Another private school post season play vote?

Page 2 of Originally Posted by westsider To a certain extent, I would disagree with that. I think athletes want a chance to compete for a championship. My gues i... 410 comments | 15916 Views | Go to page 1 →

  1. #16
    gametime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 02
    Location
    Big O > Every Wildcat Ever
    Posts
    88,522

    Quote Originally Posted by leatherneck
    I generally do not post critical comments about people and can't get into the merits of this proposal, but I was absolutely sick to read Superintendent Sanders state that a reason for the proposal was to allow more kids to attain a state championship. GARBAGE AND WORSE. Heck why don't they just give every one in all classes at his schools A's so they can all attain honor roll too. What a boneheaded idea. Great message for our kids: gee we are going to water down the meaning of a state champion, but maybe you'll get to be one! Just what our future leaders need to be learning as they get ready to enter a more and more competitive society: we want to make things easier for you. Not! I hope GT and JD are just as sickened with the Super's comments as I am.
    Advertisement

  2. #17
    theguru's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 00
    Location
    Florence
    Posts
    151,822

    Quote Originally Posted by leatherneck
    I generally do not post critical comments about people and can't get into the merits of this proposal, but I was absolutely sick to read Superintendent Sanders state that a reason for the proposal was to allow more kids to attain a state championship. GARBAGE AND WORSE. Heck why don't they just give every one in all classes at his schools A's so they can all attain honor roll too. What a boneheaded idea. Great message for our kids: gee we are going to water down the meaning of a state champion, but maybe you'll get to be one! Just what our future leaders need to be learning as they get ready to enter a more and more competitive society: we want to make things easier for you. Not! I hope GT and JD are just as sickened with the Super's comments as I am.
    I agree. My opinion just went way down...

    This is a side issue but I think this is even another reason to leave things the way they are:

    Jack Moreland, superintendent of the Covington Independent School District, sided with the diocese.

    "The people who send their youngsters to parochial schools are taxpayers and fund public education," said Moreland. "I think that gives them the right to participate in these types of activities."

  3. #18
    Conqueror6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 04
    Posts
    22

    Rumor, Innuendo, Bling-Bling, & Superego's

    Quote Originally Posted by LSURock
    Your example is shameful and probably represents the feelings of a number of losing programs. The kid you mentioned was a part of the team. He practiced with the team and was ready if called on. This attitude is taught at schools like Trinity and X, and is a big part of their success. I would suggest that instead of trying to eliminate the competition, try to emulate the competition.
    Also, if you are aware of any recruiting being done by any school please report it. If not, please don't bring your rumors and innuendo to this board.

    It seems to me that the "Private" school supporters are happy until the word "recruit" is spelled out. Innuendo? Maybe. I can assure you that no rumor is being passed around here. What I am suggesting is that it could be so out of control that we are to the "point of no return" on getting this injustice to Kentucky athletes corrected. Also, my comments could be viewed at shameful to those who don't have a conscience. We are talking about athletes and athletics here. This young man in question could have actually contributed something to a team at public school, but I'm sure the "Bling-Bling" associated with a championship is more enticing to immature teenagers. Matter of fact, it was the father of this young man that was proud enough to tell everyone about all the nice "jewelry" and how simple it was for his son to get some of it. Maybe there should be a course taught at some of the "Privates" on how to keep a "Superego" under control.

  4. #19

    Join Date
    Aug 01
    Location
    Burlington, KY USA
    Posts
    727

    I can't believe we have to re-hash this ridiculous argument about every month. If the energy that is expended on making things "fair" were expended on making the public schools better, then everything would be "fair". I'm just glad that the public school my son is attending (Conner) is spending it's time trying to get better in all sports instead of crying about some silly advantage they may think a certain school has. Hopefully, someday these mis-guided adults will get a clue.

  5. #20

    Join Date
    Apr 04
    Location
    Nowhere
    Posts
    1,318

    As the great Coach Schneider said a few years back to all public school administrators. "Hire better coaches".

    Also when someone is crowned State champion is it going to say Public School Champion or Private School Champion. To me that is like calling yourself the Intercontinental Champion in the WWE.

  6. #21
    MexicanBob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 01
    Posts
    556

    Comparing private schools to public schools is like comparing apples to oranges. So the question becomes do you want two totally different types of athletic programs competing together for one state title?

    I look at it this way. The state football (and all sports but basketball) are seperated into classes because there is a recognized advantage in having bigger schools and more students. To offset this advantage, schools are grouped together in similiar enrollments.

    I see the same situation existing with private vs public schools. Private schools have more resources, generally better facilities, the ability to attract (notice I didn't say recruit) athletes to fit their needs and system. I think it would be hard to argue that this didn't give them a competitive advantage.

    So I see a seperation of private vs public state championships as the same type of seperation as large vs small. Put like schools in like classifications.

  7. #22

    Join Date
    Jan 05
    Location
    Being a role model
    Posts
    34,456

    Quote Originally Posted by theguru
    I agree. My opinion just went way down...

    This is a side issue but I think this is even another reason to leave things the way they are:

    Jack Moreland, superintendent of the Covington Independent School District, sided with the diocese.

    "The people who send their youngsters to parochial schools are taxpayers and fund public education," said Moreland. "I think that gives them the right to participate in these types of activities
    ."
    In bold is a very good point. While they may not attend a public school, probably 99% pay property taxes. Some may rent and get out of property taxes but their taxes in other areas would help support the school districts.

  8. #23

    Join Date
    Jan 05
    Location
    Being a role model
    Posts
    34,456

    Quote Originally Posted by Rambo4343
    As the great Coach Schneider said a few years back to all public school administrators. "Hire better coaches".
    Also when someone is crowned State champion is it going to say Public School Champion or Private School Champion. To me that is like calling yourself the Intercontinental Champion in the WWE.

    It is simply not that simple. It might be for the 4A public city schools but it is not that simple for the rural county schools.

    Good example is golf. $2500 to be a member of the country club in my county. Only 5 of my 14 golfers are members. Can't afford it. So they get to play 2 months out of the year. I feel safe in saying that Notre Dame, Bishop Brossart, Villa Madonna, Lex Catholic, etc. more than 40% of their golfers find themselves as members of a country club.

    I am NOT saying separate the two, but saying the situation is unequal and there is a distinct advantage. So when you say simply hire better coaches, you got to remember that rural, public school coaches have to do MORE and a BETTER job than the private school coaches, because the private school coaches are usually starting with better polished athletes. Unless you feel that a golfer can be just as good playing 2 months out of the year vs. a golfer than can play from April through October everyday of the week.

  9. #24
    XgradROCKdad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 05
    Posts
    1,721

    I'll be your waiter tonight Mr. Crump... please allow me to bring you some cheese to go with your WHINE.

  10. #25

    Join Date
    Jan 05
    Location
    Being a role model
    Posts
    34,456

    Quote Originally Posted by XgradROCKdad
    I'll be your waiter tonight Mr. Crump... please allow me to bring you some cheese to go with your WHINE.
    I agree. Private schools should quit whining about their perception, suck it up and admit they have advantages.

  11. #26

    Join Date
    Apr 04
    Location
    Nowhere
    Posts
    1,318

    Quote Originally Posted by ladiesbballcoach
    It is simply not that simple. It might be for the 4A public city schools but it is not that simple for the rural county schools.

    Good example is golf. $2500 to be a member of the country club in my county. Only 5 of my 14 golfers are members. Can't afford it. So they get to play 2 months out of the year. I feel safe in saying that Notre Dame, Bishop Brossart, Villa Madonna, Lex Catholic, etc. more than 40% of their golfers find themselves as members of a country club.

    I am NOT saying separate the two, but saying the situation is unequal and there is a distinct advantage. So when you say simply hire better coaches, you got to remember that rural, public school coaches have to do MORE and a BETTER job than the private school coaches, because the private school coaches are usually starting with better polished athletes. Unless you feel that a golfer can be just as good playing 2 months out of the year vs. a golfer than can play from April through October everyday of the week.
    I disagree with you. It is the structure that makes it better. I have taught in both. You are right. The public school coach has to deal with a little more problems. He is also getting paid more. The public schools paid me a heck of a lot more then the private schools. I think it is the structure of the school system. The public school gave every kid the benefit of the doubt on everything. Which teaches them to whine and complain. The Catholic school teaches them to take it like a man/woman and face the facts and take responsibility for their mistakes.

    I agree with a quote from the Covington superintendent. These people who send there kids to private schools and then paying city taxes and city property taxes are doing the public schools a favor. Don't forget these superintendent's and school board members are not going to make these people made especially come election time.

    I also have to say the catholic schools keep a good alumni base.

  12. #27

    Join Date
    Jan 05
    Location
    Being a role model
    Posts
    34,456

    Quote Originally Posted by Rambo4343
    I disagree with you. It is the structure that makes it better. I have taught in both. You are right. The public school coach has to deal with a little more problems. He is also getting paid more. The public schools paid me a heck of a lot more then the private schools. I think it is the structure of the school system. The public school gave every kid the benefit of the doubt on everything. Which teaches them to whine and complain. The Catholic school teaches them to take it like a man/woman and face the facts and take responsibility for their mistakes.

    I agree with a quote from the Covington superintendent. These people who send there kids to private schools and then paying city taxes and city property taxes are doing the public schools a favor. Don't forget these superintendent's and school board members are not going to make these people made especially come election time.

    I also have to say the catholic schools keep a good alumni base.
    I am not sure where you think we are disagreeing, because I agree with 99% of what you say. I think the majority of the whining and complaining being taught is from home and it is just used more at school.

  13. #28

    Join Date
    Apr 04
    Location
    Nowhere
    Posts
    1,318

    Quote Originally Posted by ladiesbballcoach
    I am not sure where you think we are disagreeing, because I agree with 99% of what you say. I think the majority of the whining and complaining being taught is from home and it is just used more at school.
    I just read what you are saying. I got ya! It sounded like you were saying the catholic schools were teaching this.

  14. #29

    Join Date
    Nov 01
    Location
    St. Matthews, Home of the 2006 and 17 time KY State Champion Trinity Shamrocks
    Posts
    6,464

    Quote Originally Posted by Conqueror6
    It seems to me that the "Private" school supporters are happy until the word "recruit" is spelled out. Innuendo? Maybe. I can assure you that no rumor is being passed around here. What I am suggesting is that it could be so out of control that we are to the "point of no return" on getting this injustice to Kentucky athletes corrected. Also, my comments could be viewed at shameful to those who don't have a conscience. We are talking about athletes and athletics here. This young man in question could have actually contributed something to a team at public school, but I'm sure the "Bling-Bling" associated with a championship is more enticing to immature teenagers. Matter of fact, it was the father of this young man that was proud enough to tell everyone about all the nice "jewelry" and how simple it was for his son to get some of it. Maybe there should be a course taught at some of the "Privates" on how to keep a "Superego" under control.
    Sorry my friend, but as a father of a kid that owns some of that jewelry I must correct you. My son went to Trinity for a lot more than football. He turned out to be a marginal player, but a fine young man. I asked him recently if he missed some things about his high school days, he said yes but football didn't even pop up in the top ten. He was proud of his efforts on the grid iron though and felt every bit as much a champion as anyone else on the team and for good reason. Maybe he didn't "contribute" in your book, but at schools like Trinity and St.X evry kids efforts are appreciated and welcomed. And since they seem to win their share of titles maybe you should try it their way.

  15. #30

    Join Date
    Nov 02
    Posts
    55,091

    Frankly, at this point, I am to the point of saying the privates just leave, do their own thing, continue their traditions, build new traditions, increase their dominance and sit back and listen as the public schools keep whining about each other, and the fact that now the privates can recruit, give athletic scholarships, etc.

    I'm firmly convinced that our society has come to the point that everyone expects that everything is equal at all points in life, and I think that's reflected in this issue. So, I'll continue to support the private schools fervently....whatever happens to their membership in the KHSAA. I'll continue to support the hundreds of kids who play sports, but never see any playing time because of the sheer number of kids ahead of them on the depth chart. Those kids who come out, practice, get the stuffing knocked out of them by the first team in practice, and thank them for helping our starters be the players they are. Because those scout team kids....they could start at some other schools. But they want to be a part of the tradition of their chosen private school. Takes a lot of character to play, practice and keep getting the stuffing knocked out of you day-in-day-out, knowing you'll probably never hear your name called on a Friday night.

Top