What are the real (and unavoidable) private school advantages?

Page 6 of Originally Posted by HDE Yes they do. I was talking about both. Sure we all have an advantage. We have more community support. Thats not an advantage w... 210 comments | 9058 Views | Go to page 1 →

  1. #76
    theguru's Avatar
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    This is worth repeating because a lot of people either cannot get this one through their head or choose to ignore it:

    You can't self impose restrictions on your own school district and then complain that others won't do the same. The practice is not only stupid but it is un-american.
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  2. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by theguru
    But that is a local decision. In other words, the schools in Kenton and Boone county could take out of district students if they wanted to. This one is NOT unavoidable.
    No they could not take them, there is nowhere to put them. With X # of students moving into the district each year, they are having to basically add on to schools every year just to keep up with enrollment each year. It's gonna be real interesting in the next 6-10 years to see where all the kids go. We now have the 3 largest elementary schools in the state.

  3. #78
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    I guess that means if I adopt ten kids tomorrow they can't go to school in Boone County...

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    Quote Originally Posted by theguru
    I guess that means if I adopt ten kids tomorrow they can't go to school in Boone County...
    No, they would HAVE to provide the space for you......thereby disallowing room for 10 more out of district kids. And why the roll of eyes? If you think I'm being overboard, try walking through the halls of any of the 3 high schools when classes change, or check out the 6 mobile units at Conner.

  5. #80
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    I know the Boone County schools are crowded and I know Boone County gets a raw deal on funding but my point is there is always room for more students and you can always add on and add teachers which means this is NOT unavoidable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theguru
    I know the Boone County schools are crowded and I know Boone County gets a raw deal on funding but my point is there is always room for more students and you can always add on and add teachers which means this is NOT unavoidable.
    If you know they get a raw deal on funding, they how can you say they "can always add on and add teachers"? Wouldn't that pretty much make it unavoidable, thereby making open enrollment not an option?

  7. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by BGGreen
    Maybe there aren't any Real AND Unavoidable Advantages?? But maybe it's too early for this answer!! Or too honest!!
    I think I was onto something here.

  8. #83

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    A lot is made of the supposed academic advantages at private schools, but I wonder what would happen at Trinity, for example, if a fleet of buses dropped off a couple hundred of the worst students from Shawnee, for example.

    The private schools usually only get the best students with the parents who have the money/interest to send their children there, perhaps to get them away from some of the undesirables at public schools, which don't have the luxury to pick and choose who they take.

    I don't know much about Louisville, but it seems you a group of haves and a group of have nots with open enrollment. The ones who have the resources escape to the "have" schools and the ones who can't must stay in the "have not" schools.

    Money is a pretty big advantage and a lot of the private schools seem to have the parents/alumni with the money to support the programs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by akw4572
    If you know they get a raw deal on funding, they how can you say they "can always add on and add teachers"? Wouldn't that pretty much make it unavoidable, thereby making open enrollment not an option?
    Trinity has added over 400 students in the past few years. Over $18,000,000 was spent on new classrooms, science labs, computer labs and athletic facilities. If your school needs facilities that taxes won't cover, start a fund drive. Hit your alumni for big bucks. Ask each school family to come up with money.

  10. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by HDE
    A lot is made of the supposed academic advantages at private schools, but I wonder what would happen at Trinity, for example, if a fleet of buses dropped off a couple hundred of the worst students from Shawnee, for example.

    The private schools usually only get the best students with the parents who have the money/interest to send their children there, perhaps to get them away from some of the undesirables at public schools, which don't have the luxury to pick and choose who they take.

    I don't know much about Louisville, but it seems you a group of haves and a group of have nots with open enrollment. The ones who have the resources escape to the "have" schools and the ones who can't must stay in the "have not" schools.

    Money is a pretty big advantage and a lot of the private schools seem to have the parents/alumni with the money to support the programs.
    The average (note I said average) private school does not come close to having these unlimited funds everyone keeps referencing, and in fact is constantly fighting the budget battle, without the supposed benefactors. They are working for the most part out of out dated facilities and with less than current equipment. They work out of computer "labs" where the students share PC's, instead of most public schools, who boast more computer equipment than IBM!!

    Just answering a mis-statement, I've seen repeated on here so often I want to barf!! Relating to the topic of this thread, this is not a real or unavoidable advantage for the publics/privates, as if you try hard enough, enough money can be raised.

    And by the way, no parent or alumni has more money than the public schools' Ole' Uncle Sam!!

  11. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trinity alum
    Trinity has added over 400 students in the past few years. Over $18,000,000 was spent on new classrooms, science labs, computer labs and athletic facilities. If your school needs facilities that taxes won't cover, start a fund drive. Hit your alumni for big bucks. Ask each school family to come up with money.
    The Boone County schools average over 1,000 students each year (3 per day). So at that rate, all we need to do is raise over $36,000,000 each year if $18,000,000 is what you needed to do 400.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TWOKNIGHTS
    What high horse are you referring to?
    I really respect Lexington Catholic I always have and I like to have fun with them. But their has been this image in Lexington that Lexington Catholic has always been better than the public schools in football because the public schools are AFRAID to play them. That's not true. Nothing would make me happier to see Lexington Catholic play Dunbar or Henry Clay in the next few years and we can see who is the best in the City once and for all.

    This year for example out of Henry Clay, Lexington Catholic, and Dunbar their are three very good football teams in the city. If these three teams were to play (Dunbar and Henry Clay do) who knows who comes out with the victory. I think Henry Clay is the best as of right now but who knows for sure. Catholic could be better than all the public schools or they could be as low as three in my opinion this year but know body knows for sure.

    The boycott never has and never wil have anything to do with the players and coaches.

    Hope for a future contest.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BGGreen
    The average (note I said average) private school does not come close to having these unlimited funds everyone keeps referencing, and in fact is constantly fighting the budget battle, without the supposed benefactors. They are working for the most part out of out dated facilities and with less than current equipment. They work out of computer "labs" where the students share PC's, instead of most public schools, who boast more computer equipment than IBM!!

    Just answering a mis-statement, I've seen repeated on here so often I want to barf!! Relating to the topic of this thread, this is not a real or unavoidable advantage for the publics/privates, as if you try hard enough, enough money can be raised.

    And by the way, no parent or alumni has more money than the public schools' Ole' Uncle Sam!!

    The schools may have more money supplied by the state, but I'm talking about the parents and communities.
    I don't know if you have any idea how poor so many of the communities/counties are. There is no comparison to the money that can be raised when the majority of a school's students are from middle/upper class families compared to schools where 80 percent of the kids are on free or reduced lunches.

  14. #89
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    I think the only unavoidable (this is a loaded word) advantage is the parental involvement, and their attitude toward their child’s school.

    It has been said many times in many posts that this is an advantage. Using Guru's definition of unavoidable, this is the only one.

    You cannot change a parents views of a school when they were high school dropouts themselves and would prefer that their child not go to school. When this child decides to go out for a sport they do it on their own. When parents don't involve themselves in their child’s sport that child may still succeed but makes it very difficult (which is a disadvantage).

    Guru every time someone comes up with an argument your response is work harder. That in itself is a disadvantage, if a student at a private school does not have to "hustle, raise money, share playing fields, find someone else other than their parents to ride them to and from practice" then they have an advantage.

    I will once again reaffirm my belief that the answer is not splitting private and public. I also do not believe there is a true answer to equal the playing field.

    All I want is for the private schools to realize they do have an advantage. This in no way takes away from what they accomplish, their kids worked hard and earned it. When some public schools work as hard as private all they accomplish is being able to field a team, because they are trying to overcome so much.

  15. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by HDE
    The schools may have more money supplied by the state, but I'm talking about the parents and communities.
    I don't know if you have any idea how poor so many of the communities/counties are. There is no comparison to the money that can be raised when the majority of a school's students are from middle/upper class families compared to schools where 80 percent of the kids are on free or reduced lunches.
    I certainly do understand your points, especially how poor some of these communities are. Wouldn't argue your points on the fact a lot of schools, public and private, have big advantages on others when it comes to alumni/parent/community involvement.

    My point however, is the majority of the 46 private schools the KHSAA is seeking to ban, especially the smaller Catholic schools, are not sitting around having meetings on how to spend their excess millions; but rather are arguably doing significantly more with far less resource-wise that their public counterparts!!

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