Dick's Sporting Goods to Stop Selling Assault-Style Rifles

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  1. #346
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockmom View Post
    Dicks flat out said they want to minimize the potential that their brand becomes a part of the narrative in a school shooting. They haven’t lied, not hidden their intentions. They aren’t sneaky about it, nor hiding it. They aren’t casting any aspersions as to the intentions of another retailer who does things differently. They feel this is in the best interest of their brand. Really, that’s all they are doing...protecting their brand.
    I didn't say they were being sneaky or hiding anything. I said it's a PR move. They have a whopping 35 stores that sold them. They're jumping on the social bandwagon and hoping it reeks benefits. Just how I see it.

    If they come out and say they're not selling baseball bats because people are being killed by them, then I'm a believer.
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    It truly amazes me that people actually want to look at this move as something that will somehow stop a shooter. Is it a nice gesture? Sure, but that's where it ends. As @plantmanky pointed out if Dicks really, really cared they'd end all ammo sales as well as shotgun and bolt action rifles. But they won't for obvious reasons.

    The thing that amazes me more is how focused people are on the weapon used rather than the real problem, the people killing innocent people. I've seen the rifle used attacked. I've seen the NRA attacked. I've seen a certain group attacked. None of those are the reason this tragedy happened. But that's where the focus is. And, make no mistake about it, these are the only things where the focus is going to be. There's an obvious reason, but I can't get in to that here.

  3. #348
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    Another thing I want to point out is the social media warriors that relentlessly and inaccurately hammer away at the AR-15 and any other "assault weapon" (which they aren't) as if they think they're going to bring about some kind of change. Well (those of you that this applies to) congratulations, you've made a difference but not the kind you think. Government and industry data show that sales are up and always go up after these tragedies happen because everyone flips out over the guns used and it puts the focus in the wrong place. In short, you've unknowingly become salespersons for so called assault weapons.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Run To State View Post
    Another thing I want to point out is the social media warriors that relentlessly and inaccurately hammer away at the AR-15 and any other "assault weapon" (which they aren't) as if they think they're going to bring about some kind of change. Well (those of you that this applies to) congratulations, you've made a difference but not the kind you think. Government and industry data show that sales are up and always go up after these tragedies happen because everyone flips out over the guns used and it puts the focus in the wrong place. In short, you've unknowingly become salespersons for so called assault weapons.
    Really? Sales are up?
    I thought I heard that some gun companies had bad quarterly reports and sagging sales: Particularly the ones that made assault type rifles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hellcats View Post
    Really? Sales are up?
    I thought I heard that some gun companies had bad quarterly reports and sagging sales: Particularly the ones that made assault type rifles.
    More than 4 million rifles were produced in 2016, up from 1.8 million in 2010. U.S. companies have manufactured more than 70 million firearms since 2008. I recently read, last week I believe, where sales of AR-15s were up 30% in the Cape Coral, Florida area alone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hellcats View Post
    Really? Sales are up?
    I thought I heard that some gun companies had bad quarterly reports and sagging sales: Particularly the ones that made assault type rifles.
    Lines Out the Door and Strong Sales at Tampa Gun Show

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    Quote Originally Posted by Run To State View Post
    More than 4 million rifles were produced in 2016, up from 1.8 million in 2010. U.S. companies have manufactured more than 70 million firearms since 2008. I recently read, last week I believe, where sales of AR-15s were up 30% in the Cape Coral, Florida area alone.
    Smith & Wesson owner seen posting earnings decline | Fox Business

    “Gun manufacturers and retailers have seen weak consumer demand since the election of President Donald Trump. Historically, gun sales go through a period of growth under Democratic administrations, with buyers anticipating additional gun-control regulations. Shares of American Outdoor Brands and Sturm, Ruger & Co. climbed during much of President Barack Obama’s tenure in the White House, and the stocks were up in advance of the 2016 election while the industry reported strong sales.”

    This is what I saw. There is certainly concern at least at the corporate level. Maybe the ground level hasn’t felt it yet.

    Many organizations are also asking questions about their pensions that are invested in gun company stock. That gets really hairy for these publically traded companies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Run To State View Post
    Another thing I want to point out is the social media warriors that relentlessly and inaccurately hammer away at the AR-15 and any other "assault weapon" (which they aren't) as if they think they're going to bring about some kind of change. Well (those of you that this applies to) congratulations, you've made a difference but not the kind you think. Government and industry data show that sales are up and always go up after these tragedies happen because everyone flips out over the guns used and it puts the focus in the wrong place. In short, you've unknowingly become salespersons for so called assault weapons.
    They're now called "assault style weapons" or "assault type weapons". It's as if they know theyre wrong when they say assault rifles or assault weapons, but can't give it up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hellcats View Post
    Smith & Wesson owner seen posting earnings decline | Fox Business

    “Gun manufacturers and retailers have seen weak consumer demand since the election of President Donald Trump. Historically, gun sales go through a period of growth under Democratic administrations, with buyers anticipating additional gun-control regulations. Shares of American Outdoor Brands and Sturm, Ruger & Co. climbed during much of President Barack Obama’s tenure in the White House, and the stocks were up in advance of the 2016 election while the industry reported strong sales.”

    This is what I saw. There is certainly concern at least at the corporate level. Maybe the ground level hasn’t felt it yet.

    Many organizations are also asking questions about their pensions that are invested in gun company stock. That gets really hairy for these publically traded companies.
    You wouldn't have been able to tell that at the SHOT Show. Their booth was hopping. That said, it's a very competitive business. A lot of gun companies out there, quite a number of new products as well. I think things relaxed a bit since November of 2016, but you can bank sales will grow with the current climate. That's what you're seeing in my previous two posts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by halfback20 View Post
    They're now called "assault style weapons" or "assault type weapons". It's as if they know theyre wrong when they say assault rifles or assault weapons, but can't give it up.
    They'll never give it up. They bank on emotion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by halfback20 View Post
    They're now called "assault style weapons" or "assault type weapons". It's as if they know theyre wrong when they say assault rifles or assault weapons, but can't give it up.
    This is comedy.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2018/02/21/defi...ous-issue.html

    “Following last week's Florida school killings, there's movement by gun control advocates in some states to ban so-called assault weapons.

    Yet exactly what constitutes an "assault weapon" is a contentious issue and something that riles up some gun advocates. In fact, many of the large gun groups consider "assault weapon" a made up and ambiguous term invented by the anti-gun lobby in the 1980s, maintaining that guns don't actually "assault" people.

    That said, the gun industry's traditional definition of an "assault rifle" is a weapon the military generally uses and has "select fire capabilities," or the capability to switch between semi-automatic or a fully automatic mode. However, the civilian AR-15s do not have the select fire capabilities, only semi-automatic settings, so the firearms industry insists they are not an actual assault rifle or assault weapon.
    To be clear, though, the federal government usually refers to a military-style weapon capable of firing multiple rounds, either semi-automatic or a fully automatic firearm.“

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    Quote Originally Posted by Run To State View Post
    You wouldn't have been able to tell that at the SHOT Show. Their booth was hopping. That said, it's a very competitive business. A lot of gun companies out there, quite a number of new products as well. I think things relaxed a bit since November of 2016, but you can bank sales will grow with the current climate. That's what you're seeing in my previous two posts.
    Maybe these companies are trying to drum up some business with these sad earnings reports.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hellcats View Post
    Maybe these companies are trying to drum up some business with these sad earnings reports.
    I doubt it. They don't need to, certain entities will take care of that for them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hellcats View Post
    Smith & Wesson owner seen posting earnings decline | Fox Business

    “Gun manufacturers and retailers have seen weak consumer demand since the election of President Donald Trump. Historically, gun sales go through a period of growth under Democratic administrations, with buyers anticipating additional gun-control regulations. Shares of American Outdoor Brands and Sturm, Ruger & Co. climbed during much of President Barack Obama’s tenure in the White House, and the stocks were up in advance of the 2016 election while the industry reported strong sales.”

    This is what I saw. There is certainly concern at least at the corporate level. Maybe the ground level hasn’t felt it yet.

    Many organizations are also asking questions about their pensions that are invested in gun company stock. That gets really hairy for these publically traded companies.
    The National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) conducted 25,235,215 checks last year. That's nearly 2.3 million checks fewer than the record-breaking year of 2016 but also nearly 2.1 million checks more than 2015, the third-best year on record.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Run To State View Post
    You wouldn't have been able to tell that at the SHOT Show. Their booth was hopping. That said, it's a very competitive business. A lot of gun companies out there, quite a number of new products as well. I think things relaxed a bit since November of 2016, but you can bank sales will grow with the current climate. That's what you're seeing in my previous two posts.
    I can tell you after the Vegas massacre, bump stocks were sold out everywhere. The list price was approx $100 but couldn’t be found. They were selling upwards of $700 on the secondary market. I’m sure there are some tin foil conspiracy theories about who owns stocks and profiting from these incidents.

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