Advice from those that have been there

Page 2 of I thought we could use a thread where those of you that have more experience with the ins & outs of volleyball, whether it be club ball, high schoo... 32 comments | 5113 Views | Go to page 1 →

  1. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by kris10claire View Post
    In high school, refs should never be making double contact calls on the first touch of each possession. Every time a team gets a new set of 3 hits, the rules prohibit calling a double contact on the first of the 3 touches, no matter how ugly. A lift can still be called, though.
    I do agree the calls on the 2nd and 3rd touches are incredibly inconsistent. However, in 15+ years of volleyball, as a player and a coach, my experience is that refs generally are not inconsistent between 2 teams playing each other, but refs are inconsistent between each other. Some refs call nothing, some call everything.
    All that is true... however just this season I have witnessed refs call a double on first contact.
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  2. #17

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    Not to bust bubbles but the NCAA limit for total scholarships to a DI or DII school for volleyball is 4.5 so basically no one gets a full ride to play volleyball on the collegiate level. There are a few who can bundle academic money with a limit volleyball money to get it to almost a full ride but full ride on only a vb scholarship will be extremely limited.

  3. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by jakeandabby View Post
    Not to bust bubbles but the NCAA limit for total scholarships to a DI or DII school for volleyball is 4.5 so basically no one gets a full ride to play volleyball on the collegiate level. There are a few who can bundle academic money with a limit volleyball money to get it to almost a full ride but full ride on only a vb scholarship will be extremely limited.
    This board is about GIRL'S volleyball, not boys. All NCAA D1 Women Volleyball has 12 full rides, men have 4.5. Thank you Title IX and football.

    A Handy Guide to Volleyball Scholarships | ACTIVE

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakeandabby View Post
    Not to bust bubbles but the NCAA limit for total scholarships to a DI or DII school for volleyball is 4.5 so basically no one gets a full ride to play volleyball on the collegiate level. There are a few who can bundle academic money with a limit volleyball money to get it to almost a full ride but full ride on only a vb scholarship will be extremely limited.
    What does the bolded mean?

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bengal Maniac View Post
    What does the bolded mean?
    I believe that stands for 4 and a half schollys.

  6. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by jakeandabby View Post
    Not to bust bubbles but the NCAA limit for total scholarships to a DI or DII school for volleyball is 4.5 so basically no one gets a full ride to play volleyball on the collegiate level. There are a few who can bundle academic money with a limit volleyball money to get it to almost a full ride but full ride on only a vb scholarship will be extremely limited.
    This is extremely inaccurate. A fully funded D1 girl's program has 12 full scholarships and they are not permitted to split them. Many female athletes in NKY will receive full volleyball scholarships.

  7. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by EQUUS GREVYI View Post
    This is extremely inaccurate. A fully funded D1 girl's program has 12 full scholarships and they are not permitted to split them. Many female athletes in NKY will receive full volleyball scholarships.
    Absolutely correct. D1 volleyball is a headcount sport as well. The 12 scholarships at a fully funded school cannot be split either. Schools with larger rosters will typically have freshman/sophomores walk on with the expectation of a scholarship in years 3 and 4. This is very common with players at the DS position.

    With some very specific limited exceptions, some academic money can be provided to freshman based on GPA and ACT scores. There are plenty of girls from KY on full rides.

  8. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by jakeandabby View Post
    Not to bust bubbles but the NCAA limit for total scholarships to a DI or DII school for volleyball is 4.5 so basically no one gets a full ride to play volleyball on the collegiate level. There are a few who can bundle academic money with a limit volleyball money to get it to almost a full ride but full ride on only a vb scholarship will be extremely limited.
    That is completely false for women's volleyball. From a % standpoint, you have a better shot at a 4 year full ride in volleyball than soccer and softball. Put down that glove, put away the cleats, and get in the gym.

  9. #24

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    Can't let a good thread die............

    Any advice on recruiting or playing at the college level? What can parents do to help their darling daughters possibly get recruited? Not the top 1% that are 6'5 and can dunk a basketball and everyone knows their name but the other girls that are not as fortunate or gifted but still love the game and want to play on a collegiate level?

  10. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Volleyball Dad View Post
    Can't let a good thread die............

    Any advice on recruiting or playing at the college level? What can parents do to help their darling daughters possibly get recruited? Not the top 1% that are 6'5 and can dunk a basketball and everyone knows their name but the other girls that are not as fortunate or gifted but still love the game and want to play on a collegiate level?
    My advice would be to be realistic in the pursuit of play at the next level. If a D1 ride is not probable then consider a D2 school. If a D2 offer is not possible then consider a D3 bundle with academics/grants etc. but only if it males sense economically.

  11. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Volleyball Dad View Post
    Can't let a good thread die............

    Any advice on recruiting or playing at the college level? What can parents do to help their darling daughters possibly get recruited? Not the top 1% that are 6'5 and can dunk a basketball and everyone knows their name but the other girls that are not as fortunate or gifted but still love the game and want to play on a collegiate level?
    While you don't have to be in the top 1% to play college sports, you still need at least be in the top 3%-4%. And that's to play at any level. Simply the love of the game is not enough to get you on a college roster.

  12. #27

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    *If your daughter wants to play in college, start working on it early (9th Grade)
    *Be realistic about which colleges to consider (most girls aren't going to play DI)
    *Complete as many free online profiles as possible and update them regularly
    *E-mail college coaches regularly to let them know you are interested
    *Start videotaping games on a regular basis and put together professional highlights
    *Visit colleges and attend camps that you are interested in and request meetings with the coach
    *Attend large showcases
    *Respond to every coach that shows interest in your daughter whether their college is your first choice or not. Until you have secured a spot on a team, every outreach from a coach is an opportunity to eventually play in college. Don't shut doors prematurely.
    *Good luck!

  13. #28

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    Thank you Cincyslp. that is more of what I was asking. What are some "legit" free online profile sites as opposed to others which may be scams? Have any of you had experience using these sites? And if possible, could you share a little how these things work?

  14. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cincyslp View Post
    *If your daughter wants to play in college, start working on it early (9th Grade)
    *Be realistic about which colleges to consider (most girls aren't going to play DI)
    *Complete as many free online profiles as possible and update them regularly
    *E-mail college coaches regularly to let them know you are interested
    *Start videotaping games on a regular basis and put together professional highlights
    *Visit colleges and attend camps that you are interested in and request meetings with the coach
    *Attend large showcases
    *Respond to every coach that shows interest in your daughter whether their college is your first choice or not. Until you have secured a spot on a team, every outreach from a coach is an opportunity to eventually play in college. Don't shut doors prematurely.
    *Good luck!
    *With rare exceptions, you must play club volleyball to be recruited.

    You want to play for the highest level club, the highest profile club, that you can. Even if that means sitting on the bench. Even if that means being on the 2nd or 3rd team. It may sound backwards, but you are better off being on the bench on the first team at the highest club, or starting on the 2nd team at the highest club vs starting for the 1st team for a medium or lower level club. How do you tell the difference? Look at who's playing in the Open division, look at who's playing in National Qualifiers where literally hundreds of coaches will see you, look at the club's track record on recruiting.

    Why? Because the coaching at a higher club is better and the players around your daughter at a higher club will be better, which will in turn make her better. It's not about playing time, it's about getting better. It's also not all about winning, but playing a tough schedule against national competition to make you better. Stick with that plan and the college looks will come, even with limited playing time.

  15. #30

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    The following websites provide free and paid memberships:
    NCSA
    CaptainU
    University Athelete
    You can create a free profile on MaxPreps as well.
    You may find it beneficial to have one paid recruiting membership because they will edit your highlights for you, provide background information on all of the colleges you are interested in and help get your daughter's information out to a variety of coaches. You can do it all on your own but it will take more time. My daughter did have a paid profile on NCSA at their middle tier. I do think it was helpful for her but we still needed to do a lot of work on our end.

    My daughter was able to get a scholarship to an NAIA school but it took a lot of e-mails, and college visits until she found the right situation. Your daughter will need to be the one talking to the coaches but she will need your help to guide her through the process. The only girls that have it easy are the ones being recruited by Division I schools in their 10th grade year.

    I'm not sure if I completely agree with the above statement about sitting on the bench for a top rated team. The only way to get seen by recruiters is when you are playing so if you are on the bench you may not get recruited. However you do need to play for a club that is attending Regional and National tournaments and participating in Premier and Open events. The recruiters primarly focus their time at tournaments on teams playing in these two divisions. However, coaches may come and see your daughter if she is playing in the Club Division if you have been in contact with them and they are impressed with highlights you have sent them.

    Some things that I learned along the way were 1) although Division III schools can't give athletic scholarships, a lot of times their academic scholarships can match the athletic/academic scholarships given by NAIA and Division II schools 2) being willing to go out of state or a little farther from home might help you be successful in obtaining a volleyball scholarship or a spot on a team 3) social media is closely monitored by college coaches and can ruin even a top recruit's chances at a scholarship 4) your daughters attitude on and off the court at tournaments matters...you never know when a college coach might be standing behind you in the food line.

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