Youth Football Team Kneels for National Anthem

Page 2 of Hard to see these kids protesting, I bet most can't even tie their shoes yet or buckle their own chinstrap. I am sure they truly understand what they a... 127 comments | 3190 Views | Go to page 1 →

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bengal Maniac View Post
    Using children that likely have no idea on the issue (any issue, not just this) is wrong in my opinion. It is not the issue, it is the use of kids. I have no problem if an adult doesn't stand. At least they understand there could be consequences. Children do not.
    I wouldn't go are far as saying that my Dad was a racist, but I do recall at a very young age calling him out while in the car with him and my Mom when he made a not so nice comment about a random person of color on the street.

    I also recall him getting real quiet and looking rather embarrassed when I did, and my Mom also mumbling something to him under her breath related to me not being wrong about it.

    Though I don't recall exactly how old I was, I'm sure that I was at least under the age of 10 at the time.
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  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by B-Ball-fan View Post
    I would have understood this when I was 8, and I don't think that I was so unique or advanced for my age.
    I would have just done what my dad said whether I understaood or not and I may have known it was different than most people, but I would not have understood the total issue at the age of 8.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bengal Maniac View Post
    I would have just done what my dad said whether I understaood or not and I may have known it was different than most people, but I would not have understood the total issue at the age of 8.
    I can respect this, as only you would know how you'd be at 8.

    I was the youngest of 6 so I had various topics and stimulus all around me from my older siblings and parents all the time.

    I recall listening in on my oldest sister and my parents having philosophical and theological conversations where my sister who is 11 years older than me was beginning to question her faith and being raised Catholic, or my other sister who was prego pre-maritally at 18, or my teen brother who was beginning to take interest in having beers with his friends.

    Not much got past me even while sometimes it was all done in whispers. I learned early to be keen to just about everything that was going on in the family whether it was intended for my ears or not.

    In doing so, I was early on forming perceptions and opinions about what I thought about it all.

    Believe it or not, and this is no reflection on my parents, I was 8 the first time I got drunk. It was at my oldest sister's wedding where I kept sneaking drinks when no one was looking. My parents were walking around greeting relatives with my sister and her husband and had no idea what I was up to, or even thought that it was a concern until they saw me staggering around the dance floor. Sorta ruined anymore fun for them, as now they had to deal with their drunk 8 year old son, and the embarrassment of that.

  4. #19

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    The coach should have at least had them take their helmets off. He had a teachable moment there about respect.

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    I can say this with truth, if my kid followed the lead of the other kids I would have been screaming at him to stand up and yes he would have heard me. He will not be a follower of wrong kids or adults as long as I can help it.
    It would have been a teachable moment for him.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountain ref View Post
    I can say this with truth, if my kid followed the lead of the other kids I would have been screaming at him to stand up and yes he would have heard me. He will not be a follower of wrong kids or adults as long as I can help it.
    It would have been a teachable moment for him.
    I can say this with truth. Someone yelling at someone else to stand up during the Anthem is more disrespectful and disruptive than someone who quietly kneels. As someone who takes the anthem with reverence, someone quietly kneeling does not impede on my moment, but someone yelling (regardless of what you are yelling) certainly does.

  7. #22
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    If it was one of my kids, I would have just have had them read this.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bengal Maniac View Post
    Using children that likely have no idea on the issue (any issue, not just this) is wrong in my opinion. It is not the issue, it is the use of kids. I have no problem if an adult doesn't stand. At least they understand there could be consequences. Children do not.
    Absolutely this. No eight year old has the ability to comprehend and understand this stuff.

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  11. #26
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    There are too any things in today's society that are wrong. Be it morally, ethically, religiously or just not right. Everyone has become to soft or too tolerant. Trying to find reasons or justifications for it does not make it right.
    This is one of them.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by True blue (and gold) View Post
    I can say this with truth. Someone yelling at someone else to stand up during the Anthem is more disrespectful and disruptive than someone who quietly kneels. As someone who takes the anthem with reverence, someone quietly kneeling does not impede on my moment, but someone yelling (regardless of what you are yelling) certainly does.
    This times eleventy billion.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by TAC View Post
    There are too any things in today's society that are wrong. Be it morally, ethically, religiously or just not right. Everyone has become to soft or too tolerant. Trying to find reasons or justifications for it does not make it right.
    This is one of them.
    What might be an acceptable or effective way for people of the black community to express what they consider to be very real concerns regarding their dissatisfaction with the racial injustices that they experience in their everyday lives, and/or their fears that they have regarding how they, or their friends and family might be unfairly treated because of the color of their skin?

    Many whites consider the BLM movement and their demonstrations to be loud, threatening, and civilly disruptive, and only stand to widen the divide of the races, and while very possibly an unintended result, black folks are scrambling, and understandably so, to find some or any way to let their voices and concerns be heard.

    Is it possible that they might have a legitimate gripe or concern?

    Is it possible that if people don't want to hear or face these concerns, that this only magnifies the need that these concerns be voiced and heard?

    So now some blacks are taking a silent approach during the National Anthem that speaks louder than words, and it's still not good enough, or by many considered to be disrespectful.

    With all of this in mind, I'll pose the question again....

    What might be an acceptable or effective way for people of the black community to express what they consider to be very real concerns regarding their dissatisfaction with the racial injustices that they experience in their everyday lives, and/or their fears that they have regarding how they, or their friends and family might be unfairly treated because of the color of their skin?

  14. #29
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    Okay, I'm going to ask the first question that automatically popped into my mind upon reading this. (And quite frankly, I'm surprised no one else has asked this...so, maybe I'm totally in the dark.)

    They play the national anthem before 8-year old football games?!?!?

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by B-Ball-fan View Post
    What might be an acceptable or effective way for people of the black community to express what they consider to be very real concerns regarding their dissatisfaction with the racial injustices that they experience in their everyday lives, and/or their fears that they have regarding how they, or their friends and family might be unfairly treated because of the color of their skin?

    Many whites consider the BLM movement and their demonstrations to be loud, threatening, and civilly disruptive, and only stand to widen the divide of the races, and while very possibly an unintended result, black folks are scrambling, and understandably so, to find some or any way to let their voices and concerns be heard.

    Is it possible that they might have a legitimate gripe or concern?

    Is it possible that if people don't want to hear or face these concerns, that this only magnifies the need that these concerns be voiced and heard?

    So now some blacks are taking a silent approach during the National Anthem that speaks louder than words, and it's still not good enough, or by many considered to be disrespectful.

    With all of this in mind, I'll pose the question again....

    What might be an acceptable or effective way for people of the black community to express what they consider to be very real concerns regarding their dissatisfaction with the racial injustices that they experience in their everyday lives, and/or their fears that they have regarding how they, or their friends and family might be unfairly treated because of the color of their skin?
    Not commit violent crimes and domestic terrorism while trying to make their point.

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