is where the camera is focused.

    Also, authentication is a huge thing now. If you ever notice, just about every ball taken out of play, broken bats and other things I am guessing are sent to a guy right next to the dugout who has a sheet of barcodes. He slaps a barcode on the item and then enters the situation into a computer (e.g., foul tip on a 2-2 count in the bottom of the 3rd inning v. Cardinals w/ Joey Votto batting and Al Hrabosky pitching). I guess there is some market for people to buy such things but for the life of me I can't understand who'd want such a "game used souvenir."
    It's amazing how many the game used store at Busch have.

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    kinglouie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jpa2825 View Post
    A lot of batted balls are also taken out of play. Unless you're at the game OR get an unusual camera angle, you don't see it. You see all the pitched balls that bounce and are taken out of play because that is where the camera is focused.

    Also, authentication is a huge thing now. If you ever notice, just about every ball taken out of play, broken bats and other things I am guessing are sent to a guy right next to the dugout who has a sheet of barcodes. He slaps a barcode on the item and then enters the situation into a computer (e.g., foul tip on a 2-2 count in the bottom of the 3rd inning v. Cardinals w/ Joey Votto batting and Al Hrabosky pitching). I guess there is some market for people to buy such things but for the life of me I can't understand who'd want such a "game used souvenir."

    They have a store at GABP that sells these. I was shocked the first time I saw one that was a pitch in the dirt, and the selling price was $40

    Why would someone pay this? No clue, but not me.

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