Are Public schools that vote for "20" admitting inferiority?

View Poll Results: Are they admitting inferiority

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  • Yes

    15 65.22%
  • No

    8 34.78%
  1. #1
    98NCCalum's Avatar
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    Are Public schools that vote for "20" admitting inferiority?

    What do you think?
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  2. #2
    Oldbird's Avatar
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    I think they would say no.

    They are just admitting that the playing field is significantly tilted in a manner in which they can't compete.

    I would say, welcome to life.

  3. #3

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    Excellent, Oldbird. Life is not played on a "level playing field". Actually, the definition of "level playing field" is in the eyes of the beholder. The last time I checked out the football fields and basketball floors at public schools, they appeared to be level. I saw no tilt. However, when the competition begins, I think we sometimes see what they really mean by "level playing field". Possibly the solution is to incorporate handicaps in high school athletics. In other words, we level matters for Louisville Eastern (after all, Mr. Sexton appears to be the whiners chief potentate) when it plays a private school by giving them a few "advantages". How about when Eastern plays St X in football requiring that St X play with 8 players on offense and 7 on defense. For basketball, we can start the game with Dunbar receiving 10 or 20 points (depending upon the "tilt" of the floor) as a beginning bonus when they play LexCath. How is that for "leveling the playing field".

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by StThomasMore
    Excellent, Oldbird. Life is not played on a "level playing field". Actually, the definition of "level playing field" is in the eyes of the beholder. The last time I checked out the football fields and basketball floors at public schools, they appeared to be level. I saw no tilt. However, when the competition begins, I think we sometimes see what they really mean by "level playing field". Possibly the solution is to incorporate handicaps in high school athletics. In other words, we level matters for Louisville Eastern (after all, Mr. Sexton appears to be the whiners chief potentate) when it plays a private school by giving them a few "advantages". How about when Eastern plays St X in football requiring that St X play with 8 players on offense and 7 on defense. For basketball, we can start the game with Dunbar receiving 10 or 20 points (depending upon the "tilt" of the floor) as a beginning bonus when they play LexCath. How is that for "leveling the playing field".
    That's not bad. Maybe we can get Ballard to spot us ten in basketball. On second thought no. Despite all their obvious unfair advantages (after all they have won most of the basketball games between the two), it just feels good when you win anyway.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldbird
    I think they would say no.

    They are just admitting that the playing field is significantly tilted in a manner in which they can't compete.

    I would say, welcome to life.
    I think this is an area that is not limited to HS sports. I did not get to see the entire Carter/Baker press conference on the process ofr electing of the POUS, but in the little segment I saw, I heard mention that the process is not equal. (level playing field) That the poor and inner city do not have the access, resources, etc, to be involved/engaged in the process like the upper middle class and on up. That the process is determined by a select group and not a true represenation of the entire country.

    I am not saying I agree but pointing this out to say that I don't think the argument is limited to HS athletics.

  6. #6
    oldschoolwrestler's Avatar
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    It depends on how you define inferiority.

    If you are aking if they are inferior to the same possibilities of drawing talented students to their school, or starting with more talented athletes. Then yes.

    If your saying they have inferior teams/programs/coaches. I'd say no, most realize they probably have better teams/programs/coaches than private because they start with an athlete not at the same level of talent as others, and they have been able to make their teams competitive.

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    Excellent point, Trinty alum. It is much more satisfying and courageous to pull yourself up by hard work to compete with the opposition rather than to depend on bridging the gap through the proposals of the KHSAA. As you said, nothing beats the euphoria of working hard and actually beating those who normally have more talent than do you.
    In basketball, when Trinity defeats Ballard through hard work and united effort, it certainly beats winning by loading up the rules in a charade called "leveling the playing field".

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldschoolwrestler
    It depends on how you define inferiority.

    If you are aking if they are inferior to the same possibilities of drawing talented students to their school, or starting with more talented athletes. Then yes.

    If your saying they have inferior teams/programs/coaches. I'd say no, most realize they probably have better teams/programs/coaches than private because they start with an athlete not at the same level of talent as others, and they have been able to make their teams competitive.
    Most of the time Trinity plays against schools that have MORE talented athletes. What the other schools don't have is the very large number of average athletes that can work their way into being pretty good high school ball players. How many kids are roaming the halls at your school that could help your team if they would just come out. It's easy enough to blame it on some perceived unfair action by the competition. I assume you are a wrestling coach. Most years Trinity has over 80-100 kids in wrestling. How does that compare? Do you think it would get easier for you if you could convince 50 kids at your school to wrestle? Very few of these kids have done any wrestling before high school, so they are all developed in house.

  9. #9
    oldschoolwrestler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trinity alum
    Most of the time Trinity plays against schools that have MORE talented athletes. What the other schools don't have is the very large number of average athletes that can work their way into being pretty good high school ball players. How many kids are roaming the halls at your school that could help your team if they would just come out. It's easy enough to blame it on some perceived unfair action by the competition. I assume you are a wrestling coach. Most years Trinity has over 80-100 kids in wrestling. How does that compare? Do you think it would get easier for you if you could convince 50 kids at your school to wrestle? Very few of these kids have done any wrestling before high school, so they are all developed in house.
    As I have said before. I have experiences the 50-70 kids participating. It is much easier to produce top notch kids, even if they first start in high school. More competition in practice and able to practice with someone your own size. Oh I know Trinity get 80-100 every year, and why they don't win or at least give a good run towards the title every year is beyond me.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trinity alum
    Most of the time Trinity plays against schools that have MORE talented athletes.
    You can't really believe that.

    I think any school in KY would like to have Trinity's "talent" issues.

  11. #11
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    They are, but only in the sense that Title 9 keeps them from competing on a level playing field. I think that some of the 4A schools are more than able to compete with them but see this as an easy way to curry favor with some other schools administrators, and the fact that it makes winning easier for them.

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