Home school students and private schools

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    Home school students and private schools

    If prop 20 goes through, should home school students be allowed to group together and form a team and compete in the private school division?
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    Why not? It would be a whole new ballgame so to speak.

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    Absolutely. Those home school parents pay income and property taxes which solely benefit the public schools. It would only be fair for them to get a little something in return for all of that outlay.

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    I may be wrong about this but I thought that home school kids were allowed to play for the school district they life in.

    As for making their own team, all they need to do is petition KHSAA and pay a membership fee. I know someone who I believed looked into this because his child was being homeschooled and he wanted him to wrestle. (He is only in gradeschool still)

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldschoolwrestler
    I may be wrong about this but I thought that home school kids were allowed to play for the school district they life in.

    As for making their own team, all they need to do is petition KHSAA and pay a membership fee. I know someone who I believed looked into this because his child was being homeschooled and he wanted him to wrestle. (He is only in gradeschool still)
    May have been the case in the past, but as I read the KHSAA web site (http://www.khsaa.org/handbook/policies.pdf), that cannot happen now. You have to be a certain type school to be able to join.

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    In Kentucky, real property owners are required to pay property taxes to fund the local public school system. All Kentucky citizens who pay state income taxes and federal income taxes have a material amount of those taxes funnelled back into public education. Even those who rent pay to support the local public schools because landlords, through rent, pass along applicable property taxes to tenants.
    Now, the KHSAA operates athletics in Kentucky in a monopolistic manner by requiring that any school that is a member of KHSAA is prohibited from playing a Kentucky school which is not a member of KHSAA. Strictly a "closed shop" approach.
    Consequently, we are left with a situation where many taxpayers are forced to support the "system" but are, because of their absolute constitutional right to home school, deprived of the basic benefits available to public schoolers. Some will argue that it is their choice thus they live with the consequences. Of course, to be consistent in their arguments, I will assume that those same individuals will argue that those who live in New Orleans chose to do so thus they should live with the consequences and not look for relief from the government (or quasi-government in regard to the KHSAA).
    I would like to see some home schoolers band together and test some of these KHSAA edicts in the courts. I would recommend a review of the "Equal Protection Clause" of the 14th Amendment as a possible place to begin.

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    Quote Originally Posted by StThomasMore
    In Kentucky, real property owners are required to pay property taxes to fund the local public school system. All Kentucky citizens who pay state income taxes and federal income taxes have a material amount of those taxes funnelled back into public education. Even those who rent pay to support the local public schools because landlords, through rent, pass along applicable property taxes to tenants.
    Now, the KHSAA operates athletics in Kentucky in a monopolistic manner by requiring that any school that is a member of KHSAA is prohibited from playing a Kentucky school which is not a member of KHSAA. Strictly a "closed shop" approach.
    Consequently, we are left with a situation where many taxpayers are forced to support the "system" but are, because of their absolute constitutional right to home school, deprived of the basic benefits available to public schoolers. Some will argue that it is their choice thus they live with the consequences. Of course, to be consistent in their arguments, I will assume that those same individuals will argue that those who live in New Orleans chose to do so thus they should live with the consequences and not look for relief from the government (or quasi-government in regard to the KHSAA).
    I would like to see some home schoolers band together and test some of these KHSAA edicts in the courts. I would recommend a review of the "Equal Protection Clause" of the 14th Amendment as a possible place to begin.
    I am not meaning to argue this point but making a point. In a Supreme Court case concerning the legality of drug testing, SC saw athletics as an "extracurricular" choice in schools and a PRIVILEGE and not RIGHT. That distinction was made when schools were REQUIRING a drug test before being allowed to participate in athletics.

    I think it would be a logical assumption that the courts could make that same view when looking at home schoolers being denied the right to playing athletics. That since they have not MET the criteria to be on the team and being on the team is a PRIVILEGE and not RIGHT, they can be denied.

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    I would respectfully suggest that your analysis is incorrect in that it would not be applicable to the question at hand. However, until the issue is raised, we will never know. My experience with home schoolers indicates that most are of moderate means. Thus, they cannot afford the material expense of defending their position through litigation. Although there is some organization among some home school advocates, it is likely not sufficient to gather enough financial support to oppose KHSAA. Legal actions, when fought properly (ie: to win) are not inexpensive. Somewhere down the line either the home schoolers or the privates (particularly those associated with religious education), will get organized and seek the help of a well-funded conservative legal group. Liberals (like in Roe v Wade for example) have done this for years.
    I obviously wouldn't guarantee the success of a legal challenge by the home schoolers. Much depends on subjective factors. Nonetheless, I would like to see the challenge. The home schoolers will never achieve much until they become more of a thorn in the side of the KHSAA. The same can be said for the privates. I still like the "Equal Protection Clause" as a good place to start.

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