Parents' Views of Football

Page 3 of 20% more parents today as compared to four years ago would discourage their child from playing football. Not good for the long term. Poll: Nearly half ... 62 comments | 4562 Views | Go to page 1 →

  1. #31

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    Its not just about football. What are the percentages of kids playing anything today compared to the days of old. How many kids ride bikes, climb trees, or work manually in a real job that will give them some grit. How many quit when adversity strikes rather than be a part of the solution. There are tons of things that can be pointed at in our soft society of walking around with only one hand available, because the other has a cell phone in it. I dont blame kids at all. We all know where the blame is. I will close with "If it was good enough for my father, then it is good enough for me and it will be good enough for my son."
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  2. #32

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    I think we are conflating a lot of issues into this thread not related to football. The thread question is about whether a parent wants his kid to play football. I already gave my view. Believe me, the fact that I would not want my kid to play football does not make me "soft" and I resent the implication. I may be a lot of things but soft is not one of them. As we learn more about head injuries, any parent should want to know more about whether the pros outweigh the cons of playing football. Reasonable people may look at the information and come to different answers but to dismiss people that are not excited about their kid playing football as soft is just lazy and ridiculous IMO.
    And I do think that as a society we have coddled our kids in the last 10-20 years. But that is a different thread topic.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by P_G View Post
    Nothing on this earth is as valuable as the mind of a child. If caring about that is soft, you can call me Charmin.
    Would you settle for Mr. Whipple?

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  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by ggclfan View Post
    I think we are conflating a lot of issues into this thread not related to football. The thread question is about whether a parent wants his kid to play football. I already gave my view. Believe me, the fact that I would not want my kid to play football does not make me "soft" and I resent the implication. I may be a lot of things but soft is not one of them. As we learn more about head injuries, any parent should want to know more about whether the pros outweigh the cons of playing football. Reasonable people may look at the information and come to different answers but to dismiss people that are not excited about their kid playing football as soft is just lazy and ridiculous IMO.
    And I do think that as a society we have coddled our kids in the last 10-20 years. But that is a different thread topic.
    I completely agree. I played football....well. All State, had opps to play in college. I’ve been a football coach for many years. And I agree, it’s a tough sport. And I feel like I was pretty tough. But I wouldn’t have lasted 5 minutes in the soccer field. My boxing career lasted 2 rounds into my first sparring match when I got popped in the nose. I tried to learn how to skate to play hockey, and couldn’t go more than a few feet at full speed without falling and landing on ice that was way too hard. And what I watch my son who wrestles (who quit football by the way),put himself through every week, amazes me. Football isn’t the end all and be all on the toughness spectrum, and playing it doesn’t put you on the top of the food chain. Despite being a tough football player, there were and still are plenty of things I’m not tough enough to do. Once again, we overestimate how important or difficult something is because we love it so much. I watch too many kids work too hard at too many different things besides football to buy into the “todays kids are soft” argument.

    I’m doing everything I can to save the sport of football. And calling the kids that don’t want to play soft, isn’t endearing the sport to those kids or the parents we are trying to get onboard.

  5. #35

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    I never ran Cross Country because there was nothing I could bring to the table in that sport plus it would have been miserable for me. I would like to consider myself as always being pretty fit, but running distance of any kind just wasn't my thing. If they had some weight class divisions then maybe so, but they don't.

    I didn't wrestle in high school due to playing basketball, but looking back at it I probably missed out on the single best thing I could have done to develop myself as a football player (and a life skill in being able to defend myself) in a lot of ways. There is no doubt whatsoever that it would have been tougher than basketball, and I know that had a lot to do with my decision at the time (self awareness is key; I can say that now and I regret to this day not stepping up to the plate and giving the mat a try).

    Not every sport is for every kid from an ability standpoint- nor close, but I will stand by my opinion all day long that I think a large part of the reason as to why many kids out there refrain from playing football is due to the physical demands that are outside of the contact (the lifting, the heat in the summer and flat out grunt work that goes into making you a better player as compared to other sports). There isn't anybody out there that can tell me that if other sports such as basketball and baseball that if they played less games & required off seasons like football or even played half as many games (practicing much more than you play) that you'd see some think twice about playing (probably more than just some).

    This is off topic, kind of, but I'd love to see soccer be in the spring like it is in every other state in the south b/c I think it definitely requires a certain level of toughness to overcome the elements . I also think you'd see quite a bit of sharing in participation between sports. (my previous soccer 'gripe' was with thinking it's a safer alternative than football in the grand scheme of things and when you split hairs it is, but not enough for me to say to hell with one sport for in favor for another one).
    @jlow went a step further in what he meant by saying "Our society has gotten soft." I haven't seen anybody in the end on here disagree with that.

    Back to the topic (along with in closing on my last post in this topic), and my original point: I'm sick of only hearing one side of the football coin.

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Calico Jack View Post
    I never ran Cross Country because there was nothing I could bring to the table in that sport plus it would have been miserable for me. I would like to consider myself as always being pretty fit, but running distance of any kind just wasn't my thing. If they had some weight class divisions then maybe so, but they don't.

    I didn't wrestle in high school due to playing basketball, but looking back at it I probably missed out on the single best thing I could have done to develop myself as a football player (and a life skill in being able to defend myself) in a lot of ways. There is no doubt whatsoever that it would have been tougher than basketball, and I know that had a lot to do with my decision at the time (self awareness is key; I can say that now and I regret to this day not stepping up to the plate and giving the mat a try).

    Not every sport is for every kid from an ability standpoint- nor close, but I will stand by my opinion all day long that I think a large part of the reason as to why many kids out there refrain from playing football is due to the physical demands that are outside of the contact (the lifting, the heat in the summer and flat out grunt work that goes into making you a better player as compared to other sports). There isn't anybody out there that can tell me that if other sports such as basketball and baseball that if they played less games & required off seasons like football or even played half as many games (practicing much more than you play) that you'd see some think twice about playing (probably more than just some).

    This is off topic, kind of, but I'd love to see soccer be in the spring like it is in every other state in the south b/c I think it definitely requires a certain level of toughness to overcome the elements . I also think you'd see quite a bit of sharing in participation between sports. (my previous soccer 'gripe' was with thinking it's a safer alternative than football in the grand scheme of things and when you split hairs it is, but not enough for me to say to hell with one sport for in favor for another one).
    @jlow went a step further in what he meant by saying "Our society has gotten soft." I haven't seen anybody in the end on here disagree with that.

    Back to the topic (along with in closing on my last post in this topic), and my original point: I'm sick of only hearing one side of the football coin.
    Football is hard work. But I don’t think it’s the hard work part that’s keeping kids away. Again, there are way too many kids out their busting theirs butts doing other things. Almost any activity requires lots of off season training and weight lifting is requirement for success in almost every sport....it’s not unique to football. I think that arrogance and refusal of many to acknowledge the dangers of the sport (which the NFL has done since the very beginning) is more of a turnoff to the sport than the hard work that’s involved.

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by rjs4470 View Post
    Football is hard work. But I donít think itís the hard work part thatís keeping kids away. Again, there are way too many kids out their busting theirs butts doing other things. Almost any activity requires lots of off season training and weight lifting is requirement for success in almost every sport....itís not unique to football. I think that arrogance and refusal of many to acknowledge the dangers of the sport (which the NFL has done since the very beginning) is more of a turnoff to the sport than the hard work thatís involved.
    Well sure the concussion scare has been a cause, and that's why I get so sick of the media only blasting that side of thing. You aren't going to find anybody out there who is all for making the game safer than me (I think the targeting call is largely subjective, but I'm not really sure how to make that better than what we have).

    We can agree to disagree on the rest. The offseason grind of having to live in the weight room along with the fact that not everybody gets a chance to score, swing a bat, throw the ball, catch the ball along with the climate (plus the gear you have to wear in those conditions), the lack of games in comparison to the work & practice that goes into it has just as much if not more with deterring kids (who are able and could bring a ton of opportunities to themselves and families- not talking NFL; talking scholarship opportunities) with not playing. You don't have to believe or accept that nor does anybody else.

    In high school for the vast majority of programs the off season work (not open gym, not fall ball, not AAU) from a team aspect isn't even close. The July, August, September heat along with the gear & less games absolutely deters kids from playing.

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Calico Jack View Post
    Well sure the concussion scare has been a cause, and that's why I get so sick of the media only blasting that side of thing. You aren't going to find anybody out there who is all for making the game safer than me (I think the targeting call is largely subjective, but I'm not really sure how to make that better than what we have).

    We can agree to disagree on the rest. The offseason grind of having to live in the weight room along with the fact that not everybody gets a chance to score, swing a bat, throw the ball, catch the ball along with the climate (plus the gear you have to wear in those conditions), the lack of games in comparison to the work & practice that goes into it has just as much if not more with deterring kids (who are able and could bring a ton of opportunities to themselves and families- not talking NFL; talking scholarship opportunities) with not playing. You don't have to believe or accept that nor does anybody else.

    In high school for the vast majority of programs the off season work (not open gym, not fall ball, not AAU) from a team aspect isn't even close. The July, August, September heat along with the gear & less games absolutely deters kids from playing.
    I’ll certaiy agree Football can be a grind. But all the major sports (at least at my local school) hold pretty structured off season, almost year round conditioning/workouts. Kids are perfectly willing to work hard for something they love and want to do.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDeuce View Post
    Pansies.
    Couldnít have said it better.

  10. #40

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    Don’t deter kids from anything. Encourage them to do everything....kids need to make their own decisions. If a child wants to join the military would all parents deter that decision knowing there is a combat chance of death? I hope not because then we wouldn’t have a military.

  11. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by ggclfan View Post
    I think we are conflating a lot of issues into this thread not related to football. The thread question is about whether a parent wants his kid to play football. I already gave my view. Believe me, the fact that I would not want my kid to play football does not make me "soft" and I resent the implication. I may be a lot of things but soft is not one of them. As we learn more about head injuries, any parent should want to know more about whether the pros outweigh the cons of playing football. Reasonable people may look at the information and come to different answers but to dismiss people that are not excited about their kid playing football as soft is just lazy and ridiculous IMO.
    And I do think that as a society we have coddled our kids in the last 10-20 years. But that is a different thread topic.
    Well stated. There are a lot of ways for kids to learn life lessons including other sports. Each sport has a unique set of positives including football. The issue is that we're getting smarter about head injuries and that's giving parents pause despite the positives that come with football.

  12. #42
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    I'''m a brain scientist and I let my son play football

    Good article from Dr. who studies brain trauma. Said he would let his kid play football.

  13. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tigerpride94 View Post
    I'''m a brain scientist and I let my son play football

    Good article from Dr. who studies brain trauma. Said he would let his kid play football.
    Exactly to my original point. The mainstream media will not touch these.

    Itís a crock of you know what in whatís let out and what isnít.

    Dr. OZ broadcasts into all our living rooms on a daily basis. He played and is all for it. Nobody is doing interviews with him during SB week, though.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tigerpride94 View Post
    I'''m a brain scientist and I let my son play football

    Good article from Dr. who studies brain trauma. Said he would let his kid play football.
    Great one, read it a while ago. Good scientific reasoning without all the hysteria.

    Quote Originally Posted by rjs4470 View Post
    I’ll certaiy agree Football can be a grind. But all the major sports (at least at my local school) hold pretty structured off season, almost year round conditioning/workouts. Kids are perfectly willing to work hard for something they love and want to do.
    Ask kids all the time in the hallway about football and always get the same answer: "I don't have the time." These are kids that don't do anything and kids that play other sports. I don't know what their parents say, but kids seem to think they have more important things to do than spend their time playing football. Take that as you will.

  15. #45

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    First of all, the latest study out shows that the concussion issue is a red herring & that sub-concussive hits are just as damaging. They also show evidence of CTE in TEENAGERS.

    There are some problems with the conclusions drawn in those studies, including the fact that there is no test for CTE for living people. Hard to draw concrete conclusions using only dead brains. That said, denying a connection, or that the connection is not particularly strong in football, is just plain denial.

    I played football. I coach football. I have a 6 year old son who, if he wants, will play football. I am not an anti-football nut. Nor am I soft. Those types of comments are wrongheaded and just further damage our game. Instead of attacking experts who are doing their jobs, maybe we should look at our game and figure out ways to prevent possible damage.

    For instance, I still believe we start tackle football WAY too soon. If you ask me, there is no reason kids need to be playing full-contact football before they are 12 years old. Also, there are still a lot of coaches doing too many contact drills & beating their kids up -- all in search of "toughness." These are just two changes that, I believe, would make the game safer for players at all levels.

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