What are the real (and unavoidable) private school advantages?

Page 14 of Originally Posted by HDE Yes they do. I was talking about both. Sure we all have an advantage. We have more community support. Thats not an advantage w... 210 comments | 9061 Views | Go to page 1 →

  1. #196

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    Would that belittle of us?
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  2. #197

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frances Bavier
    To be honest with you Fastbreak, I have absolutely no intention of participating in this seemingly unending debate.

    This issue is much like religion, politics, abortion, homosexual rights, etc. in that it has no attainable resolution that will satisfy both sides. Everyone with a functioning brain stem and an interest in this issue has an opinion, and almost no one is going to change their position.

    Thanks,
    Frances
    If these threads get moved to the Politics and Religion Forum, I'm turning in my moderator card! :fight:

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    oldschoolwrestler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frances Bavier
    jurisprudence
    OK I'm out of my league. I had to look this word up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldschoolwrestler
    OK I'm out of my league. I had to look this word up.
    I thought Jurist Prudence was Judge Judy's sister.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HHSDad
    I thought Jurist Prudence was Judge Judy's sister.
    I thought he was related to Judas Priest

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    oldschoolwrestler's Avatar
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    I thought it might have something to do with juicing prunes

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    Frances Bavier's Avatar
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    When you're my age, prune juice is a true elixir - if you know what I mean ...

    Frances

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frances Bavier
    When you're my age, prune juice is a true elixir - if you know what I mean ...

    Frances
    I tried... I really tried... but I just can't help it... that's funny.

  9. #204
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Professor
    You need to take a tour of some of the poor areas of the state and see what they have from the "bottomless pit of tax dollars" you mention. You would probably change your opinion a little. The county I live in has just one high school. It doesn't have a drama class, a band, a music teacher, an art class, to name a few classes that other schools take for granted. Also, most schools have a nice, roomy auditorium to have their meetings and assemblies for their students,...but not our school...we can't afford it. They meet in the gym...sitting in the bleachers....looking at scoreboards and basketball goals.
    We are a public school in a small populated mountain county (119th in the state). We are one of the "have nots".

    The fact that you have such poor school facilities, and public schools like Dunbar, Atherton, Ballard and others have college like campuses, proves that there will never be a level playing field in athletics or academics in Kentucky. Public or Private.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Corps
    The fact that you have such poor school facilities, and public schools like Dunbar, Atherton, Ballard and others have college like campuses, proves that there will never be a level playing field in athletics or academics in Kentucky. Public or Private.
    This gets to the heart of the issue. There are "have" schools and there are "have not" schools. I have no problem saying that the private schools are haves, but they aren't the only ones. If you eliminate them from competition all that will happen is a different set of haves will surface. Most of them are already pretty successful. How about instead, we raise the level of the have not schools. To me the schools with the most at risk students deserve the best facilities and teachers and the smallest class sizes. That takes money and I know that paying for things that the government needs to do is not popular these days, but it needs to be done.

  11. #206
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    Let’s be realistic, the advantages of the most private schools over their public counterparts are many, and splitting the private schools off from the public schools will negate none of them. I cannot speak for rural areas of the state, as they have a completely different set of problems, but in Jefferson County the following holds true:

    1. Prior to high school, private grade schools offer:
    a. Organized sports starting in the 2nd grade.
    b. Participation is strongly encouraged
    c. Multiple skill level teams in most sports
    d. Quality coaching
    e. Strong competition

    2. During High School:
    a. Strong “feeder” system, see above
    b. Kids want to attend their “favorite” school
    c. Religious based values can be taught
    d. Many are national recognized “Blue Ribbon” schools
    e. Administration supports sports and many other extra-curricular activities
    f. Non-sanctioned sports such as hockey and lacrosse are offered
    g. High profile athletic programs
    h. Talented teachers and coaches are attracted to the atmosphere
    i. Family tradition

    3. After High School:
    a. Strong and active Alumni/Alumnae associations
    b. Large percentage of funding comes from Alumni
    c. Many business and civic leaders are Alumni of private schools
    d. Networking

    I am sure there are more but that is the best I can come up with in this short amount of time. The best I can tell, none of these advantages will go away if the KHSAA splits the private schools off into a separate class. I think the private schools will only get stronger.

    Can the public schools duplicate these advantages? Yes they can, if you look at some of the schools in NKY such as HHS you will see that they have many of the same advantages (except for teaching religion) that many of the private schools have. I am sure there are other communities with similar advantages, perhaps they can let the KHSAA know how they did it so other schools can do the same.

  12. #207
    Frances Bavier's Avatar
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    Old Corps -

    You did an excellent job of summing up the advantages, with one exception. Both prior to high school and in high school itself, private schools have the right (and they excercise it - as they should) to get rid of "problem kids". Public schools do not have this luxury (Male and Manual are the exceptions). These "problem kids" consume an inordinate amount of resources, and are highly disruptive if allowed to stay in the main population of students.

    Until (and unless) the people of this Commonwealth (and country) change their mind about the rights of people that do not want to participate by adhering to the rules, this problem will not go away.

    Thanks,
    Frances

  13. #208
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frances Bavier
    Old Corps -

    You did an excellent job of summing up the advantages, with one exception. Both prior to high school and in high school itself, private schools have the right (and they excercise it - as they should) to get rid of "problem kids". Public schools do not have this luxury (Male and Manual are the exceptions). These "problem kids" consume an inordinate amount of resources, and are highly disruptive if allowed to stay in the main population of students.

    Until (and unless) the people of this Commonwealth (and country) change their mind about the rights of people that do not want to participate by adhering to the rules, this problem will not go away.

    Thanks,
    Frances
    I agree, it is a shame to see less than 10% of the student body disrupt the teaching of the 90% who want to learn. The problem children are truly "special needs" children also, and there needs to be a system in place that can handle their situation as well.

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    Ms. Bavier, your post hit the nail on the head. These "problem" students are a terrible burden on our public schools. The general public (ie: taxpayers) would be shocked to know the disproportionate amount of school resources (funds, facilities, teachers's time, and administrators's time) that are expended on these students.
    The ability to avoid these students is a great selling point for private schools. Obviously, it is an advantage for the privates. However, under our system of public education (No Child Left Behind, KERA, social promotion, mainstreaming, etc.), it is an advantage that will always exist.
    It all reminds me of a statement attributed to the superintendent of a northeastern Kentucky superintendent. He said that, given enough opportunity, any child can master any concept. That is not remotely realistic. Some can't and some won't. What can we do? I don't know. However, I do know that pouring more money into the problem will not help. To date, it never has produced positive results. I am continually amazed at how well the nonachievers and ner-do-wells know their "rights". Unfortunately, they seem unaware of their corresponding responsibilities in this society.

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    Quote Originally Posted by StThomasMore
    ... I am continually amazed at how well the nonachievers and ner-do-wells know their "rights". Unfortunately, they seem unaware of their corresponding responsibilities in this society.
    And there you have it ...

    Frances

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