What are the real (and unavoidable) private school advantages?

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    What are the real (and unavoidable) private school advantages?

    I would like to discuss what the real (and unavoidable) advantages are for private schools? However, this thread is not exactly what you think, for example, accepting students from large geographical areas would NOT be a real (and unavoidable) advantage because any school can choose an open enrollment policy.

    What are the real (and unavoidable) private school advantages?
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    Quote Originally Posted by theguru
    I would like to discuss what the real (and unavoidable) advantages are for private schools? However, this thread is not exactly what you think, for example, accepting students from large geographical areas would NOT be a real (and unavoidable) advantage because any school can choose an open enrollment policy.

    What are the real (and unavoidable) private school advantages?

    In regards to athletics only?

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    Quote Originally Posted by theguru
    I would like to discuss what the real (and unavoidable) advantages are for private schools? However, this thread is not exactly what you think, for example, accepting students from large geographical areas would NOT be a real (and unavoidable) advantage because any school can choose an open enrollment policy.

    What are the real (and unavoidable) private school advantages?
    All Boy Schools.


    (Even though I would like Trinity and the other privates to stay and play so Lexington Catholic will one day be knocked off their high horse.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by cshs81
    In regards to athletics only?
    So we can focus, sure, for athletics only.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Golfer
    All Boy Schools.

    How is that a benefit athletically?

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Golfer
    All Boy Schools.
    Ok, why?

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    Quote Originally Posted by theguru
    Ok, why?
    First of all it doubles your numbers for football which helps but it isn't the end all be all.

    Dunbar for example somewhere I know very well. The football field must be divided into ceratin times for everyone. Girls Soccer gets the same amount of time as Football.(Boys Soccer as well). Dunbar football only gets half the field on a daily basis. Dunbar has turf and has to go by title 9. I don't think an all boy schools will have that problem.

    Girls Volley Ball must have the same amount of time as boys basketball.

    Space can be blamed on the administration I guess but taking girls sports completely out of the mix will NO DOUBT help out the boys programs.


    Money must be split up through out the Athletic program from other sports. The more money making sports must help out other programs that do not make as much money. Take Trinity's gates and split it up with Girls Basketball, Volleyball, Soccer, Golf and other girls sports and their great wallets will decrease.

    Girls have the right to money and time as well. This is a HUGE ADVANTAGE, all boy schools have.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Golfer
    First of all it doubles your numbers for football which helps but it isn't the end all be all.

    Dunbar for example somewhere I know very well. The football field must be divided into ceratin times for everyone. Girls Soccer gets the same amount of time as Football.(Boys Soccer as well). Dunbar football only gets half the field on a daily basis. Dunbar has turf and has to go by title 9. I don't think an all boy schools will have that problem.

    Girls Volley Ball must have the same amount of time as boys basketball.

    Space can be blamed on the administration I guess but taking girls sports completely out of the mix will NO DOUBT help out the boys programs.


    Money must be split up through out the Athletic program from other sports. The more money making sports must help out other programs that do not make as much money. Take Trinity's gates and split it up with Girls Basketball, Volleyball, Soccer, Golf and other girls sports and their great wallets will decrease.

    Girls have the right to money and time as well. This is a HUGE ADVANTAGE, all boy schools have.

    I'll buy much of the above. Less competition for facilities is definitely an advantage.

    However, in your example, Dunbar's footbal team still has full practices , correct? If so, how is that a disadvantage?

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Golfer
    First of all it doubles your numbers for football which helps but it isn't the end all be all.

    .
    I don't see how this is an advantage. Essentially, ALL schools are based on the number of boys in the school, correct? No, they don't actually count the boys but they make an assumption that approximately half are boys. THus, CCH, with 480 boys plays schools with approximately 800 to 1000 kids. That seems fair.

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    I knew something wasn't right with private schools the day I was in Louisville at the mall and saw a big advertisement for Trinity High School, right beside some jewelry ads and a mall directory. As a private school, you can advertise for what you want in a student (or athlete), and the law, as far as I am aware, doesn't require you to take all comers (as it does the public schools). I am curious what percentage of students at private schools are special ed kids, for example, who will count against their enrollment but will probably never play a sport (or probably won't perform well on state testing, either, for that matter), and how that percentage compares to the public school statistics. I would also imagine that the median income of private school families is higher than that of public school families, so I would suspect that the money coming in from booster clubs, from tuitions, and from donations allows private schools to build costlier facilities in most cases. Having never attended a private school, I generalize here based on what I've heard and read, so if any of this is factually inaccurate to those who do/did go to private schools, feel free to correct it.

    I don't think their advantages over other city schools are quite so pronounced as they are over more rural schools, however. Even if a school like Johnson Central were to open its enrollment to all comers, we could cover a two-county, hour-wide driving radius and probably still not have the same number of potential athletes that Jefferson County does within its borders alone.

    Regardless, I personally don't think kicking out the privates - or even the publics with open enrollment - will make things any better. I'd personally never want to come right out and say we can never beat these people, so we're taking our ball and going home. I'd personally rather line up with them and try to beat them straight up with honest, hard-working, home-grown kids, and regardless of the result, I'd know in my heart we do things the right way and we do our best, whomever we're playing. You'll never learn anything or get anywhere by lying down and quitting when the competition is tough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Golfer
    First of all it doubles your numbers for football which helps but it isn't the end all be all.

    Dunbar for example somewhere I know very well. The football field must be divided into ceratin times for everyone. Girls Soccer gets the same amount of time as Football.(Boys Soccer as well). Dunbar football only gets half the field on a daily basis. Dunbar has turf and has to go by title 9. I don't think an all boy schools will have that problem.

    Girls Volley Ball must have the same amount of time as boys basketball.

    Space can be blamed on the administration I guess but taking girls sports completely out of the mix will NO DOUBT help out the boys programs.


    Money must be split up through out the Athletic program from other sports. The more money making sports must help out other programs that do not make as much money. Take Trinity's gates and split it up with Girls Basketball, Volleyball, Soccer, Golf and other girls sports and their great wallets will decrease.

    Girls have the right to money and time as well. This is a HUGE ADVANTAGE, all boy schools have.
    You are going to have to do much better than that:

    1. Doubles your number, what does that mean? You better look at this one a little closer.

    2. There is all kinds of space around Dunbar (in addition to the football field) and nobody stopping you from using it so this doesn't hold water.

    3. Splitting the money should not be an issue either because the girls should be our raising money too which should level the playing. I am sure you will say it doesn't happen but it could if you worked at it hard enough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cshs81
    I'll buy much of the above. Less competition for facilities is definitely an advantage.

    However, in your example, Dunbar's footbal team still has full practices , correct? If so, how is that a disadvantage?
    Has any of these teams like Trinity, St. X, Cov. Cath ever been told you must get off the field we have Soccer Practice at 6:00 or a game. Boys and Girls Soccer have games at home on Tuesdays and Thursdays I believe at 6:30 and the football team must be off the field by 6:00. There are times where since Dunbar's JV plays on Monday that Dunbar football will not get a practice time on Monday since Girls and Boys Soccer gets the field right after school.

    To answer your question no, Dunbar does not always get full practice time.

    (I'm not saying this is bad because of Soccer but it's a problem that All Boy Schools do not have to deal with when Girls are out of the equation.)

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    Speaking primarilly from a NKY point of view, but I think this holds true in other areas as well; I'd say a REAL advantage I've encountered would be students who come from "participation focused backgrounds". Watching my kids come through the Catholic schools systems, I was constantly amazed at the participation levels in grade and middle schools. My son's grade had 39-40 of 42 kids playing basketball from grades 3-8, similar in my daughter's class. Same held true for volleyball, soccer, baseball, softball, spelling, academic bowl, science fair, etc. Kid's were envolved and stayed envolved and I think that follows through to high school.

    I'm sure some public schools have the same experiences, but from my personal experiences, it was much more prevelant at the Catholic schools. Just didn't see it from the public school systems up here. Call it more envolved parents or whatever. More AAU teams, select soccer or baseball teams, club volleyball, etc. Money isn't the only factor either. In NKY the publics have a huge facility advantage over the privates, and the privates for the most part have to "fund raise" for everything!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Black Eagle
    I am curious what percentage of students at private schools are special ed kids, for example, who will count against their enrollment but will probably never play a sport (or probably won't perform well on state testing, either, for that matter), and how that percentage compares to the public school statistics.
    I would guess most private schools do not have programs for special needs students. However, I can't imagine a particular public school having so many of these students that it actually moves them up in class.

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    Black Eagle,

    Can you break the advantages down to one sentence each?

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