What can a sophmore do?

  1. #1
    XgradROCKdad's Avatar
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    What can a sophmore do?

    What can a sophmore do to introduce himself to colleges?
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    XgradROCKdad's Avatar
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    Probably first spell sophomore correctly.... ha ha ha

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    TigerKat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by XgradROCKdad
    Probably first spell sophomore correctly.... ha ha ha
    If he plays some Varsity this year send those tapes to schools. They want games or whole 1/4's not a highlight film. Anyone can make those. They want to see everyplay in series as much as possible.

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    The Claw's Avatar
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    Attend camps of interest during the summer. Blue Chip camps where there are a lot of coaches. Georgetown and Louisville have them scheduled yearly.
    College coaches read box scores during the season. Play in the state tournament is very helpful not to mention winning games during play.
    Have a good attitude, make good grades and the coaching staff will recommend and take care of it.
    Last edited by The Claw; Feb 24, 05 at 06:10 PM.

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    XgradROCKdad's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info. He played a lot of varsity this past year (for a sophomore). He plays o-line, so stats are hard to come by.... but he's an honor role kid with a heart bigger than your computer screen!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 50inarow
    Contact the schools directly where he is interested in playing. Each of these teams has a "Recruiting Coordinator". Tapes will be helpful. At this point, it is all about "getting on the radar". Nothing like giving the college coaches a call to say, Im interesting playing for you.

    Camps are good too. The coaches can compare kid vs kid, and get to know them as a person as well.

    Talk to coach Beatty also. Let him know your son's intent on playing at the next level.
    I would have the player ask the coach. Coaches cringe when parents call them. Just my opinion

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    nljagsfan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TigerKat
    If he plays some Varsity this year send those tapes to schools. They want games or whole 1/4's not a highlight film. Anyone can make those. They want to see everyplay in series as much as possible.
    1. Put together all the info on the kid (stats, height, weight, 40 time, bench press PLUS academic information GPA, ACT if taken, any honors or awards) and put it in a nice organized format and get it to college coaches. Collegiate coaches have never offered a scholly to anyone they haven't heard of! Include letters of reference from your coach, opposing coaches, school administrators, etc. to give the coaches an insight into the content of your character, a very important factor these days.
    2. College coaches do prefer game videos to see how a player does for an entire game. However, highlight tapes do get watched by many college coaches. They generally don't offer from highlights, however, it does tell them whether a kid has the ability to make plays. I have worked with several kids and can tell you that IF they like the highlights, they will more often than not request 2 full game videos. I actually have worked with at least one kid who has received D1 offers based on his highlight video and package the college received AFTER they confirmed that the information was accurate.
    3. Go to camps to improve your game and showcase your talents
    4. Be honest with yourself (or your child) as to the level of play the student athlete best fits. There is nothing wrong with getting play collegiately at ANY level. It is an honor! I know kids who only sent stuff to D1 schools and not get any interest from them and give up. Playing at D2, NAIA or D3 is an awesome experience!
    5. Be honest with the colleges. Don't fudge numbers/stats/particulars as it will destroy any credibility with the collegiate coaches.
    6. Don't limit yourself to 5-6 schools. Do your research and learn about the numerous schools who participate in your sport.
    7. The most important one, ... keep your grades up! Colleges are not interested in athletes who will never be eligible to play. How many prop 48's do you year about these days? Not many as many never made it to the playing field/court.
    8. Talk to your coach to see what he/she thinks and what they can do to help you!

    I know of sophomores who have been invited on unofficial visits, so starting early is never a bad thing! Just understand that it is a process to get your name out there!
    Last edited by nljagsfan; Feb 25, 05 at 01:40 PM.

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    National Scouting Report's Avatar
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    nljagsfan-

    Wow, what a post. I could not have said it any better, so I won't even try. Thanks!

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    nljagsfan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by National Scouting Report
    nljagsfan-

    Wow, what a post. I could not have said it any better, so I won't even try. Thanks!
    Come on NSR, we all know that you are da man here! After communicating with you in the past, I thought you would like that post!

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    National Scouting Report's Avatar
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    Like it? I LOVE it! Keep them coming!

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    THEGREENDANDY's Avatar
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    Parents must take an active role in the recruiting process. I have put a DVD together and sent it out to 30 schools. We have gotten responses back from all of them. He will be a senior next year, so it really helps in getting the kid noticed. Thankfully, both of my sons play for a coach who also goes the extra mile trying to get the boys noticed.

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    One of the first things in my opinion is to realistically evaluate where the player may fit. If he doesn't have the size, speed or both then D1 is less likely. All of the efforts with tape and camps will go for naught. If he does have the size, speed or both then the post by nljagsfan is all good.

    If the player is D2, D3 or NAIA but wants D1 there may be a specialty team position that could land them a scholly. Punter, kicker, long snapper all come to mind.

    It's good that th coach is willing to invest some time to get the player noticed. That could be hugh in getting a second look from some colleges.

    Work hard in school and on the field, it will pay off in some way.

    Good Luck!

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    Being a Sophomore, I would strongly suggest any student-athlete, to attend various Camps, Showcases and Combines. Do the research and see which other Colleges will have representatives, in attendance.

    A College will only evaluate and recruit, if they are aware of you. Player Informational data, videos, in-person evaluation, high school coaches contacting and player/family contacting, are needed. Make a list of colleges, that you would consider. Research the school and see if they have the program you are interested in majoring in. Look at the financial aid and FAFSA, that is available. Don't limit your intention of playing, to a certain Division and keep open minded.

    nljagsfan, was very accurate with his information. I would also strongly encourage, student-athletes to take the ACT as an 8th grader and continue the process, throughout High School. Make efforts to improve your overall score.

    Register with the Clearinghouse in the Junior year and like stated before, maintain the academics. Most importantly, when a College coach contacts you, reply and respond back to them. Don't discuss playing time, but inquire about schedule, academics, weight room, facilities, training and the admission process.

  15. #15
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    When trying to get your son recruited it is very important to know your market target. Honest evaluation of your sons talent is extremely critical. It will determine who you contact. Is he major DI-A, small D-IA, DI-AA, D2, NAIA, etc. Let's say he is legit DI-AA talent. Then the majority of your contacts should be at that level.

    Once you have determined that. You will begin the process of trying to get your son recruited. If you go to the websites of most nonDI-A schools and look at their rosters, you'll find that most of the kids are from the state the school is in or within 100 miles or so from the school. Why? Because they don't have the budget to go all over the place like the big schools. So YOU have to let them know you are interested in them.

    As a sophmore, make your search broad and large. Determine how far away from home he is willing to go. Anywhere, only south, within 250 miles, etc. Take a compass and draw a circle on a map, or highlight the areas he likes. I would recommend contacting at least 50 schools, up to 100. Your break down should be roughly 70% at your market target, 15% above your market target, and 15% below your market target. Start a file on every school you contact, nothing fancy just a piece of paper with names, phone numbers, email addresses, and a blank sheet to write down any contact or dates.

    There is a website: www.50states.com/college/ you can click on any state and get an alphabetical list of every school in that state. Click on any school, and it will give you some basic info on the school plus there will be a link to the school website. There you can get email addresses for coaches and recruiting coordinators. Some websites it's easy to find the info, others you have to look pretty hard.

    Put together a letter of introduction and a bio sheet. Don't send film out with a first mailing. I have found that e:mail works just as well as snail mail these days. The letter should be from your son, not you. Follow up imediately on any contact. Call them and have your son's coach call them.

    Do all of the other thins that nljagsfan said.

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