Shot clocks in highschool?

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  1. #31
    TomSportsHack's Avatar
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    It works very well in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. It would probably work well everywhere.
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  2. #32
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    I am definately in favor of a shot clock! They aren't that expensive and I know of no schools in the 15th or 16th that would have trouble paying for them. If a school system can't raise a few thousand dollars tops from their fans and local businesses, then they probably don't have a good gate either. If the sport is that unpopular in a community, then why even have a team?

  3. #33
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    I think there should be a shot clock in high school basketball. It's not a problem on any other level of play, so why not.

  4. #34
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    My only complaint is that shot clocks were basically put in for the NBA and college ball to make the game high scoring and thus a better fit for T.V.ratings, etc.

    High school basketball is about the only pure form of basketball left. Most players know that they aren't going to have a career beyond high school and play for the love of the game and appear more willing to embrace the team concept than is done at big time college programs and the NBA.

    Why ruin a good thing. A team can only hold the ball against you if you left them. Get out there and put some pressure on the ball deny the passing lanes and earn yourself a 5 count. Get a few turnovers take the lead and the opponet will not be able to hold the ball. The defense is just as capable of forcing the action as is the offense.

  5. #35
    TomSportsHack's Avatar
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    No, it wasn't for TV ratings. It doesn't quite predate TV, but my guess is that when the NBA first started using one, most households in Kentucky (and Florida) didn't have a TV to watch anything on.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shot_clock

    Coach Howard Hobson, who coached at the University of Oregon and later Yale University, is credited with the idea. It first came to use in 1954 in Syracuse, New York, where Danny Biasone, the owner of the NBA's Syracuse Nationals, experimented using a 24-second version during a scrimmage game. Biasone then convinced the NBA to adopt it. His team went on to win the 1955 championship.

    Some say that this invention "saved the sport of basketball" as it had begun to lose fans before its inception. This was largely due to the stalling tactics used by teams once they were leading in a game (killing the clock). Without the shot clock, teams could pass the ball nearly endlessly without penalization. Very low-scoring games were common.

    When the shot clock first came into play, it made many players nervous, to the extent that the clock hardly came into play, as players were shooting much quicker than twenty seconds.

  6. #36
    strike-3's Avatar
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    TV ratings, ticket sales, same difference. The point of my post was to show that the shot clock was implemented more for financial reasons, than that it was purely a way to better the game. Its the same reason that Major League Baseball kept a blind eye to all the Hulk Hogan types for so long.

  7. #37
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    Economics is the only thing that has kept the shot clock out of Kentucky high school basketball, IMHO. A strain on many athletic departments' budgets.

    After the rash of low-scoring games in the Sweet 16 this year, look for serious discussion on this topic.

  8. #38
    TomSportsHack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by strike-3
    TV ratings, ticket sales, same difference. The point of my post was to show that the shot clock was implemented more for financial reasons, than that it was purely a way to better the game.
    That's ridiculous. Reread it. They implemented the shot clock in the NBA to save the game.

    Be serious for a minute: How many fans do you know who actually like to watch stall basketball?

  9. #39

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    I would like to see a shot clock in basketball but the crazy thing is football having the rule but no clock !!! Hats off to Belfry !!! If you have the rule you must have a clock !!!!!!! I hate when a ref calls this whenever they want to !!!!! The cost is not a point

  10. #40
    strike-3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomSportsHack
    That's ridiculous. Reread it. They implemented the shot clock in the NBA to save the game.

    Be serious for a minute: How many fans do you know who actually like to watch stall basketball?
    About as many as there are there are that enjoy a 1-0 pitchers duel where each team gets about 2 hits total. But that is part of the game. Save the game? Hardly. Save the NBA? Perhaps. The game of basketball wasn't created for the NBA. Within the original rules of basketball there is nothing wrong with running a patient offense. Make the other team guard you.

    I'm not going to disagree that a high scoring up tempo game will attract more fans. Just like baseball builds smaller parks, and football implements rules that favor the offense especially the receivers to increase scoring. Hockey did away with the red line. etc.

    My statements are not ridiculous, they are true it was implented in the NBA for financial reasons not because the sport and how it is played would be improved.

  11. #41
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    I don't see the cost that high. I recently watched University of Ohio - Southern Campus (In Ironton). Their Shot clock was a portable clock that they put on a table or maybe it was a chair at the end of the floor. I would think that is fairly cheap and its not an annual expense.

  12. #42
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    High School basketball doesn't need a shot clock. Watching teams like Graves run time off of the clock in 4 or 5 minute clips is great. The way the game is set up now you reward a team for being disciplined and well coached. It might not be the most exciting game to watch but it allows teams and coaches to use their heads and stay close to more athletic and talented teams.

  13. #43

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    After being a coach for the past 17 years, I am all for it. Several states went against the NFHS and added a shot clock. Their attendance went up dramatically. It creates a fun and enjoying style of basketball. A school can still hold the ball, look at Princeton, but it still picks up the pace of a game.

  14. #44

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    Very expensive to fund this type of thing, and in Kentucky most schools, especially Public can barely afford upkeep in their gymnasiums, much less Shot-Clock additions. I would love to see this happen, but untill some kind of funding comes through giving all KHSAA schools equal oppurtunity, then I see no way of this working.

  15. #45

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    Let's see...
    People don't want classification because it waters down the championships more kids could win and ruins their Sweet 16.

    People want a shot clock because it makes the game more fun for them to watch.

    Huh! And I thought HS athletics was about the kids.

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