Public/Private question

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    The Scribe's Avatar
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    Public/Private question

    Here are a couple of hypothetical scenarios I want to run past you and get input on.

    1.)A player plays basketball at the varsity level of a public school as an eighth grader but transfers to another public school before their freshman year. The public school the player transferred to is 30 miles away from their old one and in a county that does not border the old county. The player's family did not move and the player's younger sibling still attends school at the old public school. Should this raise a flag with the KHSAA or is this kosher by KHSAA rules?

    2.) A player plays basketball at the middle school level of a public school and the player's family enrolls them in a private school 25 miles away in an adjoining county. The player has never played at the varsity level, but has now moved up to high school and the varsity team. The player's younger sibling competes in a varsity sport at the public school as a middle schooler. Should this raise a flag with the KHSAA or is this kosher by KHSAA rules?
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    I can see where the first example could raise some eyebrows, especially if the 8th grade competitor is a significant contributor to his or her varsity team.

    Even so, I have long been an advocate of allowing every child one transfer no questions asked during their varsity high school career. The reasons for this are many, but the simplest generalization is that it keeps control of a child's destiny in the hands of parents rather than coaches, administrators, government or bureaucracy.

    I don’t accept the notion that a child should somehow be the property of the state in terms of their scholastic endeavors, be they in the classroom or on the athletic field. The mistaken notion is that the “State” is providing the schools and the education, therefore the child should be “locked into” a particular school or district.

    We (taxpayers) are the ones who provide schools and educational opportunities, not only for our children, but for every legal U.S, citizen of school age. Therefore, we (taxpayers) should have as much freedom to procure the opportunities we feel are the best for our children. A lot can change during a child’s four year high school career, and I think an appropriate safety valve for parents and children, is to permit one transfer without penalty during that time.

    I also realize that there must be some rules and structure to keep things from becoming totally chaotic. So, multiple transfers should not be permitted except in the most dire circumstances.

    I think that we should either enforce the existing rules on recruiting, severely penalizing those truly guilty, OR, we need to do away with recruiting restrictions altogether.

    As far as the examples above, IMO any child that has yet to actually enter the 9th grade at any school should be free to transfer to any school system they choose prior to entering 9th grade… regardless of where they have competed up to that point.

    I know that many will disagree…

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Scribe
    Here are a couple of hypothetical scenarios I want to run past you and get input on.

    1.)A player plays basketball at the varsity level of a public school as an eighth grader but transfers to another public school before their freshman year. The public school the player transferred to is 30 miles away from their old one and in a county that does not border the old county. The player's family did not move and the player's younger sibling still attends school at the old public school. Should this raise a flag with the KHSAA or is this kosher by KHSAA rules?

    2.) A player plays basketball at the middle school level of a public school and the player's family enrolls them in a private school 25 miles away in an adjoining county. The player has never played at the varsity level, but has now moved up to high school and the varsity team. The player's younger sibling competes in a varsity sport at the public school as a middle schooler. Should this raise a flag with the KHSAA or is this kosher by KHSAA rules?
    Both should raise flags to the KHSAA but often times it is not the case.

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    I have no problem with a proposal of "1 transfer no questions asked" scenario like in Tennessee. If you go back to original school you are ineligible, if you move to another you're ineligible.

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    I do not like the one transfer free rule because I could see several players following a coach to a new school.

    In the cases listed above nothing illegal has happened as far as I can tell.

    Families have a right to choose what school their child attends for whatever reasons. If that reason is it betters their chance for getting college paid for then so be it.

    If I had a child who was an excellent swimmwer I would most likely be making sure that he/she went to a high school that had a very strong swimming program, with strong coaching, and other swimmers with which to form outside of school swim teams, and better my chances of getting college paid for instead of settling for the school nearest my residence.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Scribe
    Here are a couple of hypothetical scenarios I want to run past you and get input on.

    1.)A player plays basketball at the varsity level of a public school as an eighth grader but transfers to another public school before their freshman year. The public school the player transferred to is 30 miles away from their old one and in a county that does not border the old county. The player's family did not move and the player's younger sibling still attends school at the old public school. Should this raise a flag with the KHSAA or is this kosher by KHSAA rules?

    2.) A player plays basketball at the middle school level of a public school and the player's family enrolls them in a private school 25 miles away in an adjoining county. The player has never played at the varsity level, but has now moved up to high school and the varsity team. The player's younger sibling competes in a varsity sport at the public school as a middle schooler. Should this raise a flag with the KHSAA or is this kosher by KHSAA rules?
    From my understanding,

    1)kosher. Is it in the spirit of HS athletics is a totally separate question.

    2)kosher. Is it in the spirit of HS athletics is a totally separate question.

    And neither should send up red flags because neither situation seems to have violated any rules as set by the members of the KHSAA.

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    Quote Originally Posted by All Play No Work
    I do not like the one transfer free rule because I could see several players following a coach to a new school.
    Why is that a problem, if that player and that player's parents feel the the coach is the best mentor for their child?

    Why shouldn't a student athlete be able to follow a favored coach to a different school?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fastbreak
    Why is that a problem, if that player and that player's parents feel the the coach is the best mentor for their child?

    Why shouldn't a student athlete be able to follow a favored coach to a different school?
    Because I foresee bad things arising from a mass exodus.

    For example School A is runner-up for regional basketball crown while starting 2 Sophs and 3 Juniors. School B in the same region lost in the semis to School A fires their coach creating a opening and hires coach of School A for substantially more money. All 5 starters and two other players leave School A for School B to follow the coach.

    Now School A has lost their best 7 players and will scramble to field a team. School B which lost in the semifinals to School A has 7 new players that will force some returning players for School B to be cut.

    School B wins the region the next year, goes to the Sweet 16 and loses on Saturday!!!! School C notes this and offers the coach even way more money to come to to their school. He of course takes the offer leaving behind his 2 senior-to-be starters that followed him to School B.

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    I think the one transfer rule with no exceptions would be a vast improvement over the haphazardness that we see. It would make that part of KHSAA's job easier.

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    I think the one transfer rule would create a lot of one year mercenaries. Team A is good but needs a center to compete for a state championship. Bidding would begin.

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    Quote Originally Posted by All Play No Work
    Because I foresee bad things arising from a mass exodus.
    Tell me about it...

    Several schools in the 16th Region, Huntington, WV and Cincinnati benefited from a mass exodus at Rose hill two seasons ago. Russell, Raceland, Ashland, Boyd County, Fairview, Huntington High and North College Hills in Cincy all picked up key competitors.

    Even so, I am strongly in favor of parents and kids having the power to choose what school is best for them.

    NCH in Cincy led by O.J. Mayo and Bill Walker defeated Ironton for the D3 Ohio State Title.

    Huntington High led by Michael Taylor and Jamall Williams won the West Virginia State Title.

    Five 16th Region teams substantially improved their chances for success by dipping into the RHCS farm club.

    No whining, that’s just the competitive nature of the “real world” we live in. If Rose Hill had provided adequate reasons for all these young men to stay put, I’ve no doubt they would be there today. This as much as anything should debunk the MYTH that private schools are able to provide unfair incentives and to recruit.

    The fact that all of Rose Hill’s “principled” neighbors had no qualms about assimilating all of these talented young athletes into their athletic programs says a lot about the one way street the public schools want in regard to “fairness.”

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fastbreak
    Tell me about it...

    The fact that all of Rose Hill’s “principled” neighbors had no qualms about assimilating all of these talented young athletes into their athletic programs says a lot about the one way street the public schools want in regard to “fairness.”
    Amen!

    I will say that I don't believe, nor do I have any reason to believe that any of the schools who received transfers from Rose Hill did anything against the rules. But the vast majority of these players went to schools outside of the public school district in which they reside. This is in direct contrast to the complaint that I continue to read about school district boundries.

    If you remove the geographical restraints from public schools then please tell me how a private school is any different when it come to attracting students?

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