Enrollment drop in NKY Catholic schools

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    Enrollment drop in NKY Catholic schools

    http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.d...26/1077/NEWS01

    Kindergarten through 12th-grade enrollment is down roughly 2 percent in Diocese of Covington schools, from 11,832 students last year to 11,570 today.

    Is that cause for concern?

    "Not when I compare it to other dioceses and see that it's a national trend," said Superintendent Larry Bowman. "Catholic education is alive and well here."
    .....
    Of the nine high schools, eight gained students or stayed the same. In the elementary schools, 21 of the 30 lost students....
    Keebler said of the 7,799 Catholic schools nationwide, 2,588 have waiting lists. But at the same time, there were 173 schools that consolidated or closed last year.

    Locally, tuition is up. St. Joseph Academy in Walton went from $2,100 to $2,900 a year, up 38 percent. St. Cecilia increased from $2,700 to $3,105. Villa Madonna's high school is the most expensive at $6,240 annually, up from $5,990.

    But the bigger issue, as Keebler said is the case nationally, may be demographics.

    At St. Thomas School in Fort Thomas, enrollment dropped from 240 to 209. While Principal Sharon Bresler said a 4 percent tuition increase may have played a role in that, Fort Thomas is not a high-turnover area and is virtually landlocked, leaving little room for growth or new families to move in. Mary Queen of Heaven is also landlocked with just one subdivision in the area. What was once a rural area with homes is now dominated by businesses, including Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport.

    So to attract more students and increase revenue, these and other schools have turned to new methods this year. St. Henry School in Erlanger and St. Joseph Academy opened preschools. Mary Queen of Heaven produced a color brochure as a marketing tool. St. Thomas started an education fund and is soliciting donations for it.
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    Note: the tuitions listed seem to be not including "fees" which are on top of tuition.

    To me, there is no one issue causing a change in enrollment. It could be economic in some areas while where I live, its the principal. Some areas offer a very, very strong public school alternative(Ft Thomas, Ft Mitchell).

    However, with all of that said, the required increases in the schools' budgets will require a continued increase in tution/fees which will, in the long run, affect enrollment.

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    Three things making it difficult for Catholic schools:

    1. Cost of tuition. With less nuns, brothers and priets teaching more lay teachers have to be hired which means the cost of tuition goes way up. A lot of people simply cannot afford tuition especially if they have multiple children.

    2. Catholic schools cannot adjust very well to shifting population trends. As population shifts from urban areas to outlying areas the schools remain in the urban areas and it is very costly to build new schools from scratch.

    3. Anytime schools are consolidated, student enrollment will decline. Once families lose connection to what they perceive as "their" school, it is often difficult to justify spending that much money for a "different" school.

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    NCC's enrollment has been going up for about 6 or 7 years.....there are probably 100 more kids there now than when I graduated in 1998.

    Doesn't really sound like alot, but there were only 89 kids in my graduating class, I believe. So that's a big jump.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 98NCCalum
    NCC's enrollment has been going up for about 6 or 7 years.....there are probably 100 more kids there now than when I graduated in 1998.

    Doesn't really sound like alot, but there were only 89 kids in my graduating class, I believe. So that's a big jump.
    Same can be said for Holy Cross, Enrollment has increased since about the same since my freshman year in 98.

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    I thought it was interesting that enrollment in HS is increasing where elementary is decreasing. It might mean a drop in enrollment for the HS's in the future. I know with public schools we have to look at the enrollment at MS and elementary classes in our county to have an idea of where our enrollment is going in the future. Unlike, private schools, we are pretty much locked into that number. They have an option to explore the marketing choices that the article mentions.

    I wonder, too, it the advent of Christian private schools, Heritage Academy and Calvary Christian has played a role in the decrease in elementary students.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ladiesbballcoach
    I wonder, too, it the advent of Christian private schools, Heritage Academy and Calvary Christian has played a role in the decrease in elementary students.
    Your theory overall may be true, however, these two have not made an impact on Catholic school enrollment in NKY IMO. I'd say they're taking away from the local public schools.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ladiesbballcoach
    I thought it was interesting that enrollment in HS is increasing where elementary is decreasing. It might mean a drop in enrollment for the HS's in the future. I know with public schools we have to look at the enrollment at MS and elementary classes in our county to have an idea of where our enrollment is going in the future. Unlike, private schools, we are pretty much locked into that number. They have an option to explore the marketing choices that the article mentions.

    I wonder, too, it the advent of Christian private schools, Heritage Academy and Calvary Christian has played a role in the decrease in elementary students.
    There is also a good portion of people who don't want to spend money on private school education in grade school, but will plan on just sending the kid to the High School. I have heard from just a few people I know, that say they don't think some kids are reading for the religous aspect of education and won't truley grasp it until around High School age. So some parents don't want to in there perception waste there money until their kids are ready for this form of education.

    Holy Cross always gets a few kids each year from surronding public school districts who's families are Catholic and just wanted to wait to pay for school until High School. A majority of these kids are either not athletes are make minimal impact on athletics.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ladiesbballcoach
    I thought it was interesting that enrollment in HS is increasing where elementary is decreasing. It might mean a drop in enrollment for the HS's in the future. I know with public schools we have to look at the enrollment at MS and elementary classes in our county to have an idea of where our enrollment is going in the future. Unlike, private schools, we are pretty much locked into that number. They have an option to explore the marketing choices that the article mentions.

    I wonder, too, it the advent of Christian private schools, Heritage Academy and Calvary Christian has played a role in the decrease in elementary students.
    All of what you have listed is possible.

    One would have to study the public school numbers in the areas where there is a decrease or increase for Catholic schools to see if there are just X number of students total.

    One would have to study the enrollment of the Christian schools to see of those students where they would have attended school if that school hadn't opened.

    Another "new" possibility for a decrease in future years would be the cost of transporting a student to a private school. With nearly no bus service, the cost of getting a student to school with the X-price of gas might become a consideration on top of tuition and fees cost.

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    Quote Originally Posted by All Play No Work
    All of what you have listed is possible.

    One would have to study the public school numbers in the areas where there is a decrease or increase for Catholic schools to see if there are just X number of students total.

    One would have to study the enrollment of the Christian schools to see of those students where they would have attended school if that school hadn't opened.

    Another "new" possibility for a decrease in future years would be the cost of transporting a student to a private school. With nearly no bus service, the cost of getting a student to school with the X-price of gas might become a consideration on top of tuition and fees cost.
    Great question. I wonder if Campbell County would ever look at the prospect of not transporting the Brossart students anymore because of costs. Although, since their students for the most part, I would assume, live side-by-side, I don't see how it would increase their transportation costs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ladiesbballcoach
    Great question. I wonder if Campbell County would ever look at the prospect of not transporting the Brossart students anymore because of costs. Although, since their students for the most part, I would assume, live side-by-side, I don't see how it would increase their transportation costs.
    I am not familiar with how that works for Brossart and Campbell County.

    Do private students pay anything for the bus rides or do the private schools pay anything based on number of students or can anyone that pays taxes in that county ride the bus for free?

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    Quote Originally Posted by All Play No Work
    I am not familiar with how that works for Brossart and Campbell County.

    Do private students pay anything for the bus rides or do the private schools pay anything based on number of students or can anyone that pays taxes in that county ride the bus for free?
    My understanding and this would not be something to swear on is that Brossart kids are transported with no charge. I don't think they limit it to who pays taxes. They offer that service to everyone. The middle school (used to be the HS) is about 2 blocks from Brossart HS. The HS is now 3-4 miles away.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ladiesbballcoach
    My understanding and this would not be something to swear on is that Brossart kids are transported with no charge. I don't think they limit it to who pays taxes. They offer that service to everyone. The middle school (used to be the HS) is about 2 blocks from Brossart HS. The HS is now 3-4 miles away.
    I think the bus system is something the entire community pays for , I would think the students at Brossart have a right to the transportation if the cost is not that much higher.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigStud
    I think the bus system is something the entire community pays for , I would think the students at Brossart have a right to the transportation if the cost is not that much higher.
    Just because you pay taxes does not give you the right to everything the government does, or there would be a lot more people on welfare. It might here but paying taxes does not give you a blank check.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ladiesbballcoach
    Just because you pay taxes does not give you the right to everything the government does, or there would be a lot more people on welfare. It might here but paying taxes does not give you a blank check.

    This is another example of someone trying to compare to situations that are not remotley the same. Everyone doesn't get welfare because you have to meet certain guidlelines or qualifications. What is the difference between a majority of CC students and Brossart students? Basically just the school they attend. They have all the same basic qualifications. They are students who need a ride to school.

    This is silly to argue I just hate it when people compare apples and oranges to prove their point.

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