There is nothing like High School Football, and we need to remember that

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  1. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by rjs4470 View Post
    What about the kid that decides a job is more important than sports? Is he a pansy?? I love sports, and would recommend all kids find a sport they love to play. But sports aren't for everyone, especially contact sports. The toughest kids for coaches to deal with are the ones who's parents are making them them play, and don't really want to be there.
    Well they have their whole life to work, only 4 years to play ball
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  2. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by mountain ref View Post
    Well they have their whole life to work, only 4 years to play ball
    True. And I'll tell any kid that'll listen to give football a shot. I know I wouldn't be where I'm at now had I not played sports. And Friday night under the lights still gets me going. But again, football isn't for everyone.

  3. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde View Post
    Zero chance I am criticizing any parent who has safety concerns about the sport. Too many questions (on both sides) and many are choosing to err on the side of safety.

    Again, your gross generalizations are just too much.
    I will, because most of the time it's the same parent that lets their kid go skateboarding down at the park with no helmet on and doesnt bat an eye about it.

  4. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde View Post
    Zero chance I am criticizing any parent who has safety concerns about the sport. Too many questions (on both sides) and many are choosing to err on the side of safety.

    Again, your gross generalizations are just too much.
    And same parents let their kids go get on 4 wheelers too.

    Also a leading cause of death with kids.

  5. #20
    oldgrappler's Avatar
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    Playing for "community pride," and "alongside friends" etc. is the way I remember it. My experience here in NKY is that there is less community pride than where I grew up. More of it now has to do with personal goals, how to get to the next level, etc. Perhaps you cannot blame them, but that is not community pride and playing alongside friends. It is more about what is best for "me".

    Too many players find a way to play for another school, even for a rival school, than for the high school associated with their address. No way on God's green earth that I would have played for my arch rival just because their program was on an upswing and our school's was on a down swing. I wouldn't even wear street clothes that resembled the arch rival's colors, even when a certain combination of the colors were consistent with Ohio State colors. My school's colors also resembled OSU colors but it depended on how much black or how much gray was showing in combination with crimson whether it matched my schools colors or the arch-rivals colors. Listen, I HATED that other school and there is no way I would play on THAT team, period.

    I don't find that same kind of loyalty to community and team identity in Boone County. Perhaps that is because Boone County is transient. People move from somewhere else and don't have that strong bond to their community but for whatever reason there isn't that same kind of loyalty to school and community that I had when I was in school.

    The article has a point, but times are changing.

  6. #21

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    The best friends I've ever had played on a team with me. Same for my kids. In fact, the most influential people in my life have been parents, grandparents, coaches and team mates. Not sure what I would have done if I didn't have sports growing up.

  7. #22

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    I think it's tough saying that parents are raising pansies because they may not want there kids to play football. I was one that had the exact same stance as you, before learned more and more about the dangers of the sport itself. The same reason you have legends like Ed Reed that say I played football so that my son doesn't have to. Learning more and more about the dangers of it has changed my stance as a father. For you it's 4 years of high school. For me I see the many years of pop warner, middle school now, high school, and if my son is good enough, college and so on. I played college basketball, and believe that athletics is a must in my development of my son. Some things you get from team sports and coaching are life lessons that help in everyday life. After watching movies like "Concussion" and reading up on the safety of the sport, I wouldn't say that parents are making their kids soft for not letting them play football with the public knowledge spread about CTE the past 10 years. Yes they can die quicker in a car, but it's not just about them dying, it's their quality of life down the line. I love football, and I'm as tough as they come. I'm a U.S. veteran and ex athlete. I'm not going to chance my son having long term issues when it's now known those are the risks. He's eventually going to have to learn to drive to get around effectively in these days. Doesn't have to play football, but shouldn't be labeled as soft for not playing it. Now not making kids be active or coddling yes, but because they don't play football for safety concerns, no.

  8. #23

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    It is really lame that this thread's opening statement has been taken over by "kids nowadays are soft". Obviously kids get softer every generation, but probably less than perceived. We think we were so tough in our day. Plus, some kids are still tough despite softer parenting.

    Anyways H.S. is the purest form of football, and I believe is underrated. What Guru said about community and the life bond with teammates is true. H.S. Football is closest thing there is to ancient tribe vs tribe human battle in America. Your neighbor's son and his best friend from 1st grade are in the trenches battling two guys from the next town over that grew up together as well. It's in our DNA and that is why it is so much more popular than all other H.S. sports combined.

  9. #24
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    Found this article and thought it was pretty good:

    Football: The team sport accepting of everybody, yes, even you and me
    SEPTEMBER 27, 2012 BY THE BEACON, University of Portland

    By PJ Marcello, Staff Commentary

    No, I know what you are thinking and I refuse to play into it. I will not be some obnoxious blowhard demanding that you understand how much better American football is and attack what we refer to over here as soccer. At least I won’t be that guy for this article.

    However, do not confuse this with me conceding the point. I firmly believe tackle football is the better sport and I will now share with you some reasons why.

    I have respect for all athletes, or simply anyone who goes out and puts an effort into a sport they love. For me, this sport is football. I have often wondered why I chose football, but I, like many other fans and players, did not choose football, it chose us.

    I grew up the chubby kid. I say chubby because it makes me feel better. I was not, as my mom said, “big-boned” or “husky,” no, I was the fat kid. Being the fat kid did not exclude me from loving sports. I loved sports with a fiery passion, a passion that rivals Angelina Jolie’s intense fervor for adopting foreign babies. However, unlike Ms. Jolie’s ability to adopt any kid on any given continent, I could not simply go out and play any sport I wanted.

    This is where football interrupted my terribly anti-athletic reality. It bumped and prodded its way into my life to the point where it could no longer be ignored. After years of disappointment on the basketball court, hopelessly trying to round the bases on the baseball diamond and taking puff after puff on my inhaler following a frantic soccer ball chase, my sport had finally found me, and I was not alone.

    Fat kids, skinny kids, slow kids, kids that wore glasses, kids with asthma, we all found our home with football. We had found a place where we all had a role to fill on the team, and we were all necessary in winning the game. My weight was no longer a liability on the field of play, rather an advantage. The fact that my buddy John was not the best with his feet did not destroy his opportunity of playing. He could catch anything you threw his way and that is how he earned his place on the team. We even have an important spot for all the people who really just prefer to kick things through cross bars. Everyone is welcome in the game of football.

    But, as you should know, this is not even the best part of football. It was great that we are all welcome to find our places on the team, but more importantly are the life skills that this sport presents to its participants. They call it the “ultimate team sport” for a reason.

    We learned how to work together. Regardless of how you feel about your teammates off the field, you sure care about them when you are on the field. If one person did not do their job in the game, we all paid for it. We had to trust the person next to us to do what they were supposed to and they had to trust us equally. If we could not do that, then the play would fail or someone could get hurt. In no way is the gridiron anything like a battlefield in war, but there is a sort of comaraderie players must have in working as a unit. It is our own mini battlefield out there; you look out for your teammates because you know they are looking out for you.

    We learned toughness. We were taught that when someone bumps into you, even if it is harder than you prefer, you stay up and keep going. I dare you to flop to try to get a penalty called in front of my former coach Kohler. He would give you a good reason to lie on the field and look injured if you tried to pull something like that. If you do not have grit on the gridiron, you are not having a good time.

    We learned to move on from mistakes and pick each other up in our defeats. If one messed up play gets the best of you mentally or emotionally, you might as well take yourself out of the game. Or, if the man next to you slips up and you berate him, you just guaranteed your team another mistake. Just like in the real world, you have to have a short memory when it comes to your mistakes and move on to the next play. You remind yourself that you will live to see another day and you will do better the next time, dwelling on past mistakes never does anyone any good.

    Unfortunately, I cannot fit everything I need to say about football into one article in the back of The Beacon, but if you ever want to discuss it further, feel free to contact me. With that, I will leave you with one final belief of mine.

    Some people say that nothing in this world is perfect, but there are a few things I would argue for: a mother’s love for her children, my Dad’s smoked salmon and football. You may never get to indulge in the smoked salmon, but I hope you all find a way to enjoy as much as you can of the other two.

  10. #25

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    The article seems to close on the issue of the 'professionalism' of high school football.

    These type issues are probably much more of an issue in the southern SEC states.

    Its a valid concern where it detracts from the experience of football for the 'average' student playing the game.

    The article does not touch on the other issue of football - the concussion/injury aspect. And that is probably more of a threat to the actual existence of the sport at the HS level than the professionalism aspect.

    Football as a sport seems under attack in regards to the concussion issue. To blunt this there should be acknowledgement - at all levels of the game - that the sport can and does take a toll. I do not believe that the issue is extremely severe at the HS level and below. But the repetitive and somewhat cumulative nature of the sport should be acknowledged with focus on safety and avoidance of over-working players with longer and longer seasons with more and more games and more and more contact practice.

    Having seen the early stages of the 'concussion phenomena' its clear that some kids are concussion prone and some are not. It is something that should be taken more and more seriously but without tossing out the baby with the bath water as they say.

  11. #26

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    Maybe that's why I enjoyed JV so much last year. No alumni pressure or ulterior motives. Just 11 v 11 with refs and scoreboard.

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