Parents' Views of Football

  1. #1

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    Parents' Views of Football

    20% more parents today as compared to four years ago would discourage their child from playing football. Not good for the long term.


    Poll: Nearly half of parents would discourage football due to concussions - NBC News
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    It is our job as coaches and fans of this great game to sell it now more than ever. While the game is not perfect, it is safer in its current form than it has ever been. The benefits of the game far outweigh the downfalls.

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    Until these large media companies start telling the other side of the stories from the numerous of doctors and studies out there who encourage playing (advantages outweighing risks) then crap like this from them and others is just garbage. War on football garbage.

    Bruin66 said it all. It’s safer now than it’s ever been and it’s not even close.

    None of these media outlets talk about the concussion risks of sports like soccer, but they know that millions aren’t watching it every weekend in the fall either. The overall interest in soccer to the masses doesn’t compare.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Calico Jack View Post
    Until these large media companies start telling the other side of the stories from the numerous of doctors and studies out there who encourage playing (advantages outweighing risks) then crap like this from them and others is just garbage. War on football garbage.

    Bruin66 said it all. It’s safer now than it’s ever been and it’s not even close.

    None of these media outlets talk about the concussion risks of sports like soccer, but they know that millions aren’t watching it every weekend in the fall either. The overall interest in soccer to the masses doesn’t compare.
    We can't just sit back and let our game be destroyed by misinformation, though. We have to actively sell it and its benefits. We have to be proactive instead of reactive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Calico Jack View Post
    Until these large media companies start telling the other side of the stories from the numerous of doctors and studies out there who encourage playing (advantages outweighing risks) then crap like this from them and others is just garbage. War on football garbage.

    Bruin66 said it all. It’s safer now than it’s ever been and it’s not even close.

    None of these media outlets talk about the concussion risks of sports like soccer, but they know that millions aren’t watching it every weekend in the fall either. The overall interest in soccer to the masses doesn’t compare.
    Soccer does have concussions but not at the rate of football.

    Stats on Concussions </br> & Sports - Head Case - Complete Concussion Managements

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    Quote Originally Posted by bruin66 View Post
    It is our job as coaches and fans of this great game to sell it now more than ever. While the game is not perfect, it is safer in its current form than it has ever been. The benefits of the game far outweigh the downfalls.
    What are you basing this claim on? Don't get me wrong, I love football just as much as anybody. I played from the ages of 10-18. There are of course great benefits to playing football. I learned teamwork, sacrifice, and responsibility not to mention I just had a lot of fun and great memories. However, none of those are unique to football, they are unique to playing a team sport in general. With the science becoming more and more clear of the damage that can be done even at an early age and even with proper techniques and safety regulations in place why would a parent not lean toward having their kid play a safer sport where the same valuable life lessons can be learned? I know when the time comes I'm going to have to think long and hard before letting my future sons sign up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bruin66 View Post
    We can't just sit back and let our game be destroyed by misinformation, though. We have to actively sell it and its benefits. We have to be proactive instead of reactive.
    Absolutely.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ColonelPops View Post
    Soccer does have concussions but not at the rate of football.

    Stats on Concussions </br> & Sports - Head Case - Complete Concussion Managements
    No. It doesn’t. I agree. But it’s the next closest sport that’s available to most in comparison to football.

    And those numbers per 100,000 splitting hairs in the grand scheme of things boys soccer to football.

    I’m 100% for the game being safer. It needs to be. I just wish they’d show the other perspective instead of all negative (at least from the mainstream media outlets).

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    Pansies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lil Sebastian View Post
    What are you basing this claim on? Don't get me wrong, I love football just as much as anybody. I played from the ages of 10-18. There are of course great benefits to playing football. I learned teamwork, sacrifice, and responsibility not to mention I just had a lot of fun and great memories. However, none of those are unique to football, they are unique to playing a team sport in general. With the science becoming more and more clear of the damage that can be done even at an early age and even with proper techniques and safety regulations in place why would a parent not lean toward having their kid play a safer sport where the same valuable life lessons can be learned? I know when the time comes I'm going to have to think long and hard before letting my future sons sign up.
    The elements. It’s tougher than others with the exception of wrestling (that would take the cake).

    Not everybody gets to bat. Not everybody gets to score. The temperature is from the 90s to below freezing. It’s not always 70 degrees and sunny (basketball) always wearing shorts and a T-shirt. Off season programs are more demanding. You work and practice far more than you play compared to other sports and it’s not even remotely close.

    I played three sports and a couple years four all through high school and none of the rest compared.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lil Sebastian View Post
    What are you basing this claim on? Don't get me wrong, I love football just as much as anybody. I played from the ages of 10-18. There are of course great benefits to playing football. I learned teamwork, sacrifice, and responsibility not to mention I just had a lot of fun and great memories. However, none of those are unique to football, they are unique to playing a team sport in general. With the science becoming more and more clear of the damage that can be done even at an early age and even with proper techniques and safety regulations in place why would a parent not lean toward having their kid play a safer sport where the same valuable life lessons can be learned? I know when the time comes I'm going to have to think long and hard before letting my future sons sign up.
    First of all, I am a fan of all sports, and I think there are benefits to all of them. My children play a wide variety of them. One thing that makes football unique is the team aspect of it. You have to depend on your teammates and they have to depend on you more than any other sport. No matter how good that QB is, he must have a good snap from the center, good blocking from his line and backs, good routes by the receivers, and the receiver has to catch the ball. That has to all be a coordinated effort. Additionally, football requires a high physical toughness. Hitting, playing through some pain, overcoming adversity. Although these are not innate to some players, they can be developed. Football requires playing in all types of weather. In the beginning of the season, intense heat. In the playoffs, cold weather. Football also a delayed gratification sport for the most part. It usually involves sacrificing early, getting bigger and stronger while learning techniques, and finally showing your stuff.

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    This makes me physically sick. Parents these days have lost sight of the big picture. Why work hard when you can play video games all day.

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    This is a difficult one because I, like most people on here, love football. I played in high school and did sustain a significant physical injury. Still played my senior year and no repercussions since. My sons played at the highest high school level, and while I loved it, was quite relieved after each of the last games that it was over, with no significant injuries. I don't know what the answer is, but we can't ignore the injury factor and the subsequent backlash. Neither are going away.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TribePride View Post
    This makes me physically sick. Parents these days have lost sight of the big picture. Why work hard when you can play video games all day.
    I don't think this has anything to do with video games, or laziness. I've been coaching for the last decade+ and if anything kids work harder now than ever. It comes down to options. There are so many different activities/sports that kids can do, that parent's feel are safer. Whether it's playing baseball or basketball year round, or band, theater or whatever, there's lots of things that kids can do at a high level that don't involve the physical punishment that's found in football. It really grinds me to hear people label kid's today as soft or lazy, when the reality is we push our kids harder than ever to excel everywhere. And when they don't, and get sick of it, then they get called lazy.

    We have to keep innovating, and educating about the game to keep kids and parents interested. And we've got to do more at lower levels to keep it safe and fun, otherwise, kids will simply find other stuff to do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rjs4470 View Post
    It really grinds me to hear people label kid's today as soft
    Kids are absolutely getting more soft. Now whether or not that affects whether or not they play football, that's a different discussion.

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