2A Classic set to launch in 2019

Page 5 of A tournament for schools to large for the All-A Classic yet under 1,000 in enrollment is in the works for 2019. The 2A Classic could see 66 schools inc... 94 comments | 7938 Views | Go to page 1 →

  1. #61

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    Classification doesn't work for Kentucky because we don't have enough schools. We have 270 that compete in boys basketball. Ohio has 4 classifications that average out to 200 schools per class. If Kentucky did something like this, it would be more of a rural and urban/suburban classification than anything. Over 50% of the schools in the top class (footballs classes 4, 5, and 6) would come from Northern Kentucky, Louisville, Lexington, and the 4th Region. Setting up districts for this would be a nightmare travel wise. This would costs school more money (I know it works in football but you have way less games). Classes in Kentucky is a bad idea.
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  2. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by HSBballfan24 View Post
    Classification doesn't work for Kentucky because we don't have enough schools. We have 270 that compete in boys basketball. Ohio has 4 classifications that average out to 200 schools per class. If Kentucky did something like this, it would be more of a rural and urban/suburban classification than anything. Over 50% of the schools in the top class (footballs classes 4, 5, and 6) would come from Northern Kentucky, Louisville, Lexington, and the 4th Region. Setting up districts for this would be a nightmare travel wise. This would costs school more money (I know it works in football but you have way less games). Classes in Kentucky is a bad idea.
    THIS!! I’ve never thought how many less schools we have.

  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by Just Hangin Around View Post
    How about the family that can afford to go to one tournament out of town but not a second one. I'm betting it has a direct correlation on attendance drop at the Sweet 16.
    I can't tell if you're joking?

  4. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by HSBballfan24 View Post
    Classification doesn't work for Kentucky because we don't have enough schools. We have 270 that compete in boys basketball. Ohio has 4 classifications that average out to 200 schools per class. If Kentucky did something like this, it would be more of a rural and urban/suburban classification than anything. Over 50% of the schools in the top class (footballs classes 4, 5, and 6) would come from Northern Kentucky, Louisville, Lexington, and the 4th Region. Setting up districts for this would be a nightmare travel wise. This would costs school more money (I know it works in football but you have way less games). Classes in Kentucky is a bad idea.
    Well aside from district play, you can pretty much play whoever you want. I doubt schedules would have to change all that much.

  5. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smokey Joe View Post
    I see where you are coming from now. I don't know why you are going with the all caps about THE SWEET SIXTEEN I was not trying to get under your skin and cause you to yell at me, at least my kids tell me that when I use all caps.
    Taken from story in Lexington Herald Leader by Mark Story

    Sixty nine years ago, Cliff Hagan led his Owensboro Red Devils to win the 1949 Sweet 16 State Championship. Hagan would also become a player on teams that won the 1951 NCAA Championship and a 1958 NBA Championship and inducted as a player into the 1978 Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.
    After his epic hoops career, to this day, the 86 year old Hagan says his greatest basketball thrill was leading Owensboro to that 1949 Kentucky Sweet 16 basketball championship.
    Just thought this might give you another viewpoint on why keeping the Sweet 16 the way it is and why it means so much to so many to keep it that way.

  6. #66
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    If itís a mid-season tournament it wonít have any more effect on the Sweet 16 than what the All A has had in the past, which is zero.

    The Sweet 16 will still be the Big Daddy on the block for all Kentucky high schools.

  7. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sportsaholic Mamaw View Post
    Taken from story in Lexington Herald Leader by Mark Story

    Sixty nine years ago, Cliff Hagan led his Owensboro Red Devils to win the 1949 Sweet 16 State Championship. Hagan would also become a player on teams that won the 1951 NCAA Championship and a 1958 NBA Championship and inducted as a player into the 1978 Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.
    After his epic hoops career, to this day, the 86 year old Hagan says his greatest basketball thrill was leading Owensboro to that 1949 Kentucky Sweet 16 basketball championship.
    Just thought this might give you another viewpoint on why keeping the Sweet 16 the way it is and why it means so much to so many to keep it that way.
    Are you saying that others from states where basketball is classed wouldn't answer the same question the same way?? Do you think KY football players, and track/cross country athletes don't value their state titles because there are multiple classes?

    I get it. It's a great story once every couple decades when a small team makes a nice run. But the landscape of High School sports has changed dramatically over the last few decades. There is a gap between small and large schools, and it continues to get wider. Yes there are exceptions on both sides, and examples of big schools that struggle. I'll freely admit being a non native Kentuckian, I don't share the same connection to the Sweet 16. But that also gives me the perspective of having seen it done in other states (including one of the other states that doesn't class..although in Delaware, with only 70 basketball playing schools, there's little reason to class). Tradition doesn't always mean something is the best or right way to do it.

  8. #68

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    There are 125 All A schools, and only 66 in the proposed 2A. There is really no point to this tournament. The All A was created to give exposure to small schools who could not be successful against bigger schools.

    In the 10th Region, the schools would be: Scott, Harrison, Pendleton, Mason, Bourbon. Do these schools not already have the talent and numbers to be region contenders?

    I think this idea will fail, only 40/66 schools are on board with this.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sportsaholic Mamaw View Post
    Taken from story in Lexington Herald Leader by Mark Story

    Sixty nine years ago, Cliff Hagan led his Owensboro Red Devils to win the 1949 Sweet 16 State Championship. Hagan would also become a player on teams that won the 1951 NCAA Championship and a 1958 NBA Championship and inducted as a player into the 1978 Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.
    After his epic hoops career, to this day, the 86 year old Hagan says his greatest basketball thrill was leading Owensboro to that 1949 Kentucky Sweet 16 basketball championship.
    Just thought this might give you another viewpoint on why keeping the Sweet 16 the way it is and why it means so much to so many to keep it that way.
    This is a great story and one that I heard before. I do not want to see the the Sweet Sixteen gone from HS bball an I don't think with the addition of a 2A state tournament we will see it change for a long time if ever. Just my thoughts.

  10. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by rjs4470 View Post
    Are you saying that others from states where basketball is classed wouldn't answer the same question the same way?? Do you think KY football players, and track/cross country athletes don't value their state titles because there are multiple classes?

    I get it. It's a great story once every couple decades when a small team makes a nice run. But the landscape of High School sports has changed dramatically over the last few decades. There is a gap between small and large schools, and it continues to get wider. Yes there are exceptions on both sides, and examples of big schools that struggle. I'll freely admit being a non native Kentuckian, I don't share the same connection to the Sweet 16. But that also gives me the perspective of having seen it done in other states (including one of the other states that doesn't class..although in Delaware, with only 70 basketball playing schools, there's little reason to class). Tradition doesn't always mean something is the best or right way to do it.
    But in this case, it very much is the best and right way in regards to basketball. #leaveitalone

  11. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by camelman View Post
    But in this case, it very much is the best and right way in regards to basketball. #leaveitalone
    I understand your opinion. I just don’t happen to agree with it :-).

  12. #72

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    You get a trophy! You get a trophy! You get a trophy too!

  13. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by rjs4470 View Post
    I understand your opinion. I just don’t happen to agree with it :-).
    No problem. It will never go to classes in baketball.

  14. #74

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    Quote Originally Posted by ESPNdeux View Post
    Well... what else do you suppose we should base it on?
    I have some family in Clarksville, Tennessee that play basketball and football. Tennessee uses 6 classes for public school football and only 3 for public school basketball. I am sure that is the norm in other states as well. My cousin's boys play 5A football and 3A basketball at their school.

  15. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by rjs4470 View Post
    I'll freely admit being a non native Kentuckian, I don't share the same connection to the Sweet 16. Tradition doesn't always mean something is the best or right way to do it.
    I'm not demeaning the award winning efforts of any athlete. I just couldn't care less about how other states run their programs. I am saying that the way it has been done in Kentucky, is the very reason we have the Sweet 16. A one of a kind experience. From listening to the Sweet 16 on the only radio a family owned or driving the car in the direction of the radio station broadcasting the games, so we could hear the games. Watching it for the first time, on television on Ch. 19 out of Newport,Kentucky . Making the trip to Freedom Hall to see it live, sacrificing spring break for love of the game. Then watching it the first time in Rupp Arena. Many of these young men, playing in Freedom Hall or Rupp Arena, had never played in a gym that held more than a couple hundred fans. It was THE pinnacle of basketball and to win it all was something an athlete dreamed about growing up. From their very first shot made thru a woven wood basket nailed on the side of their barn or corncrib. As you said you're not a native Kentuckian, so you didn't live, sleep and eat basketball. Lots of small schools couldn't field or afford a football team. But they could put a basketball team on the floor. THE SWEET 16 is the ultimate TRADITION and that's what you don't feel. It is the way we do tradition in Kentucky, it Is the right way and ALWAYS should be. I hope.

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