What should I do to start the recruiting process off?

  1. #1
    ColonelCrazy's Avatar
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    What should I do to start the recruiting process off?

    I know that this was a thread before all of the upgrades...but I'm going to start it again and hope that this forum will take off.

    What does one who is interested and gifted enough to play a collegiate sport need to do to get recognition? What do most colleges look for in an athlete? How important are grades?

    How much would a program, such as the National Scouting Report, improve my chances of landing a scholarship? How can I get in contact with NSR, or one of the affiliates?



    Fellow Members of BGP: A lot of you probably don't understand how lucky you are to be a part of a site where the CEO (the guru) is concerned enough about our commonwealth to where he brings in guys such as NSR and ChrisH who run businesses to help out the local youth. We all need to take advantage of this resource. Let's get this College Recruiting forum started by asking some questions. I've tried to get things started, but the rest of us need to continue. It's really a privelage.
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    National Scouting Report's Avatar
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    All of these questions, and more, are addressed at the free seminars I occasionally have, like those in Lexington, Somerset, Elizabethtown, etc. So when you hear of them, please consider attending. You can ask anyone who has attended...they are NOT sales pitches.

    I am happy to answer any/all questions here as well.

    What does one need to do to get recognition?
    1) Make sure you are good enough to play college athletics. Ask your coaches and others who have either been there or know what kind of talent is required. People don't just wake up to compete in college.
    2) Promote yourself, or enlist the services of a reputable scouting service to do it for you. IT IS NOT YOUR COACH'S JOB, although any help they can provide would be welcome and beneficial. If you don't promote yourself (send profiles, emails, video, make phone calls), how would expect college coaches - outside of those who read your local newspaper - to know about you? Get on my website - www.nsr-inc.com/tgreco - click on the "Local Athletes" page, and click on someone's name to see examples of profiles which should be sent to AS MANY college coaches as possible. How do you know which one is recruiting your position that year, has scholarship money available AND likes you?
    3) For many sports, have some video footage available, as coaches will not get serious until they see you play. And given the limited number of recruiting/evaluation days available, video is very important.

    What do colleges look for in athlete? Ability, grades and desire. In many sports, SPEED is huge. Club (select) competition is sometimes mandatory. Off-season training indicates dedication to the sport.

    How important are grades? H U G E!!! Here are 3 reasons...
    1) Tie breaker - If you are competing for a spot with someone who is just as fast and strong, but they have a 3.3 GPA with a 23 ACT, and you have a 2.8 GPA with a 21 ACT, who gets the money?
    2) Most athletic scholarships do NOT have to be full rides (100% of tuition, fees, room, board, books). So if you get a partial athletic scholarship, wouldn't it be nice to have an ADDITIONAL partial academic scholarship? Only good grades will get you one.
    3) DIII colleges (i.e. Centre College) can NOT give, by NCAA rule, athletic scholarships, they can only award compensation based on ACADEMICS and financial need. So if you have sub-par grades, you will NOT get any academic money. And if your talent level indicates you can compete at the DIII level (nothing wrong with that), get ready for a hefty bill. These are the kids that end up attending a local state university due to expense, but can't realize their dream of competing in college. If they had better grades, they could get a boatload of academic money, and a great DIII education while playing 4 more years.

    How much would a program like NSR help your chances? If you have ability, grades, and flexibility regarding division of college competition AND geography, A LOT. All 25 of my 2002 graduates received offers, and 23 are playing in college...4 DI, 7 DII, 5 DIII, 6 NAIA, 1 JuCo. The results I had in my 1st full year EXCEEDED my expectations.

    I run NSR for Cincinnati and the state of Kentucky. Anyone can contact me from the information on my website, send me an email at tom.greco@fuse.net, or click on the "Local Scouts" page on my website to call a scout. If anyone across the state is interested in scouting, they can also contact me, but keep in mind that I am NOT looking for salesman, but rather people who enjoy educating families on the college athletic recruiting process.

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    ColonelCrazy's Avatar
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    Grades

    Thanks NSR, great post with lots of information.

    But I have another question regarding grades. Many students are in "honors" or "AP" or "Advanced" classes. Do college scouts, coaches etc. look at this and take this into consideration? For example, is a student best off to get an 85 in an Honors class, or get a 93 in a regular class. I know that it will vary from coach to coach, and from school to school, but do coaches even look at this and take this into consideration?

    Also, what is more important. Consider this-- an athlete is in all advanced classes, and has a an averae of 82.Then, he gets a good score on his ACT (We'll say a 29). He has the same athletic ability as a student athlete who has a 77 Average in all of the same classes, but scored a 30-31 on his ACT. Which one, in most cases, would get the scholarship? Basically, what I'm trying to ask is what matters more...Grade Point Average, or ACT/SAT Test Scores?

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    Sure they take it into consideration, but so do high schools. They typically weight AP grades in the GPA calculation, i.e. a B in an AP class counts as a 4.0, same as an A in a regular class.

    I believe ACT/SAT scores mean more. They are standardized tests which allow for comparison across geography and are independent of the impact of the individual school or teacher. I'd take the student-athlete with the higher test score.

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