The responsibilities of a HS Head Coach

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  1. #16
    PurplePride92's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PP1 View Post
    @PurplePride92 Why exactly is this in the controversial room?
    Because it can be a controversial topic.
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  2. #17

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    I think the head coach does have a responsibility to advise his players what they need to do to play at the next level. I also think the head coach has a responsibility to be completely honest with his player about their ability level. Beyond that, the player must take it and run with it. College coaches do not want to hear from parents, coaches, recruiting services, etc. They want to hear from the player himself so they can begin to build a relationship with the player and find out how passionate the player is. Coaches can advise and lead players as to the steps, but beyond that, its the player's responsibility.

  3. #18
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    I will say from personal experience with my son, he would not haven't gotten the offers he received had it not been for his football coaching staff.

    Once he received his first from Marshall, the coaching staff utilized their coaching network to reach out to every contact they had to take a look at my sons Hudl Hilight tape.

    From that point on, the phone never stopped ringing. 14 offers later my son made his pick.

    But the thing about it is, almost all of those offers had ties back to our coaching staff and relationships they had built over the years.

    Take all of that away, we as a family joined a recruiting agency (NCSA). Even without the coaching network, this is a great way to get your name out there. Now I will say you won't get many look from D1 this way, but if your kids aspires to play at the college level, there is a place out there for you to do it. It just may not be a school you have ever heard of.

    Just for fun I checked my NCSA email account and currently have 112 unopened emails from schools reaching out to us. NCSA is not cheap.....but it will provide a pathway to play at the next level.

  4. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by 85_Rebel View Post
    I will say from personal experience with my son, he would not haven't gotten the offers he received had it not been for his football coaching staff.

    Once he received his first from Marshall, the coaching staff utilized their coaching network to reach out to every contact they had to take a look at my sons Hudl Hilight tape.

    From that point on, the phone never stopped ringing. 14 offers later my son made his pick.

    But the thing about it is, almost all of those offers had ties back to our coaching staff and relationships they had built over the years.

    Take all of that away, we as a family joined a recruiting agency (NCSA). Even without the coaching network, this is a great way to get your name out there. Now I will say you won't get many look from D1 this way, but if your kids aspires to play at the college level, there is a place out there for you to do it. It just may not be a school you have ever heard of.

    Just for fun I checked my NCSA email account and currently have 112 unopened emails from schools reaching out to us. NCSA is not cheap.....but it will provide a pathway to play at the next level.
    Thank you, we have been looking into NCSA. The make an excellent pitch, but I wonder how truly helpful they would be. Gonna have to decide something soon. Your comments have given me something to think about. Thanks again.

  5. #20

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    Here's what I see going on.

    it's not that coaches aren't "helping" kids get athletic scholarships.

    it's that coaches are "enabling" situations that hurt a kid's chances of getting eligible. I won't mention names. But you guys know where I'm from. There is a coach down here that produces very good teams with very good players but virtually NONE of them qualify for college. The two school across town continually produces d-1 players. One public, one private.

    The coach i'm talking about is rumored to make sure his kids can get in classes where their eligibility is never in question. Yet when it comes time to make it through the ncaa clearinghouse, they don't make it...

  6. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kentuckywildcat#1 View Post
    Here's what I see going on.

    it's not that coaches aren't "helping" kids get athletic scholarships.

    it's that coaches are "enabling" situations that hurt a kid's chances of getting eligible. I won't mention names. But you guys know where I'm from. There is a coach down here that produces very good teams with very good players but virtually NONE of them qualify for college. The two school across town continually produces d-1 players. One public, one private.

    The coach i'm talking about is rumored to make sure his kids can get in classes where their eligibility is never in question. Yet when it comes time to make it through the ncaa clearinghouse, they don't make it...
    Where is "down here"?

  7. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawildcat View Post
    Where is "down here"?
    Take a look at my posts and you can probably figure it out. I'm not going to cast stones directly at any coaches or schools.

  8. #23
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    I've seen a local coach that used to go above and beyond trying to get his kids to the next level. He'd tell the incoming freshmen that if they listened to the coaches and worked hard he would do everything he could to help them play at the next level. Then he delivered on that commitment to them.

    I think many coaches would agree the toughest thing to do is to recruit the hallways and get all able-bodied kids out for whatever sport, especially football. When a coach shows them and parents that it is a realistic path to college you get interest from some kids that you'd have never got before. This coach routinely had a much bigger roster of kids playing football than the other similar sized schools in this area...I don't think that was a coincidence.

    If a coach doesn't have time or chooses not to that's fine too, but coaches that put the effort in I think get a benefit from it also.

  9. #24
    PurplePride92's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 85_Rebel View Post
    I will say from personal experience with my son, he would not haven't gotten the offers he received had it not been for his football coaching staff.

    Once he received his first from Marshall, the coaching staff utilized their coaching network to reach out to every contact they had to take a look at my sons Hudl Hilight tape.

    From that point on, the phone never stopped ringing. 14 offers later my son made his pick.

    But the thing about it is, almost all of those offers had ties back to our coaching staff and relationships they had built over the years.

    Take all of that away, we as a family joined a recruiting agency (NCSA). Even without the coaching network, this is a great way to get your name out there. Now I will say you won't get many look from D1 this way, but if your kids aspires to play at the college level, there is a place out there for you to do it. It just may not be a school you have ever heard of.

    Just for fun I checked my NCSA email account and currently have 112 unopened emails from schools reaching out to us. NCSA is not cheap.....but it will provide a pathway to play at the next level.
    Iím glad you shared this because a prominent HS football coach was the inspiration behind this thread. Iím not going to publicly name the coach but this coach is a successful coach who is a household name and there are multiple people who feel he doesnít do enough to put kids into college. I find that claim odd because every year there are multiple kids that play football at the next level once they graduate high school. Thereís no way this coach is having several kids play at the next level and he isnít doing anything at all to help them on top of maintaining a highly competitive program. I think people either generally donít know what to do and when things donít work out for them they blame the HS coach. Iíve always felt that if a kid is serious about playing at the next level in whatever sport and if they want their HS Head Coach involved then there needs to be a meeting with the kid, parents and coach so expectations can be set by all sides. The more the lines of communication are open the more can be accomplished and I think your story is a great example of that.

  10. #25
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    To prepare a kid that has talent to go on and play at the next level, the best thing a high school coach can do is hold kids ACCOUNTABLE.

  11. #26
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    And......push kids out of their comfort zone.

  12. #27
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    For the record, my earlier post was addressing basketball primarily, but the same applies to most every other sport save for football. In football, you have to have a HC who is willing to help you since there are few opportunities outside of varsity competition to prove your mettle.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kentuckywildcat#1 View Post
    Here's what I see going on.

    it's not that coaches aren't "helping" kids get athletic scholarships.

    it's that coaches are "enabling" situations that hurt a kid's chances of getting eligible. I won't mention names. But you guys know where I'm from. There is a coach down here that produces very good teams with very good players but virtually NONE of them qualify for college. The two school across town continually produces d-1 players. One public, one private.

    The coach i'm talking about is rumored to make sure his kids can get in classes where their eligibility is never in question. Yet when it comes time to make it through the ncaa clearinghouse, they don't make it...
    I think what you are talking about as far as academic eligibility does not fall on the coach as much as it falls on the school admin (aka guidance counselor). Coaches certainly should hold his players accountable for making good grades but counselors are the one who know what the core requirements are to get kids academically eligible for college. So if you are taking underwater basket weaving and not the required English classes....that is not the coaches fault, but the player and schools administrators.

  14. #29

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    When you accept a head coaching job getting kids to the next level is part of that job. A coach should ask the kids prior to the season if anyone would want to play at the next level then take those kids and meet separately and come up with a plan on what the process will be moving forward.

  15. #30

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    High school basketball is different than football for sure. In basketball, you have to get out on the AAU circuit. All the gauntlets and tournaments were built and derived so coaches wouldn't have to go out to Siberia looking for a kid. The best kids would now be concentrated in certain cities and events; and the coaches could sit there for days and evaluate. The high school coach has a role, but more than anything it is more on the admin side with grades and eligibility issues. I don't think he is close to being responsible for getting a kid a scholly, There are always exceptions to a rule and the Jake Ohmers will always find their way to bigger colleges. He is more of the exception. For aspiring high school basketball players you must be playing basketball during the spring and summer in gyms where college coaches are sitting drinking coffee all day watching basketball; AAU has mandated this.

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