Severing tenured employees to avoid retirement plan funding costs.

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    Severing tenured employees to avoid retirement plan funding costs.

    In the Girls bball thread, there is discussion regarding the dismissal of an almost tenured, successful, coach who was dismissed, for reasons that appear to be solely economic. For background, that thread is here :

    Mason County girls Coach Piper Lyndsey

    I am deeply disturbed by this situation on many levels.

    First, as the spouse of a coach, the levels of sacrifice that reverberate throughout the family are large, and this action is a flat out betrayal of trust that makes those sacrifices difficult to justify.

    Second, I've always had employer trust issues, which is why I have been a career contractor. I ALWAYS get the feeling that the level of loyalty expected is very different from the loyalty offered.

    So, my question to the BGP community is :

    Is this just an acceptable practice to sever productive employees because of cost increases?
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    Its done everywhere so I guess the answer would be yes.

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    Not to dismiss it or sound callus but it happens all the time in the real world. Why is this situation any different?

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    One administration position could probably fund 3 teaching positions, but you never seem to see those positions get cut!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pioneer.Pride View Post
    One administration position could probably fund 3 teaching positions, but you never seem to see those positions get cut!
    Again welcome to the real world. It happens all the time.

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    So the pay for teachers in Ohio is higher, and I believe they are unionized, which would help keep this from happening. So, why teach in KY?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pioneer.Pride View Post
    So the pay for teachers in Ohio is higher, and I believe they are unionized, which would help keep this from happening. So, why teach in KY?
    Again, real world. If you can do better at another job take it.

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    Might be more to this than you realize. Might not be but she got into some trouble before her tenure at Mason Co.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milfordflash View Post
    Might be more to this than you realize. Might not be but she got into some trouble before her tenure at Mason Co.
    That maybe idk her, but I do have contacts inside Mason Co Schools that have told me that most all non tenure teachers were getting pink slips this year.

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    How does the tenure thing work? If she gets another job somewhere else and teaches, is she then tenured? Does it matter what school district she teaches at next, in regards to tenure?

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    Quote Originally Posted by doubledeuce View Post
    How does the tenure thing work? If she gets another job somewhere else and teaches, is she then tenured? Does it matter what school district she teaches at next, in regards to tenure?
    If she goes to another district, she starts all over again, (4 years, plus 1 day).

    If your already a tenured teacher, you have to work (1 year, 1 day) in the new district to be tenured.

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    Of course it seems unfair but what difference has that ever made? On the other hand, an employee will often leave at the drop of a hat to make more somewhere else. It's a two way street. Schools in particular are in a tough spot these days.

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    Quote Originally Posted by All Tell View Post
    Again, real world. If you can do better at another job take it.
    Is there a fake world? I teach in the real world.

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    With all due respect, and I used to work in education. It's tough, it's not for everyone, I opted to leave. Teaching has benefits unlike most other jobs, therefore it's not like a real world job. And for what it's worth I don't begrudge teacher these benefits.

    1. All the time off. I would love to have spring break, summer break, winter break and all the holidays that teacher get. And before you start about ConEd and advanced educational requirements I don't buy it. In my job I need ConEd but I don't have days built into my schedule to provide it nor do I have 3 months off in the summer to get it.

    2. Tenure. There's not another job in the world that just because you've done it for a few years you are automatically protected from termination. It makes it almost impossible to terminate a bad teacher.

    3. Retirement. Several friends my age have retired with a defined benefits pension. I'm not 60 yet. I'd LOVE to have that option. People in the real world not only have to work until they are at least 65 and even then have to hope they've accumulated enough in their retirement plan or you end up flipping burgers of greeting people at Wal-Mart because you can't afford total retirement.

    I am sorry that anyone loses their job, I've been through it, it's traumatic. I'm also sorry but to say it shouldn't happen just because someone is a teacher is a bit of an insult when people in other professions that require just as much education and don't have the perks of teaching face it every day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by All Tell View Post
    With all due respect, and I used to work in education. It's tough, it's not for everyone, I opted to leave. Teaching has benefits unlike most other jobs, therefore it's not like a real world job. And for what it's worth I don't begrudge teacher these benefits. 1. All the time off. I would love to have spring break, summer break, winter break and all the holidays that teacher get. And before you start about ConEd and advanced educational requirements I don't buy it. In my job I need ConEd but I don't have days built into my schedule to provide it nor do I have 3 months off in the summer to get it. 2. Tenure. There's not another job in the world that just because you've done it for a few years you are automatically protected from termination. It makes it almost impossible to terminate a bad teacher. 3. Retirement. Several friends my age have retired with a defined benefits pension. I'm not 60 yet. I'd LOVE to have that option. People in the real world not only have to work until they are at least 65 and even then have to hope they've accumulated enough in their retirement plan or you end up flipping burgers of greeting people at Wal-Mart because you can't afford total retirement. I am sorry that anyone loses their job, I've been through it, it's traumatic. I'm also sorry but to say it shouldn't happen just because someone is a teacher is a bit of an insult when people in other professions that require just as much education and don't have the perks of teaching face it every day.
    Tradeoff to the above is lower pay.

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