Shot Clock For High School

Page 4 of I love high school basketball and attend a fair amount of games. Rarely am I at a game where a shot clock is needed because of stall ball. The vast maj... 61 comments | 3886 Views | Go to page 1 →

  1. #46
    PurplePride92's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde View Post
    Most teams that score in the 30s and 40s do so because they are not talented. Doesn't have to do with holding the ball.
    TRUTH!!!! Nobody purposely runs a stall ball offense designed to slow down the game consistently. Not to mention it takes two teams playing that way for it to even work. Pressure defense will thwart any stall ball plans.
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  2. #47

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    I would absolutely agree with a shot clock. I've seen teams go into a complete stall mode up 4 with 7 mins left. Very boring to watch. I've also watched teams lose games trying to stall when they weren't equipped to personnel wise. I'm okay with 35-40 secs. You can run 3 sets in that time, plus a one on one opportunity at the end of the possession. Discipline and running good offense is one thing, but slowing the game down and 1:30 possessions is a whole other world. I've seen teams try to lull the defense to sleep. Was very boring to watch.

  3. #48

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    Having seen games involving a lot of small schools over the past few years, there is no doubt this would be a problem for some schools, both in terms of expense and getting someone competent to run it.

  4. #49

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    There's a pretty good article on this topic on the National Federation of State High School Associations website (NFHS) from a year ago. There are multiple quotes form Commissioner Tackett, which suggest that a shot clock will not be implemented in Kentucky any time soon.
    By the way, it appears that there are 7 states that use a shot clock for boys high school basketball: California, Massachusetts, New York, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota and Washington.

  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by PurplePride92 View Post
    I think you are overestimating the ability for every school to have a booster club or parents who can help make this happen for their schools. I'd be interested in seeing how a school like Burgin could make this happen. KHSAA can't even get every school to do something for free like enter their stats weekly. No way they could mandate getting shot clocks for every school in the state. There are too many schools struggling that can't afford new textbooks let alone paying for a shot clock.
    I think schools not parents or boosters could pay for them. $1-2,000 out of a school systems budget isn't much. I'm pretty sure every system could find that amount. Temp Shot clocks can be found on line for much much less than that around a hundred dollars or so.

    Could use the Bernie Sander Method and have the top 1% schools buy them for everyone.

  6. #51
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    I'm divided.

    Obviously game strategy is different with or without a shot clock, and presently without one, stall ball is a legal acceptable strategy.

    Some prefer this option as part of the game, while others despise it, and depending what side of the stall ball you're on, your feelings towards it could possibly flip flop from game to game.

    With that said, I like to see teams have the ability to stay, or get back in a game when they're behind, and it frustrates and annoys me to no end when a team is up in the 4th period and they start eating clock.

    Sure it's and acceptable strategy of the game if they use this as a way to maintain their lead, and it's up to the other team to react with either tough defense or strategical fouls, but obviously the stall ball strategy mostly benefits the offense that is executing it, and seems in some ways like it awards them with an unfair advantage.

    Of course it can be argued that the lesser team had their chances earlier in the game to prevent this late game dilemma, and this no doubt would be an accurate assessment, but strategy or not, for me, it just doesn't make for interesting basketball when the game seems to have been decided even when you have a full period still left to play.

    On the flip side of this, of course stall ball can also benefit a lesser team if they decide to execute it for the entirely of a game in an attempt to slow down the stronger team with the hopes of keeping within striking distance, and in many cases it's their only chance at possibly winning the game.

    I'm divided because in some instances I like the availability of the stall ball strategy, while in others I don't particularly care for it.

    In general the stall ball strategy hasn't seemed like such an issue in most HS games that I've seen in my lifetime, however its late game presence has reared its ugly head more than I care to count.

    Obviously it's not all about me and what I, or other fans want, and it's about how a team most effectively can come out victorious in a contest by using whatever perfectly acceptable strategies they have available to them within the confines of the game as it is without a shot clock. Both teams entering a contest equally share the same rules, so I'm not too sure a shot clock matters one way or another.

    I see the pros and the cons of having a shot clock, but the thing that stands out to me most about the benefit of having one would be that it would help to make each contest a real contest for the entirety of the the amount of time there is on the game clock, and possibly keep the game exciting and in doubt deeper into its minutes rather than allowing a team to pull out of its bag of tricks the stall ball option that too early in a game seems to decide the outcome, and turns it too soon into a snooze fest.

    Of course a shot clock also could cause a snooze fest when you have a strong team get up early and a lesser team having no option to slow the game down, making the outcome way to obvious too early in the game as well.

    I don't know.

    An argument can be made for having a shot clock, and a fairly equal argument could be made for not, and either way it's hard to say that anyone is wrong. There are benefits to both sides, and either way none will offer a perfect solution, nor satisfy all.

    With or without, both teams enter a contest under the same rules and typically the more talented team will prevail.

  7. #52
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    I like high school basketball the way it is, but the more and more I hear, read and see college coaches talk about it, the greater the chance of state associations possibly voting it in.

  8. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDeuce View Post
    Money will always be the issue and reason there aren't shot clocks.
    End of story. Next please.

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    The thread prior to this one in the forum list schools who have never made it to the Sweet 16. The majority of the schools are class A schools. A shot clock would remove the chance for most if not all class a schools to compete at the district regional and state level. Remember Carlisle County versus Henry Clay 1983.

  10. #55
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    Stall ball is garbage to me. Being patient and looking for a good shot when you're up is one thing, but two guards playing keep away is not basketball. The kids learn nothing from it, and it lets coaches off the hook on teaching the players how to maintain a lead in the closing minutes.

    30-40 seconds is more than enough time to go through some options before the best player makes something happen.

    If I hit the Powerball, I'll provide the clocks to each school and they shall be called "Snot Clocks" and play-by-play guys will say things like "The Drippen is tickin" as the clock approaches zero.

  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDeuce View Post
    If schools were serious about having consistent operators, it could be done. It's really not that hard. You can't tell me a school that has a basketball program can't find two people, between parents, coaches, players, and students to run the clock.
    Consistently, for all 3 levels (Freshman, JV, V)...yes, it can and is difficult, in particular for small schools, to have a consistent operator that can fully operate a clock in game situations.

  12. #57

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    I agree to having it on the big stage, that being state tourny, mainly because I know teams that ran victim to others playing "keep away" and not getting another shot, yes you foul, but it's every time up the floor "keep away time". I think 35 would be good at Rupp & Diddle/NKU because it teaches these young kids to not play around, gotta get them ready for college ball if they plan on going to college for ball.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LoganDMC View Post
    I agree to having it on the big stage, that being state tourny, mainly because I know teams that ran victim to others playing "keep away" and not getting another shot, yes you foul, but it's every time up the floor "keep away time". I think 35 would be good at Rupp & Diddle/NKU because it teaches these young kids to not play around, gotta get them ready for college ball if they plan on going to college for ball.
    So, you play the game one way the whole year, and then COMPLETELY change the way it's played in the state tournament? Count me as not a fan of that, at all.

    That's akin to playing the state football finals and telling the defense they can no longer rush the qb for that game. Changes things just a touch.

  14. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by BirdBrain View Post
    Consistently, for all 3 levels (Freshman, JV, V)...yes, it can and is difficult, in particular for small schools, to have a consistent operator that can fully operate a clock in game situations.
    Agree

  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smallhoops View Post
    There's a pretty good article on this topic on the National Federation of State High School Associations website (NFHS) from a year ago. There are multiple quotes form Commissioner Tackett, which suggest that a shot clock will not be implemented in Kentucky any time soon.
    By the way, it appears that there are 7 states that use a shot clock for boys high school basketball: California, Massachusetts, New York, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota and Washington.
    It would be interesting to compair their average game scores to the states without shot clocks.

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