Why has the KHSAA not done this?

Page 2 of ...and maybe it has, but I don't know about it. And if it has someone please enlighten me. Why doesnt the KHSAA monitor (or count) the number of studen... 43 comments | 1921 Views | Go to page 1 →

  1. #16

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    Parents who send their kids to public schools through the eighth grade have generally paid taxes to support those public schools. When they opt to send their kids to private high schools, they continue to pay taxes and support those same public schools unless they move into another public school district, in which case they pay taxes to support that school system.

    In effect, public schools have more money on which to operate on (on a per student basis) than they have if a kid enrolls in a public high school. I don't understand why this is a problem. It is obvious that if a family's funds are tight, why they might prefer sending their kids to a private school in high school.

    I am sure that many people make the decision because of the discipline and religious instruction offered by the private schools. Parents of teenagers can use all the help that they can get, and some public schools just fail miserably in the area of discipline.

    I am amazed at these kind of arguments. Kids who make the switch from public to private schools as they enter high school have not taken advantage of any benefits in earlier grades to which they were not rightfully entitled. As Henry said

    Quote Originally Posted by Originally posted by Henry521
    Ask the question why they are transferring after the middle school years. If it is for athletic reasons or academic, then the school they leave better get their act together and figure out why students are leaving and work harder to fix the problem so they will stay.
    Public schools who are losing large numbers of students and athletes need to look inward and ask what they can do to convince parents that they offer a better educational value.
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  2. #17
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    If a family's funds are "tight" why would they choose a school requiring tuition over a free school? Not sure I follow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hardball
    If a family's funds are "tight" why would they choose a school requiring tuition over a free school? Not sure I follow.

    That's been answered time and time again, and has not one thing to do with athletics.

  4. #19
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    But this thread is about athletics.

  5. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by hardball
    But this thread is about athletics.

    And the reason people choose to pay tuition, despite their financial hardships has nothing to do with athletics. I know of no one who's paid for tuition to simply allow their kid to play football.

  6. #21
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    That's fine, but the entire context of the discussion centers on "athletes" changing from public to private and vice versa. The kids that choose to attend private school for the educational benefits and receive financial aid aren't who the KHSAA or anyone on BGP are referring to.

    But, since we are discussing things, do you think a high percentage of athletes from different feeder programs should throw up a red flag to the KHSAA? It's not private school athletics the publics schools are upset with...its the individual programs within the private schools. But it's the setup of the private schools that allow this "recruiting" to take place.

    And yes, I know, Louisville has open enrollment.

  7. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by hardball
    But this thread is about athletics.

    But if the thread is soley about athleteics then you are essentially saying to private school supporters that the many other reasons they send their children to private schools are irrelevant. In essence the only reason anyone would leave a public school is because of sports, at least that is how it looks here. The difference between perception and reality is that perception is stronger, that much is obvious in our constant roundabouts with those who believe we give full scholarships and/or athletic scholarships. Concordantly it is the same in this instance just slightly modified.

    I have a student, a freshman, at OCHS who's brother went to Trinity. Both brothers are exceptional soccer players, and yet I once asked the younger of the two brothers why his older brother went to Trinity and he did not. He told me with a straight face that it was to straighten his older brother out, which he said worked quite well.

    There are many instances in which parents choose private schools for any number of reasons, athletic and academic concerns aside. Some do it for prestige, others do it for discipline, I can go on and on.... The point here however is that by popping out one of the legs of the table of private education for the sake of discussion inherently puts the private school supporters at a disadvantage if we are not allowed to use our full faculties in order to respond.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardball
    But this thread is about athletics.
    Strictly speaking, almost this entire website is about athletics and athletics is its raison d'Ítre.

    However, people send their kids to private schools for reasons which frequently have nothing to do with athletics -- or religion, for that matter.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardball
    ...and maybe it has, but I don't know about it. And if it has someone please enlighten me.

    Why doesnt the KHSAA monitor (or count) the number of student athletes at major private schools who compete at the varsity level and determine if these same students attended public or private schools at the elementary or middle school level?

    I'm sure this will draw the ire of several, but to me, when a student athlete transfers to/enrolls in a private school as a 9th, 8th or 7th grader, something isn't right. After all, if public school education is good enough for a child's formative years, how does that same child or the child's parents make the decision that suddenly it isn't?

    And yes, I know that none of this explicitly means that any middle schooler that enrolls in private schooling has been recruited. But if a private school's varsity basketball or football roster is comprised of a high percentage of kids that attended a different middle school system, should that not raise some eyebrows?

    Anywho, if anyone knows of a study such as this that has been conducted, I'd love to hear it or read it. Because if only a handfull of LexCath's (or T's, or X's) varsity athletes came from different middle schools, why is there an argument at all?

    But on the flipside, if a huge chunk of these schools' varsity athletes competed at different middle schools, then there is definately a problem that needs to be addressed.
    You have never been in a Jeff Co public School I guess.

  10. #25
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    A lot of problems could be corrected before it happens if the KHSAA would begin monitoring below the high school level. Coaches are dipping down and openly recruiting at the middle school level because currently there is nothing in place to deter this.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nets
    A lot of problems could be corrected before it happens if the KHSAA would begin monitoring below the high school level. Coaches are dipping down and openly recruiting at the middle school level because currently there is nothing in place to deter this.
    I love the way everybody proposes this without trying to find a way to pay for it.

  12. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nets
    A lot of problems could be corrected before it happens if the KHSAA would begin monitoring below the high school level. Coaches are dipping down and openly recruiting at the middle school level because currently there is nothing in place to deter this.
    No offense Nets, but I respectfully disagree.

    IMO the KHSAA has enough power and enough regulations on the books already that need enforcing. Their plate is full enough just keeping tabs on grades 9 - 12.

    I don't understand why parents and kids shouldn't have the freedom to decide the school they want to attend at any time.

    I think a one-time no-penalty transfer anytime during grades 9-12 is a better option. It gives low and middle income parents and kids the opportunity to get out of a bad situation without the expense and trouble of a change of residence.

    The only other alternative is to then tie up 5th and 6th graders as Prop 3 attempts to do. Next will be 1st through 12th graders... kindergarten and pre-schoolers, and before you know it, school districts will be taking options on embryos.

    This is ridiculous in America.

    Stop recruiting by punishing those who break the existing rules, but let people choose what is best for their children, right or wrong.

  13. #28
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    Fastbreak,

    You are a valued friend and always will be, however, if you think for 1 minute that coaches in VARIOUS sports do not go to or send messages to other schools to student/athletes below grade 9, then you are fooling yourself. I believe Tennessee Sports and Activities Association currently have standards that govern this level. If they can, then why not the KHSAA?? I do not, however, know the specifics of how they govern, what they do, or deter recruitment if any, but at least there is some jurisdiction at the middle school level.

    It is a problem...maybe not so much in our area Fastbreak, but in other areas of the state it is becoming a common practice.

  14. #29

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    Dittoes to you Nets.

    I do not deny that this happens. In fact I know it happens. I guess the difference we have is I donít see why this should be of any concern to the KHSAA. I think kids and parents should have the choice of which schools they will attend. Whether their reasons are for academics, athletics, arts, social environment, etc. shouldnít matter. It is different for every child and who better than that childís parents to determine what is best.

    I will grant you that YES, there will be many parents who make poor decisions. In all honesty, some make poor decisions to have kids in the first place. But, that should not be an excuse to limit wise and loving parents from making intelligent choices for each of their children.

    The upside as I see it is a great community like West Liberty, with a quality school like Morgan County High, and an outstanding coach like Matthew Perry who will combine to make a positive investment in the young men in their system. A lot of the kids I see as standouts in grade school donít even play in high school. Hopefully, they will find other channels to apply their God given talents. Correspondingly, there are many kids that donít blossom until middle school. These kidsí families may not have previously known the full potential of their children, and they should have an opportunity before they are locked into a high school to make the choice that is best for them.

    It may tick some folks off, but I have to believe that Coach Perry and Morgan County would be a wise choice for budding prospects in that area.

    I can understand your frustration with coaches that blatantly recruit, especially for those with crummy schools and athletic programs. But I am puzzled why this would be a problem for anyone with an outstanding community, school and coach.

    Why is giving parents a choice a bad thing?

  15. #30

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    What happens then if all kids are given a choice and say for example they all want to go to a select few schools? That leaves other school numbers dropping big time. Do you shut down that school? what do you do? Many schools in Louisville had huge population drops when open enrollment was started. Many of them were on the verge of closing. Is that a good thing?

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