"Since 1990, 11 schools have won 49 out of the 60 state titles"...

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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by ladiesbballcoach
    So you are saying that it is NOT only hard work that wins championships but also talent?

    I believe that is what the publics are admitting. That the talent is consistently at the private schools and the VAST, VAST majority of public schools cannot compete with that, no matter how hard they work.
    I think we're also using the "hard work" scenario the wrong way. I'm not just speaking of lifting, running and conditioning. I'm talking about the 100% commitment from the community, faculty, staff, coaching staff, players and parents of each of these schools. I think this is what most are missing about the "hard work" end of it.
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by lockcy brown
    As an outsider I thought I could speak openly on this question,and we still reside in Fort Thomas,just not born and raised.

    No. This year team is not as senior dominated and that's the biggest difference. Regarding how hard they (the Birds) work. I have been around 4 DIFFERENT programs in NKY over the past 15 years and I have yet to see one that works as hard as Highlands not saying that their isn't, but none, absolutely none I have been around and that not blowing smoke or making any digs at any team. That a pure fact.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stickymitts
    I think we're also using the "hard work" scenario the wrong way. I'm not just speaking of lifting, running and conditioning. I'm talking about the 100% commitment from the community, faculty, staff, coaching staff, players and parents of each of these schools. I think this is what most are missing about the "hard work" end of it.
    I agree 100% of that.

    And that is a societal issue that the KHSAA cannot address. So, as an administrator as a public school, knowing you cannot change that problem, is it not reasonable that you try and alter what you CAN address. You create an environment that your students might find some success and develop the community pride that is now missing.

    Or do you simply stay status quo and let this monster of "the haves and the have-nots" continue to feed itself.

    I don't know if Prop 20 is the answer but what we have now is not the answer either.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by ladiesbballcoach
    I agree 100% of that.

    And that is a societal issue that the KHSAA cannot address. So, as an administrator as a public school, knowing you cannot change that problem, is it not reasonable that you try and alter what you CAN address. You create an environment that your students might find some success and develop the community pride that is now missing.

    Or do you simply stay status quo and let this monster of "the haves and the have-nots" continue to feed itself.

    I don't know if Prop 20 is the answer but what we have now is not the answer either.
    As an administrator, I hope they'd be worried about building school spirit to help keep the kids in their school district, not limiting others to boundaries. Again IMO, this is where the hard work is missing. It's easier to make a proposal to fix the problem than to work your tail off and fix it yourself. Again, IMO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stickymitts
    As an administrator, I hope they'd be worried about building school spirit to help keep the kids in their school district, not limiting others to boundaries. Again IMO, this is where the hard work is missing. It's easier to make a proposal to fix the problem than to work your tail off and fix it yourself. Again, IMO.
    I agree in a perfect world. But public schools live in a world where parents sometimes are wonderful parents but are also sometimes 1)don't care if their kids are in school or not, getting an education or not, as long as they are out of their hair; 2)their actions are openly working against the school. That is the reality of the environment of the public school. Kids leaving the meth lab house that their parents are running to come to school and hear an anti-drug message. Parents who allow their children to miss not just 20-30 days but 40-50-70 days of school. Parents who tell the administrators that attitude and grades of their children is his problem not theirs.

    Private and public schools live in two different worlds. Public school teachers would love, LOVE to have the support that most private schools have.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by ladiesbballcoach
    I agree in a perfect world. But public schools live in a world where parents sometimes are wonderful parents but more often than not either 1)don't care if their kids are in school or not, getting an education or not, as long as they are out of their hair; 2)their actions are openly working against the school. That is the reality of the environment of the public school. Kids leaving the meth lab house that their parents are running to come to school and hear an anti-drug message. Parents who allow their children to miss not just 20-30 days but 40-50-70 days of school. Parents who tell the administrators that attitude and grades of their children is his problem not theirs.

    Private and public schools live in two different worlds. Public school teachers would love, LOVE to have the support that most private schools have.
    Answer me this: Why punish the schools, communities, parents and students that are doing it right?

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    Quote Originally Posted by stickymitts
    Answer me this: Why punish the schools, communities, parents and students that are doing it right?
    I don't see it as a punishment. No more than separation by class would be a punishment. It is an accepted reality that in football, cross country and track (not sure why the last two get classified but they are) A schools will not compete on a year in and year out basis with AAAA schools. Same principle for private/public. The envirnoments of the school make it that on a year in and year out basis publics will not be able to compete with a private school.

    I see it more as a concession on the degradation of our society. Is it right or wrong, I don't know. But the system as is, is not working either. Just as the wealthy of our society seeing our economic system working great and the middle/lower class seeing it as not working. Remember we have people in this country that believe that GW did not help New Orleans because they were poor people. The rich got out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ladiesbballcoach
    I don't see it as a punishment. No more than separation by class would be a punishment. It is an accepted reality that in football, cross country and track (not sure why the last two get classified but they are) A schools will not compete on a year in and year out basis with AAAA schools. Same principle for private/public. The envirnoments of the school make it that on a year in and year out basis publics will not be able to compete with a private school.

    I see it more as a concession on the degradation of our society. Is it right or wrong, I don't know. But the system as is, is not working either.

    Then, there's nothing at all that can be done to "level" the playing field. Even among public schools, there are those that "have it", and those that don't.

    You can't fix a societal issue by eliminating segments of that society.

    The core principle is this: Life isn't fair.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rockmom
    The core principle is this: Life isn't fair.
    Spoken like the true red blooded Conservative Republican you're not. LOL :creepy:

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    Quote Originally Posted by rockmom
    Then, there's nothing at all that can be done to "level" the playing field. Even among public schools, there are those that "have it", and those that don't.

    You can't fix a societal issue by eliminating segments of that society.

    The core principle is this: Life isn't fair.
    Or you create two different systems as the class system created 4 different systems. Would you be in favor of eliminating the class system in football?

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    Quote Originally Posted by RunFirst
    Spoken like the true red blooded Conservative Republican you're not. LOL


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    Quote Originally Posted by ladiesbballcoach
    I agree 100% of that.

    And that is a societal issue that the KHSAA cannot address. So, as an administrator as a public school, knowing you cannot change that problem, is it not reasonable that you try and alter what you CAN address. You create an environment that your students might find some success and develop the community pride that is now missing.

    Or do you simply stay status quo and let this monster of "the haves and the have-nots" continue to feed itself.

    I don't know if Prop 20 is the answer but what we have now is not the answer either.

    First of all, "the smalller public rural schools" don't have to compete with X, Trinity, CovCath and the like in football. I know you are talking about all sports. In that case, the problem is all sports aren't classified, which is really unfair, and it has nothing to do with public and privates.

    I disagree with your assumption of "haves" and "have nots." Danville, Mayfield, Beechwood, Belfry, Bardstown, Highlands, Boyle Co., and Male are all public schools. Are you saying that those are the only schools that have talent???

    And explain Boyle Co. coming out of nowhere to win 5 straight championships???

    How many private schools win the basketball titles?

    My point is you are trying to make this too simple and saying it is just because privates have all the talent and all the school support. There are a lot of variables.

    And the idea of "if I believe I can't win, change the rules" is ridiculous. There are ways to improve any program in any sport. It may take time, but it can be done, without changing the whole universe of high school sports in KY.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ladiesbballcoach
    Or you create two different systems as the class system created 4 different systems. Would you be in favor of eliminating the class system in football?

    How can you create two different systems and have it be fair to everyone?

    Within each system, there would still be classes. You don't eliminate the inequities by dividing the privates and the publics. All you do is furter exacerbate the inequities among the publics, and make things more difficult for the privates. Now, if the concern is simply that the privates be faced with more obstacles, then the goal will be accomplished. But if the goal is to TRUELY diminish the inequities among schools, this goal will NOT be accomplished. It's impossible, because there will NEVER be 100% support and 100% equal talent level, coaching and facilities among schools.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stickymitts
    Not sure. Why does that matter?
    Hard work alone isn't enough. I don't doubt that Highlands works harder than most programs but there are other ingredients. Good coaching and talent immediately come to mind.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildcat
    First of all, "the smalller public rural schools" don't have to compete with X, Trinity, CovCath and the like in football. I know you are talking about all sports. In that case, the problem is all sports aren't classified, which is really unfair, and it has nothing to do with public and privates.

    I disagree with your assumption of "haves" and "have nots." Danville, Mayfield, Beechwood, Belfry, Bardstown, Highlands, Boyle Co., and Male are all public schools. Are you saying that those are the only schools that have talent???

    And explain Boyle Co. coming out of nowhere to win 5 straight championships???

    How many private schools win the basketball titles?

    My point is you are trying to make this too simple and saying it is just because privates have all the talent and all the school support. There are a lot of variables.

    And the idea of "if I believe I can't win, change the rules" is ridiculous. There are ways to improve any program in any sport. It may take time, but it can be done, without changing the whole universe of high school sports in KY.
    As far as private schools and basketball, some on here already know my answer. Sacred Heart and Lex Catholic have won the last 5 titles.

    And it would not be changing the whole universe of HS sports in KY. Simply creating a 5th class. And as far as your schools listed, mostly small communities where community pride is easier to develop and less resources are needed. Boyle County is an interesting anamoly. 1 rural county out of about 100. Would not classify that percentage as a normal example.

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