What did the recent KY Teacher Pension Protest in Frankfort accomplish?

Page 13 of I think it accomplished plenty for the other side meaning it let the Teachers vent, enjoy spring break, and now get back to work, but I have no idea wh... 318 comments | 9735 Views | Go to page 1 →

  1. #181

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    So apparently there is a second round happening Friday? I see several districts have canceled school Friday.
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  2. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by plantmanky View Post
    So apparently there is a second round happening Friday? I see several districts have canceled school Friday.
    Seems this one is to influence the budget vote. I saw a few districts that were in danger of insolvency under the budget the gov. proposed cancelled. Fighting for their lives.

  3. #183

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    Quote Originally Posted by barrel View Post
    What companies require you to contribute with no option to unenroll?
    The one with MY name on the door.

  4. #184

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    Quote Originally Posted by barrel View Post
    Where do you get the stats to say a vast majority do not? I might be reading your statement wrong. I take your statement to mean a vast majority of people don’t call in sick unless they truly are sick? So a massive flu or some other pandemic hits every year the day after the Super Bowl? During March Madness? A number of companies have just went to PTO so there is no distinction between sick leave and vacation time. If PTO time can not be carried forward I believe you would see an increase of days taken as it gets closer to use or lose time. In the different jobs I have been apart of that has been the trend. If one cannot carry sick leave forward then yes people are more than likely will use those days. Feeling a little under the weather? Sure stay home.

    Districts encouraged teachers not to use sick days for numerous reasons. Also it is a royal pain to be sick as a teacher due to prep work, falling behind and cleaning up the mess when they return.
    Your last paragraph is slightly alarming. Are substitute teachers THAT bad, to create so much catch up work for you when you return?

  5. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hellcats View Post
    Seems this one is to influence the budget vote. I saw a few districts that were in danger of insolvency under the budget the gov. proposed cancelled. Fighting for their lives.
    Correct. I'm told several legislators have been invited to join the teachers, but it seems they will be in conference then session to see if they can override Bevin's veto.

  6. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sportsaholic Mamaw View Post
    Your last paragraph is slightly alarming. Are substitute teachers THAT bad, to create so much catch up work for you when you return?
    It's been mentioned there's a shortage of them, so that means many school districts are likely picking the bottom of the barrel.

    And even if the sub is a good one — say a longtime retired educator or even somebody young who has a grounding in a particular study area while in college — they'll only be as good as what kind of preparation the teacher can provide them on what to do next within the course of their lesson plan. These folks are coming in cold, after all.

  7. #187

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Schue View Post
    It's been mentioned there's a shortage of them, so that means many school districts are likely picking the bottom of the barrel.

    And even if the sub is a good one — say a longtime retired educator or even somebody young who has a grounding in a particular study area while in college — they'll only be as good as what kind of preparation the teacher can provide them on what to do next within the course of their lesson plan. These folks are coming in cold, after all.
    True, substitute teachers are coming in cold, but aren't lesson plans for a number of classes posted ahead of time on the teacher's computer? Not the same site used by students for homework assignments.

  8. #188

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    While watching coverage of teacher's protest on Channel 27 Lexington, there were a number of school buses parked in the Capitol lot. Were they carrying students to also protest, since they were already out of school?

  9. #189
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sportsaholic Mamaw View Post
    Your last paragraph is slightly alarming. Are substitute teachers THAT bad, to create so much catch up work for you when you return?
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Schue View Post
    It's been mentioned there's a shortage of them, so that means many school districts are likely picking the bottom of the barrel.

    And even if the sub is a good one — say a longtime retired educator or even somebody young who has a grounding in a particular study area while in college — they'll only be as good as what kind of preparation the teacher can provide them on what to do next within the course of their lesson plan. These folks are coming in cold, after all.
    Over the past 5-6 years I’ve seen fewer and fewer retired teachers return to sub. One reason may be is sub pay in our district hasn’t changed since I subbed here nearly 20 years ago. More alarmingly there are even fewer college age students subbing. The sub rolls used to be full of college kids getting 60 hrs and coming back home to squeeze in a few sub days on days off: not happening anymore.

    The people that are subbing seem to be people that did not major in education and are using subbing as a second job-type opportunity. Unfortunately not the quality of a veteran retired teacher and they do not offer the potential a future educator can bring to the school.

    Bottom line is this: the best sub is only going to get about 75% out of the class. Sadly most of the time it’s more like 40%.

  10. #190
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hellcats View Post
    Seems this one is to influence the budget vote. I saw a few districts that were in danger of insolvency under the budget the gov. proposed cancelled. Fighting for their lives.
    This was my understanding. I believe Garrard County and Mercer County are two public schools under the gun that would be affected in a major way if Bevin’s proposed cuts are passed.

  11. #191
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    I saw the state Fraternal Order of Police joined state educators on the AG's suit to stop the pension reform.

    For those familiar with the FOP, is that a KEA-type organization that is only voluntarily joined? Do many officers participate if so?

  12. #192
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sportsaholic Mamaw View Post
    Your last paragraph is slightly alarming. Are substitute teachers THAT bad, to create so much catch up work for you when you return?
    Depending on the level and subject a substitute might not be able to do the work. You’d be surprised how many adults have a hard time with math on the algebra level or above. How well do most people know history, music, art, chemistry, or literature? The subject can be a barrier and so can the developmental level of the students. Some people won’t sub on certain levels. Then take into account your sub pool for a Boone County would be very different to from the sub pool in say a much more rural county.

    As far as lesson plans go I’m not aware of lesson plans being available to subs through a schools website. Maybe some school districts do this but most work off of sub folders. Lesson plans are typically not step by step instructions either. Lesson plans vary largely from district to district also.

  13. #193

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    Quote Originally Posted by barrel View Post
    Depending on the level and subject a substitute might not be able to do the work. You’d be surprised how many adults have a hard time with math on the algebra level or above. How well do most people know history, music, art, chemistry, or literature? The subject can be a barrier and so can the developmental level of the students. Some people won’t sub on certain levels. Then take into account your sub pool for a Boone County would be very different to from the sub pool in say a much more rural county.

    As far as lesson plans go I’m not aware of lesson plans being available to subs through a schools website. Maybe some school districts do this but most work off of sub folders. Lesson plans are typically not step by step instructions either. Lesson plans vary largely from district to district also.
    Very educational because I did not realize how much or LITTLE was required to be a sub. How can someone, not educated for the teaching profession, be a sub if they have none of the required elements like psychology to deal with students? How much are subs paid per day, nothing firm, just a guess? And yes, my math skills are good enough to figure cubic inches in an engine for Papaw. How many college hours are required to sub? Just wondering since I know Kentucky requires a Master's Degree to remain in teaching. Definitely not asking for myself. I would not have the patience to deal with today's students.
    With the technology of today, I thought lesson plans or a syllabus were prepared ahead and available on the school computer site for teachers. Especially for AP classes. Like I said this thread has been very educational as to how schools are operating.

  14. #194

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    A couple years back a friend of mine subbed and he made about $80 per day I believe.

  15. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sportsaholic Mamaw View Post
    Very educational because I did not realize how much or LITTLE was required to be a sub. How can someone, not educated for the teaching profession, be a sub if they have none of the required elements like psychology to deal with students? How much are subs paid per day, nothing firm, just a guess? And yes, my math skills are good enough to figure cubic inches in an engine for Papaw. How many college hours are required to sub? Just wondering since I know Kentucky requires a Master's Degree to remain in teaching. Definitely not asking for myself. I would not have the patience to deal with today's students.
    With the technology of today, I thought lesson plans or a syllabus were prepared ahead and available on the school computer site for teachers. Especially for AP classes. Like I said this thread has been very educational as to how schools are operating.
    Subs have to have 60 hours of college credit. Some schools require a training session. TBH, I think that may be a requirement that is often skirted out of convenience.

    My district starts at $60 a day and goes up to $100.

    I would expect those requirements to go down.

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