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    Default Football head injuries vs. Boxing head blows

    Calling all BGP neurologists.

    Why is that NFL players seems to go straight to the point of so much depression that they kill themselves, while boxers go through the slurred speech and loss of reflexes, and never kill themselves. Name any all-time boxer: Floyd Mayweather, Roy Jones, Mike Tyson, Lennox Lewis, Sugar Ray Leonard, Marvelous Marvin Hagler, Tommy Hitman Hearns, Sugar Shane Mosley, and not to mention Muhammad Ali - they all have slurred, slower speech patterns.

    However, former NFL players never experience that. Depression immediately sets in.

    A boxer can take 4-5 shots to the head in succession in a 4-5 second span throughout a 10-12 round fight. Many of the guys listed above fought 15 round fights. An NFL player has a collision every 4-5 seconds, but not every shot is to the head.

    The NFL player is protected, and the boxer's head is not. It is during amatuer days, but many turn pro at age 20ish. The hits in football don't really get that violent until college.

    Are the NFL head injuries from poor tackling by leading with the head? Is the boxing head blow easier to absorb or easier to adapt or be conditioned to. But why no NFL players with slurred speech? Is the NFL head shot liek skipping HIV and going to full blown AIDS immediately? (Just for comparison sake, no harm intended.)
    Is just seems to me that the head inuries over the course of time would be similar. I've never seen an NFL player in Ali's condition. Please, intelligent meaningful dialogue requested here, no name calling.
    I do this in the wake of Junior Seau's suicide, the same week where two fighters on that list fought on the same card.

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    Moderator rockmom's Avatar
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    I am in no way, shape or form a neurologist, but I do know that the area of the brain that sustains injury determines the effect of the injury.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rockmom View Post
    I am in no way, shape or form a neurologist, but I do know that the area of the brain that sustains injury determines the effect of the injury.
    That would seem logical. But a boxer will get hit everywhere in the head, including a rabbit punch to the back of the head some times. But that is illegal. But the first is a warning, unless clearly intent was there and it wasn't an inaccurately thrown hook. I guess football players get hit head on and to the side as well.
    Is it the NFL lifestyle and comraderie that is missed and needed and causes the depression. As boxers are with a much smaller circle when at work.

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    Moderator rockmom's Avatar
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    Boxers take a lot of blows football players generally don't. Blows to the jaw, temples and eye/nose area...even the back of the head and without any protection. I don't have confidence
    in my recollection of my Advanced Physiology class or I'd try to offer more about the different parts of the brain. Additionally, it's rare a football player takes or delivers a hit without his helmet, so it's likely that the type of damage incurred is different based on direct vs. "cushioned" blows.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 85BearsFan View Post
    That would seem logical. But a boxer will get hit everywhere in the head, including a rabbit punch to the back of the head some times. But that is illegal. But the first is a warning, unless clearly intent was there and it wasn't an inaccurately thrown hook. I guess football players get hit head on and to the side as well.
    Is it the NFL lifestyle and comraderie that is missed and needed and causes the depression. As boxers are with a much smaller circle when at work.
    I think this really has a lot to do with it. You can see how hard it is for players to leave the game behind, and for good reason. You just hit the nail on the head.

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    I'm not sure what the answer you the question is, but I do know that boxers and football players suffering longterm brain damage from impacts generally receive different (although closely related) diagnoses:

    Football players are generally diagnosed with CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy)
    Boxers are generally diagnosed with DP (dementia pugilistica)

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    I just looked the two up, and symptoms of CTE include: disorientation, confusion, vertigo, headaches, poor judgment, overt dementia, slowed muscular movements, staggered gait, impeded speech, tremors and deafness.

    Symptoms of DP include: declining mental ability, problems with memory, and parkinsonism, or tremors and lack of coordination. It can also cause speech problems and an unsteady gait.

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    This NFL head injury stuff is gonna to have a bad effect on football that most people play, the people having these so called Head injuries from the NFL play for years, you play football for 15 years in the nfl your gonna have some side effects, that is just common sense to me. As for this depression stuff, I think it has a ton to do with the game and its good things that you miss, People get accustomed to this adrenaline filled lifestyle, competition, and the team atmosphere, and they alot of time live the game and do not have other things they enjoy to fall back on or make a living with...can cause some serious problems in your life. Add in marriage problems and money issues and that equals trouble. Has as much or more to do with it than head injuries. Weird how none of the guys who invested their money and have a happy marriage have any head injuries?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skilld-Kid View Post
    This NFL head injury stuff is gonna to have a bad effect on football that most people play, the people having these so called Head injuries from the NFL play for years, you play football for 15 years in the NFL your gonna have some side effects, that is just common sense to me. As for this depression stuff, I think it has a ton to do with the game and its good things that you miss, People get accustomed to this adrenaline filled lifestyle, competition, and the team atmosphere, and they a lot of time live the game and do not have other things they enjoy to fall back on or make a living with...can cause some serious problems in your life. Add in marriage problems and money issues and that equals trouble. Has as much or more to do with it than head injuries. Weird how none of the guys who invested their money and have a happy marriage have any head injuries?
    I'd have to agree to some extent that much of the specific example of suicide could have to do with lifestyle in many situations. Still, I'm no neurologist. I wouldn't have suspected that brain damage (resultant from cancer overtaking parts of her brain) would have caused my grandmother to think she was a child or to become combative with her husband and children - but it did. If neurologists say that CTE can cause poor judgment in its sufferers, I don't doubt it.